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The Briefing

The Briefing

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A daily news podcast, The Briefing gives you the latest headlines, discussion and explainer interviews, all in under 20 minutes. Bringing you the news you need to know at 6am and 3pm Monday to Friday, and profiles across the weekend, The Br

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#News & Opinion

Season 5


Should pharmacists be given more power to issue prescriptions?

Pharmacists are being given more power to give and refill prescriptions. It comes as more and more GPs opt out of bulk billing and a doctor shortage in regional areas mean it’s more difficult to see a doctor. So where are the trials and what types of medications can you get without having to see a GP? We’ll hear frome the Australian Medical Association, someone involved in the NSW/ACT Pharmacy Trial, and look at where those trials are at the moment, if they’re being considered successful and if they really will take the pressure of GPs. Headlines: Assange facing last appeal against US extradition  US vetoes Gaza ceasefire resolution at the UN Triple murder takes place in Sydney Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Should pharmacists be given more power to issue prescriptions?

Pharmacists are being given more power to give and refill prescriptions. It comes as more and more GPs opt out of bulk billing and a doctor shortage in regional areas mean it’s more difficult to see a doctor. So where are the trials and what types of medications can you get without having to see a GP? We’ll hear frome the Australian Medical Association, someone involved in the NSW/ACT Pharmacy Trial, and look at where those trials are at the moment, if they’re being considered successful and if they really will take the pressure of GPs. Headlines: Assange facing last appeal against US extradition  US vetoes Gaza ceasefire resolution at the UN Triple murder takes place in Sydney Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

18:03

EP80 - S5

20 Feb 24

Is Sydney's asbestos mulch crisis about to spread across the country?

Sydney is currently dealing with a widespread asbestos-contaminated mulch investigation, with 45 locations - including potentially six schools - contaminated with bonded asbestos that was mixed in with garden mulch. Since investigation into the mulch began, most identified sites have been found with the much lower risk bonded asbestos, while two have been found to include friable asbestos, which poses a much greater health risk to the community. So how did this happen, and is the rest of the country at risk? And could this current situation in NSW lead to greater control of asbestos nationally moving forward? On today's episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert speaks with LiSTNR journalist Tessa Randello, who has been following the recent crisis.

Is Sydney's asbestos mulch crisis about to spread across the country?

Sydney is currently dealing with a widespread asbestos-contaminated mulch investigation, with 45 locations - including potentially six schools - contaminated with bonded asbestos that was mixed in with garden mulch. Since investigation into the mulch began, most identified sites have been found with the much lower risk bonded asbestos, while two have been found to include friable asbestos, which poses a much greater health risk to the community. So how did this happen, and is the rest of the country at risk? And could this current situation in NSW lead to greater control of asbestos nationally moving forward? On today's episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert speaks with LiSTNR journalist Tessa Randello, who has been following the recent crisis.

10:31

EP79 - S5

20 Feb 24

Who are the 41,000 victims of our growing human trafficking market?

The number of people charged with human trafficking in Australian Federal Police is growing year on year. We’re talking about forced marriage, sexual exploitation, child trafficking, forced labour, domestic servitude and even slavery. In this episode of the Briefing, we’re joined by Justine Nolan is a Professor in the Faculty of Law and Justice at UNSW Sydney and Director of the Australian Human Rights Institute, to take a deep dive on what constitutes human trafficking and why, despite increased awareness, it keeps growing year on year Headlines: Alexei Navalny's widow vows to keep fighting for a free Russia  Labor senator backs drug and alcohol testing for politicians Woman goes into labour at Taylor Swift's concert Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Who are the 41,000 victims of our growing human trafficking market?

The number of people charged with human trafficking in Australian Federal Police is growing year on year. We’re talking about forced marriage, sexual exploitation, child trafficking, forced labour, domestic servitude and even slavery. In this episode of the Briefing, we’re joined by Justine Nolan is a Professor in the Faculty of Law and Justice at UNSW Sydney and Director of the Australian Human Rights Institute, to take a deep dive on what constitutes human trafficking and why, despite increased awareness, it keeps growing year on year Headlines: Alexei Navalny's widow vows to keep fighting for a free Russia  Labor senator backs drug and alcohol testing for politicians Woman goes into labour at Taylor Swift's concert Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

21:37

EP78 - S5

19 Feb 24

The stunning bravery and suspicious death of Alexei Navalny

The man many considered Russian President Vladimir Putin’s most powerful critic, Alexie Navalny, is dead.  His death comes after a highly publicised assassination attempt a few years ago, when it's believed Russian secret services tried to kill him by putting the deadly nerve agent Novichok into his underpants.  Incredibly, Navalny survived that assassination attempt. However, instead of remaining safe in exile overseas like many of the country’s opposition figures, he returned to Russia, where he was quickly arrested and sent to prison.  So who was Alexie Navalny, and why was it now that Putin has supposedly had him killed? And what does this mean for the pro-democracy movement in Russia moving forward?  On today's afternoon episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert speaks with Russian politics specialist from La Trobe University, Dr Robert Horvath, to learn more.

The stunning bravery and suspicious death of Alexei Navalny

The man many considered Russian President Vladimir Putin’s most powerful critic, Alexie Navalny, is dead.  His death comes after a highly publicised assassination attempt a few years ago, when it's believed Russian secret services tried to kill him by putting the deadly nerve agent Novichok into his underpants.  Incredibly, Navalny survived that assassination attempt. However, instead of remaining safe in exile overseas like many of the country’s opposition figures, he returned to Russia, where he was quickly arrested and sent to prison.  So who was Alexie Navalny, and why was it now that Putin has supposedly had him killed? And what does this mean for the pro-democracy movement in Russia moving forward?  On today's afternoon episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert speaks with Russian politics specialist from La Trobe University, Dr Robert Horvath, to learn more.

12:48

EP77 - S5

19 Feb 24

Dementia: The growing challenge to Australians as they age

There are 450,000 Australians living with Dementia. Our parents or grandparents drift away from us as the disease takes hold. So are we doing enough to manage the crisis? Closed wards, limited interactions with the outside world, a long list of medications, in some cases restraints, doesn’t sound like the way we’d like to see our loved ones treated. In this episode of The Briefing, we’re joined by Maree McCabe, the CEO of Dementia Australia, to try to find out what can be done for our family and friends as the number of Australians with Dementia escalates. Headlines: Anthony Albanese blames Putin for Navalny's death Around 40 suspected asylum seekers transported to Nauru Sydney's asbestos problem grows Taylor Swift wraps up her Melbourne shows Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Dementia: The growing challenge to Australians as they age

There are 450,000 Australians living with Dementia. Our parents or grandparents drift away from us as the disease takes hold. So are we doing enough to manage the crisis? Closed wards, limited interactions with the outside world, a long list of medications, in some cases restraints, doesn’t sound like the way we’d like to see our loved ones treated. In this episode of The Briefing, we’re joined by Maree McCabe, the CEO of Dementia Australia, to try to find out what can be done for our family and friends as the number of Australians with Dementia escalates. Headlines: Anthony Albanese blames Putin for Navalny's death Around 40 suspected asylum seekers transported to Nauru Sydney's asbestos problem grows Taylor Swift wraps up her Melbourne shows Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

21:47

EP76 - S5

18 Feb 24

Tony Armstrong on why hard work doesn’t always pay off

Tony Armstrong is a proud Gamilaroi man and former AFL player, turned TV presenter, podcaster and two time Logie winner. With his moustache and cheeky smile all over our screens as the sports presenter on ABCTV News Breakfast and a regular on the project, Tony seems to have it all. In this chat with Tom Tilley, Tony unpacks his relationship with Adam Goodes, how he feels since the Voice referendum and why hard work doesn’t always pay off. Send us your Weekend Briefing suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

Tony Armstrong on why hard work doesn’t always pay off

Tony Armstrong is a proud Gamilaroi man and former AFL player, turned TV presenter, podcaster and two time Logie winner. With his moustache and cheeky smile all over our screens as the sports presenter on ABCTV News Breakfast and a regular on the project, Tony seems to have it all. In this chat with Tom Tilley, Tony unpacks his relationship with Adam Goodes, how he feels since the Voice referendum and why hard work doesn’t always pay off. Send us your Weekend Briefing suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

39:44

EP75 - S5

17 Feb 24

Azure Antoinette and her friendship with Antoinette Lattouf

Azure Antoinette is a Grammy nominated poet, a corporate crisis fixer, a public speaker and a global ambassador for living with multiple sclerosis. Azure moved to left LA and arrived on Australian shores a few years ago, both for love, and because of threats from the Ku Klux Klan which drove her from home. In this chat with Antoinette Lattouf, Azure breaks down what it’s like being the co-host of a new podcast, The Antoinettes, with our very own Antoinette Lattouf. Weekend List: Bogan San Choy Bao Dance class at your gym or at home with MadFit on Youtube  Taylor Elyse Tomlinson Netflix specials  Dance Life on Amazon Prime  Send us your Weekend List suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

Azure Antoinette and her friendship with Antoinette Lattouf

Azure Antoinette is a Grammy nominated poet, a corporate crisis fixer, a public speaker and a global ambassador for living with multiple sclerosis. Azure moved to left LA and arrived on Australian shores a few years ago, both for love, and because of threats from the Ku Klux Klan which drove her from home. In this chat with Antoinette Lattouf, Azure breaks down what it’s like being the co-host of a new podcast, The Antoinettes, with our very own Antoinette Lattouf. Weekend List: Bogan San Choy Bao Dance class at your gym or at home with MadFit on Youtube  Taylor Elyse Tomlinson Netflix specials  Dance Life on Amazon Prime  Send us your Weekend List suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

37:28

EP74 - S5

16 Feb 24

Are we too Swift in criticising obsessed popstar fans?

Taylor Swift is the talk of the town, with the icon shortly kicking off her leg of the Australian Eras Tour show tonight in Melbourne. The hype is real, with Swifties creating palpable levels of excitement right across the country. So why have we become so caught up in Swiftmania? And in a broader sense, why do fan girls cop more criticism than sports fans, who are often just as passionate? On today's afternoon episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert speaks with LiSTNR journalist Loren Howarth, who has deep-dived into our cultural criticism of music fans.

Are we too Swift in criticising obsessed popstar fans?

Taylor Swift is the talk of the town, with the icon shortly kicking off her leg of the Australian Eras Tour show tonight in Melbourne. The hype is real, with Swifties creating palpable levels of excitement right across the country. So why have we become so caught up in Swiftmania? And in a broader sense, why do fan girls cop more criticism than sports fans, who are often just as passionate? On today's afternoon episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert speaks with LiSTNR journalist Loren Howarth, who has deep-dived into our cultural criticism of music fans.

13:05

EP73 - S5

16 Feb 24

Australia eliminated measles. Here's why it's making a comeback

Measles is making a comeback. Here’s what you need to know. Australia was declared Measles-free ten years ago, but a resurgence in cases, largely from people visiting from overseas, has seen it return. It’s not just a itchy rash, either. It can lead to very serious health problems. So in this episode of The Briefing, how and why has Measles returned to Australia and what you need to know to stay safe. Headlines: Judge lists first Trump criminal trial for next month Politicians call for HECS overhaul  Israeli army storms Gaza’s main hospital  Britain slides into recession ahead of election Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Australia eliminated measles. Here's why it's making a comeback

Measles is making a comeback. Here’s what you need to know. Australia was declared Measles-free ten years ago, but a resurgence in cases, largely from people visiting from overseas, has seen it return. It’s not just a itchy rash, either. It can lead to very serious health problems. So in this episode of The Briefing, how and why has Measles returned to Australia and what you need to know to stay safe. Headlines: Judge lists first Trump criminal trial for next month Politicians call for HECS overhaul  Israeli army storms Gaza’s main hospital  Britain slides into recession ahead of election Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

19:51

EP72 - S5

15 Feb 24

Tasmania is heading to an early election. Here's why you should care

Tasmania, currently the last Liberal government in the country, will head to an election more than a year earlier than planned. Yesterday, Premier Jeremy Rockliff announced that Tasmanians will vote on March 23rd, amidst claims that the parliament has become unworkable after two former Liberal MPs ditched the party and won’t agree to pass legislation. On today's afternoon episode of The Briefing, Tessa Randello from the Listnr newsroom joins Bension Siebert to discuss how the party in power for the last 10 years ended up in a minority, and the impact this result could have on the rest of the country.  

Tasmania is heading to an early election. Here's why you should care

Tasmania, currently the last Liberal government in the country, will head to an election more than a year earlier than planned. Yesterday, Premier Jeremy Rockliff announced that Tasmanians will vote on March 23rd, amidst claims that the parliament has become unworkable after two former Liberal MPs ditched the party and won’t agree to pass legislation. On today's afternoon episode of The Briefing, Tessa Randello from the Listnr newsroom joins Bension Siebert to discuss how the party in power for the last 10 years ended up in a minority, and the impact this result could have on the rest of the country.  

12:21

EP71 - S5

15 Feb 24

The growing divide between Gen Z, Millennials and everyone else

Gen Z or a Millennial? You’ve probably been told you’re more likely to vote toward the left of the political spectrum, only to drift further right as you get older. Well new research suggests that’s not actually the case. Gen Z and Millennials are sticking with the left. They’re deciding things like LGBTQI+ issues, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander issues, wider gender issues and climate change, are really important and they expect their politicians to think the same. In this episode of the Briefing, we’re joined by Shaun Ratcliff, a political scientist, lecturer at Sydney University and data scientist at the political research firm Accent Research. We pose the question, why are Gen Z and Millennials bucking the trend in their political persuasions? Headlines: Victorian disaster payments 200 million Indonesians voted in the world's largest single-day election Tasmanian election campaign kicks off a year early  Taylor Swift has touched down in Australia Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

The growing divide between Gen Z, Millennials and everyone else

Gen Z or a Millennial? You’ve probably been told you’re more likely to vote toward the left of the political spectrum, only to drift further right as you get older. Well new research suggests that’s not actually the case. Gen Z and Millennials are sticking with the left. They’re deciding things like LGBTQI+ issues, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander issues, wider gender issues and climate change, are really important and they expect their politicians to think the same. In this episode of the Briefing, we’re joined by Shaun Ratcliff, a political scientist, lecturer at Sydney University and data scientist at the political research firm Accent Research. We pose the question, why are Gen Z and Millennials bucking the trend in their political persuasions? Headlines: Victorian disaster payments 200 million Indonesians voted in the world's largest single-day election Tasmanian election campaign kicks off a year early  Taylor Swift has touched down in Australia Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

20:05

EP70 - S5

14 Feb 24

We need to talk about flowers, chocolate, and consent this Valentine's Day

Valentine’s Day for most usually means overpriced chocolates, flowers, presents (and maybe even sex). But Chanel Contos says it's also a particularly good time to talk about consent, and how to keep it front and centre in our intimate relationships.  The pressure surrounding Valentine’s Day can be overwhelming, with partners seeking consent often forgotten about or assumed. Is there a larger conversation needed about how we view and educate others about consent as a society? In this episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert speaks with Chanel Contos from Teach Us Consent to learn more about consent and her partnership with the condom brand, Lifestyle, to help share the message of consent this Valentine’s Day. If you need support, contact the national domestic, family and sexual violence counselling, information and support service 1800 RESPECT (1800 737 732), or check out their website for resources. To find out more about Teach Us Consent: Website Instagram To find out more about their partnership with LifeStyles: Website (Let's Talk Consent) Instagram  Facebook

We need to talk about flowers, chocolate, and consent this Valentine's Day

Valentine’s Day for most usually means overpriced chocolates, flowers, presents (and maybe even sex). But Chanel Contos says it's also a particularly good time to talk about consent, and how to keep it front and centre in our intimate relationships.  The pressure surrounding Valentine’s Day can be overwhelming, with partners seeking consent often forgotten about or assumed. Is there a larger conversation needed about how we view and educate others about consent as a society? In this episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert speaks with Chanel Contos from Teach Us Consent to learn more about consent and her partnership with the condom brand, Lifestyle, to help share the message of consent this Valentine’s Day. If you need support, contact the national domestic, family and sexual violence counselling, information and support service 1800 RESPECT (1800 737 732), or check out their website for resources. To find out more about Teach Us Consent: Website Instagram To find out more about their partnership with LifeStyles: Website (Let's Talk Consent) Instagram  Facebook

12:12

EP69 - S5

14 Feb 24

The big green gimmick - does your climate action make a difference?

We’re all recycling, buying electric cars, taking paper and recycled bags to the supermarket, but do our climate change actions really move the needle on global warming? There are anti-global warmists who say renewable energy is a myth, you achieve nothing by recycling your bottles and cans, and putting your paper in the paper bin is a waste of time. Are they right...? In this episode of The Briefing, we’re joined by Amanda McKenzie, the CEO of Climate Council to find the truth in the debate over whether your and my climate action really makes a difference in the grand scheme of things. Headlines: Victorian storms and fires Israeli ceasefire talks back underway  Taylor tix hacked Don’t swim with diarrhea 💩 Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

The big green gimmick - does your climate action make a difference?

We’re all recycling, buying electric cars, taking paper and recycled bags to the supermarket, but do our climate change actions really move the needle on global warming? There are anti-global warmists who say renewable energy is a myth, you achieve nothing by recycling your bottles and cans, and putting your paper in the paper bin is a waste of time. Are they right...? In this episode of The Briefing, we’re joined by Amanda McKenzie, the CEO of Climate Council to find the truth in the debate over whether your and my climate action really makes a difference in the grand scheme of things. Headlines: Victorian storms and fires Israeli ceasefire talks back underway  Taylor tix hacked Don’t swim with diarrhea 💩 Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

21:11

EP68 - S5

13 Feb 24

Like the Olympics, but on steroids. Meet the Enhanced Games

From disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong to Russia systematically doping its Olympic athletes, there has been no shortage of drug cheating scandals in the world of sport.  But what if we throw out the rule book, letting athletes push their bodies to the maximum possible performance - using whatever drugs they want?   Aron D'Souza is the president of the proposed Enhanced Games, an elite international sporting event without drug testing being planned to take place later this year. While he says the event would have strenuous health testing to keep athletes safe, many experts have countered that the games put athletes at serious risk. On today's afternoon episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert speaks with Aron D'Souza to find out more.

Like the Olympics, but on steroids. Meet the Enhanced Games

From disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong to Russia systematically doping its Olympic athletes, there has been no shortage of drug cheating scandals in the world of sport.  But what if we throw out the rule book, letting athletes push their bodies to the maximum possible performance - using whatever drugs they want?   Aron D'Souza is the president of the proposed Enhanced Games, an elite international sporting event without drug testing being planned to take place later this year. While he says the event would have strenuous health testing to keep athletes safe, many experts have countered that the games put athletes at serious risk. On today's afternoon episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert speaks with Aron D'Souza to find out more.

12:13

EP67 - S5

13 Feb 24

What the climate catastrophe in Antarctica means for Australia

Climate change is having an incredible impact on the continent of Antarctica. Historic drops in sea ice are accelerating the melt of ice sheets and the slowing of ocean currents, as well as catastrophic failures of emperor penguin colonies. A deteriorating climate in Antarctica will have a devastating impact on Australia. In this episode of the Briefing, we’re joined by Professor Matt King, an Antarctic expert at the University of Tasmania, and Director of the Australian Centre of Excellence in Antarctic Science. We find out how Antarctica’s climate crisis will impact Australia. Headlines: Two Israeli hostages freed from Gaza have been reunited with their families A catastrophic fire danger warning has been issued in Victoria Joe Biden wins the Superbowl Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

What the climate catastrophe in Antarctica means for Australia

Climate change is having an incredible impact on the continent of Antarctica. Historic drops in sea ice are accelerating the melt of ice sheets and the slowing of ocean currents, as well as catastrophic failures of emperor penguin colonies. A deteriorating climate in Antarctica will have a devastating impact on Australia. In this episode of the Briefing, we’re joined by Professor Matt King, an Antarctic expert at the University of Tasmania, and Director of the Australian Centre of Excellence in Antarctic Science. We find out how Antarctica’s climate crisis will impact Australia. Headlines: Two Israeli hostages freed from Gaza have been reunited with their families A catastrophic fire danger warning has been issued in Victoria Joe Biden wins the Superbowl Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

18:52

EP66 - S5

12 Feb 24

Barnaby Joyce was filmed while laying on the ground. Does it matter?

Did you see the video and memes over the weekend of Nationals MP and former deputy prime minister Barnaby Joyce lying down next to a planter box on a Canberra footpath at night, swearing loudly into his phone? Since the video surfaced, Barnaby Joyce has said he’d been "drinking" and was on "prescription medication" at the time. However, the incident raises a question on the expectations we place on our politicians and whether they are different for different people.  On this afternoon episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert speaks with Sean Kelly, a columnist with the Nine Newspapers and former advisor to prime ministers Julia Gillard and Kevin Rudd. 

Barnaby Joyce was filmed while laying on the ground. Does it matter?

Did you see the video and memes over the weekend of Nationals MP and former deputy prime minister Barnaby Joyce lying down next to a planter box on a Canberra footpath at night, swearing loudly into his phone? Since the video surfaced, Barnaby Joyce has said he’d been "drinking" and was on "prescription medication" at the time. However, the incident raises a question on the expectations we place on our politicians and whether they are different for different people.  On this afternoon episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert speaks with Sean Kelly, a columnist with the Nine Newspapers and former advisor to prime ministers Julia Gillard and Kevin Rudd. 

11:31

EP65 - S5

12 Feb 24

What happened to the Aussie apprentice?

Australia has a dire shortage of apprentices. Some say it’s because of low pay and physically demanding work. Others argue Generation Z is simply too lazy or soft. Advocates want more subsidies and investment to boost the workforce. But some young apprentices have reported toxic workplaces and hazing. Meanwhile, older tradies are struggling amid a surplus of work and drought of young workers. So how did we get into this mess – and how can we fix it? ACTU assistant secretary Liam O’Brien joins us in today’s deep dive. Headlines: Barnaby Joyce won’t be at a scheduled Nationals party meeting today Donald Trump says he would encourage Russia to attack NATO countries  A third of Aussie kids can’t read  58th Superbowl is on today Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

What happened to the Aussie apprentice?

Australia has a dire shortage of apprentices. Some say it’s because of low pay and physically demanding work. Others argue Generation Z is simply too lazy or soft. Advocates want more subsidies and investment to boost the workforce. But some young apprentices have reported toxic workplaces and hazing. Meanwhile, older tradies are struggling amid a surplus of work and drought of young workers. So how did we get into this mess – and how can we fix it? ACTU assistant secretary Liam O’Brien joins us in today’s deep dive. Headlines: Barnaby Joyce won’t be at a scheduled Nationals party meeting today Donald Trump says he would encourage Russia to attack NATO countries  A third of Aussie kids can’t read  58th Superbowl is on today Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

22:01

EP64 - S5

11 Feb 24

Josh Thomas and his gloriously messy homecoming

Josh Thomas became a house hold name after his series Please Like Me was nominated for an Emmy, hitting the global stage. The Aussie comedian has spent the last seven years living in LA - but has decided it’s time to come back home. In this chat with Tom Tilley, Josh unpacks his new stand up comedy show, Let’s Tidy Up, about his ADHD, autism and how that turns into a messy house. Send us your Weekend Briefing suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

Josh Thomas and his gloriously messy homecoming

Josh Thomas became a house hold name after his series Please Like Me was nominated for an Emmy, hitting the global stage. The Aussie comedian has spent the last seven years living in LA - but has decided it’s time to come back home. In this chat with Tom Tilley, Josh unpacks his new stand up comedy show, Let’s Tidy Up, about his ADHD, autism and how that turns into a messy house. Send us your Weekend Briefing suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

24:34

EP63 - S5

10 Feb 24

Ellie Cole found true happiness once she stopped swimming

Ellie Cole is Australia's most decorated female Paralympian, but that’s not what bought her happiness. When Ellie claimed her seventeenth Paralympic swimming medal in Tokyo she made history. And this year she was just recognised in Australia Day honours. In this chat with Antoinette Lattouf, Ellie explains how she found true happiness once she stopped swimming. Weekend List: Fly screens from Bunnings Uno card game Secrets we keep: Nest of Traitors season 2 Lounder Milk on Netflix Send us your Weekend List suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

Ellie Cole found true happiness once she stopped swimming

Ellie Cole is Australia's most decorated female Paralympian, but that’s not what bought her happiness. When Ellie claimed her seventeenth Paralympic swimming medal in Tokyo she made history. And this year she was just recognised in Australia Day honours. In this chat with Antoinette Lattouf, Ellie explains how she found true happiness once she stopped swimming. Weekend List: Fly screens from Bunnings Uno card game Secrets we keep: Nest of Traitors season 2 Lounder Milk on Netflix Send us your Weekend List suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

31:28

EP62 - S5

9 Feb 24

Should the Supreme Court kick Donald Trump out of the US election?

The US Supreme Court has a massive decision to make – whether to kick Donald Trump off the ballot in the 2024 election.   It follows a decision of Colorado’s top court that Trump is ineligible to be on the ballot in that state. But should a court strip voters of their right to choose the next President of the United States? Dave Levinthal is Editor-in-Chief of Raw Story. He joins Bension Siebert from Washington D.C. to tell us what happened in the Supreme Court overnight and what it might mean for the US going forward. 

Should the Supreme Court kick Donald Trump out of the US election?

The US Supreme Court has a massive decision to make – whether to kick Donald Trump off the ballot in the 2024 election.   It follows a decision of Colorado’s top court that Trump is ineligible to be on the ballot in that state. But should a court strip voters of their right to choose the next President of the United States? Dave Levinthal is Editor-in-Chief of Raw Story. He joins Bension Siebert from Washington D.C. to tell us what happened in the Supreme Court overnight and what it might mean for the US going forward. 

13:46

EP61 - S5

9 Feb 24

Is it right to medicate our dogs so they can live longer?

The dog-loving world went into meltdown recently, with the announcement of a brand new drug to help increase the life expectancy of large-breed dogs. The company behind it, Loyal is on the path to getting conditional approval from the US FDA for the drug and has also just kicked off a new study for a pill that’d see our smaller four-legged friends live longer, too. So how soon can we expect to see these treatments available? And what are the ethical issues surrounding such a pill? On today’s episode of The Briefing, we chat with Brennen McKenzie, the Director of Veterinary Medicine at Loyal. Headlines: Labor is going to have to re-work its right to disconnect legislation Global warming exceeds 1.5c level  Live export update Paris medals to have Eiffel Tower in them Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Is it right to medicate our dogs so they can live longer?

The dog-loving world went into meltdown recently, with the announcement of a brand new drug to help increase the life expectancy of large-breed dogs. The company behind it, Loyal is on the path to getting conditional approval from the US FDA for the drug and has also just kicked off a new study for a pill that’d see our smaller four-legged friends live longer, too. So how soon can we expect to see these treatments available? And what are the ethical issues surrounding such a pill? On today’s episode of The Briefing, we chat with Brennen McKenzie, the Director of Veterinary Medicine at Loyal. Headlines: Labor is going to have to re-work its right to disconnect legislation Global warming exceeds 1.5c level  Live export update Paris medals to have Eiffel Tower in them Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

21:35

EP60 - S5

8 Feb 24

#legginglegs is banned on TikTok. Here's why it wasn't a good fit

Have you seen the #legginglegs hashtag that was circulating on TikTok and Instagram? The trend saw female influencers posting videos of themselves wearing leggings, with the subtext promoting the idea that you need slim legs to do so. It quickly saw backlash over concerns that it could lead girls towards unhealthy eating or exercise behaviours, even leading to intervention from TikTok itself, now when you search for #legginglegs you'll be directed to Butterfly Foundation resources).  So why do we keep seeing these diet culture trends repackaged? Are we getting any better at calling them out? And should we be striving for body neutrality instead of comparing ourselves to endless online trends? On today's afternoon episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert is joined by LiSTNR journalist Micaela Savage to explain the #legginglegs trend. Help is always available. If you need support with an eating disorder, or have body image concerns, you can call Butterfly’s National Helpline on 1800 ED HOPE (1800 33 4673), or head to www.butterfly.org.au for more information.

#legginglegs is banned on TikTok. Here's why it wasn't a good fit

Have you seen the #legginglegs hashtag that was circulating on TikTok and Instagram? The trend saw female influencers posting videos of themselves wearing leggings, with the subtext promoting the idea that you need slim legs to do so. It quickly saw backlash over concerns that it could lead girls towards unhealthy eating or exercise behaviours, even leading to intervention from TikTok itself, now when you search for #legginglegs you'll be directed to Butterfly Foundation resources).  So why do we keep seeing these diet culture trends repackaged? Are we getting any better at calling them out? And should we be striving for body neutrality instead of comparing ourselves to endless online trends? On today's afternoon episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert is joined by LiSTNR journalist Micaela Savage to explain the #legginglegs trend. Help is always available. If you need support with an eating disorder, or have body image concerns, you can call Butterfly’s National Helpline on 1800 ED HOPE (1800 33 4673), or head to www.butterfly.org.au for more information.

10:59

EP59 - S5

8 Feb 24

You need to calm down - Taylor Swift and the MAGA conspiracy

Taylor Swift is a global superstar. She’s sold over 200 million records and is the highest-grossing female touring artist of all time. And now she’s the subject of a MAGA conspiracy. Donald Trump supporters are spreading the theory Taylor Swift is working with the Democrats to ensure Joe Biden is re-elected at the November US presidential elections. AND they’re going so far as to say her boyfriend, NFL star Travis Kelce, the NFL itself, AND the Pentagon are also part of the wild conspiracies. In this episode of the Briefing, we’re joined by Matt Harris, an associate professor of political science at Park University in the United States to learn how and why Tay Tay is driving the MAGA community to invent these wild theories. Headlines: Workers will be given the ‘right to disconnect’ after hours from their bosses Hamas proposes truce deal Earth Aid Live Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

You need to calm down - Taylor Swift and the MAGA conspiracy

Taylor Swift is a global superstar. She’s sold over 200 million records and is the highest-grossing female touring artist of all time. And now she’s the subject of a MAGA conspiracy. Donald Trump supporters are spreading the theory Taylor Swift is working with the Democrats to ensure Joe Biden is re-elected at the November US presidential elections. AND they’re going so far as to say her boyfriend, NFL star Travis Kelce, the NFL itself, AND the Pentagon are also part of the wild conspiracies. In this episode of the Briefing, we’re joined by Matt Harris, an associate professor of political science at Park University in the United States to learn how and why Tay Tay is driving the MAGA community to invent these wild theories. Headlines: Workers will be given the ‘right to disconnect’ after hours from their bosses Hamas proposes truce deal Earth Aid Live Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

19:56

EP58 - S5

7 Feb 24

Should we get the 'right to disconnect' from work?

How often do you work outside of your paid hours? Are you checking emails, or Teams messages, or taking phone calls when you could be spending that time with loved ones? The Government is looking at giving you the 'right to disconnect', as federal parliament kicks off for 2024 this week. If successful, the new law could mean you get the right to switch off your devices, and refuse to engage with work altogether, out of hours.  Greens Senator Barbara Pocock has been pushing for the right to disconnect for a long time. On today's afternoon episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert speaks with Senator Pocock, as well as employment lawyer Natalie Gaspar, over how the proposed changes would work, and how our lives might change if the law passes.

Should we get the 'right to disconnect' from work?

How often do you work outside of your paid hours? Are you checking emails, or Teams messages, or taking phone calls when you could be spending that time with loved ones? The Government is looking at giving you the 'right to disconnect', as federal parliament kicks off for 2024 this week. If successful, the new law could mean you get the right to switch off your devices, and refuse to engage with work altogether, out of hours.  Greens Senator Barbara Pocock has been pushing for the right to disconnect for a long time. On today's afternoon episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert speaks with Senator Pocock, as well as employment lawyer Natalie Gaspar, over how the proposed changes would work, and how our lives might change if the law passes.

12:46

EP57 - S5

7 Feb 24

How much money you'll get back under the stage 3 tax cuts

The Albanese government’s tax plan will see Australian women taxpayers, on average, receive a tax cut of $1,649 from 1 July. Childcare workers, disability carers and aged care workers are some of the most likely to benefit. In this episode of The Briefing we’re joined by Minister for Women Katy Gallagher to find out how the tax cuts will work and what they mean for you. Headlines: US court rules Donald Trump does not have presidential immunity  Prince Harry returns home to visit King Charles  'Right to switch off’ Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

How much money you'll get back under the stage 3 tax cuts

The Albanese government’s tax plan will see Australian women taxpayers, on average, receive a tax cut of $1,649 from 1 July. Childcare workers, disability carers and aged care workers are some of the most likely to benefit. In this episode of The Briefing we’re joined by Minister for Women Katy Gallagher to find out how the tax cuts will work and what they mean for you. Headlines: US court rules Donald Trump does not have presidential immunity  Prince Harry returns home to visit King Charles  'Right to switch off’ Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

22:13

EP56 - S5

6 Feb 24

Why Australia will be in limbo if King Charles gets too sick to rule

News broke this morning that King Charles has been diagnosed with cancer, with an official release from Buckingham Palace stating that while he "remains wholly positive about his treatment", he will be stepping away from his public-facing duties. Despite the high hopes for the monarch’s future health, the situation has raised concerns over Australia’s lack of regency laws – which cover what happens if the reigning monarch becomes incapacitated.  On today's afternoon episode of The Briefing, Sacha Barbour Gatt speaks with former Independent Senator Rex Patrick to find out the impacts of our lack of regency laws and what it could mean in the unfortunate event that Charles could no longer rule.

Why Australia will be in limbo if King Charles gets too sick to rule

News broke this morning that King Charles has been diagnosed with cancer, with an official release from Buckingham Palace stating that while he "remains wholly positive about his treatment", he will be stepping away from his public-facing duties. Despite the high hopes for the monarch’s future health, the situation has raised concerns over Australia’s lack of regency laws – which cover what happens if the reigning monarch becomes incapacitated.  On today's afternoon episode of The Briefing, Sacha Barbour Gatt speaks with former Independent Senator Rex Patrick to find out the impacts of our lack of regency laws and what it could mean in the unfortunate event that Charles could no longer rule.

11:59

EP55 - S5

6 Feb 24

Why 16,000 livestock are stuck at sea with nowhere to go

16,000 sheep and cattle have been stranded on a ship off the coast of WA for just over a month. The livestock were being exported to the Middle East but the ship was turned back because of the conflict in the Red Sea. Several hundred head of cattle disembarked over the weekend – when temperatures hit the mid-30s. But there are still thousands of animals stranded at sea. In this episode of the Briefing, we take a look at why the live export trade, which is agonisingly cruel to the livestock, is still allowed to occur. Headlines: King Charles has been diagnosed with cancer. Yang Hengjun sentenced to death in China Coalition to support tax cuts Taylor Swift at the Grammys Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Why 16,000 livestock are stuck at sea with nowhere to go

16,000 sheep and cattle have been stranded on a ship off the coast of WA for just over a month. The livestock were being exported to the Middle East but the ship was turned back because of the conflict in the Red Sea. Several hundred head of cattle disembarked over the weekend – when temperatures hit the mid-30s. But there are still thousands of animals stranded at sea. In this episode of the Briefing, we take a look at why the live export trade, which is agonisingly cruel to the livestock, is still allowed to occur. Headlines: King Charles has been diagnosed with cancer. Yang Hengjun sentenced to death in China Coalition to support tax cuts Taylor Swift at the Grammys Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

19:33

EP54 - S5

5 Feb 24

Do police belong at a pride march?

Thousands of people marched down the streets of St Kilda, south of Melbourne, yesterday for the annual Victorian LGBTQIA+ pride march at Midsumma festival.  Queer and ally police officers were among the marchers, joining the celebration when about 50 people tried to block the officers’ way. Some of them were chanting ‘cops kill gays’ and there were banners that read ‘no cops at pride’, with outward aggression from both sides. The conflict has sparked debate over whether police officers should be permitted in pride marches while in uniform. Diane Minnis is a 78er - which means she was at the very first Mardi Gras march in Sydney in 1978, where many queer people were violently thrown into police vehicles and arrested. On today's afternoon edition of The Briefing, Bension Siebert speaks with Diane about her history, what happened over the weekend, and how to build a better future between the queer community and law enforcement.

Do police belong at a pride march?

Thousands of people marched down the streets of St Kilda, south of Melbourne, yesterday for the annual Victorian LGBTQIA+ pride march at Midsumma festival.  Queer and ally police officers were among the marchers, joining the celebration when about 50 people tried to block the officers’ way. Some of them were chanting ‘cops kill gays’ and there were banners that read ‘no cops at pride’, with outward aggression from both sides. The conflict has sparked debate over whether police officers should be permitted in pride marches while in uniform. Diane Minnis is a 78er - which means she was at the very first Mardi Gras march in Sydney in 1978, where many queer people were violently thrown into police vehicles and arrested. On today's afternoon edition of The Briefing, Bension Siebert speaks with Diane about her history, what happened over the weekend, and how to build a better future between the queer community and law enforcement.

12:33

EP53 - S5

5 Feb 24

Could the collapse of China's biggest property developer lead to another GFC??

Evergrande used to be a market giant, and now it's become the poster child of the bust. It received a liquidation order from a Hong Kong court on Monday two years after officially defaulting on public debt. Its collapse is the largest in a crisis that's dragged down China's economic growth and led to a record number of defaults by developers. What is this firm, who is it run by and how did Evergrande become the most significant domino in this event? In this episode of The Briefing we speak with economist Richard Holden to find out, and ask what the implications are for the Australian economy. Headlines: Fuel efficiency standards for Australian cars  US strikes continue Protesters target Police at Melbourne’s Midsumma Pride March Russian cosmonaut sets a record for the longest time spent in space Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Could the collapse of China's biggest property developer lead to another GFC??

Evergrande used to be a market giant, and now it's become the poster child of the bust. It received a liquidation order from a Hong Kong court on Monday two years after officially defaulting on public debt. Its collapse is the largest in a crisis that's dragged down China's economic growth and led to a record number of defaults by developers. What is this firm, who is it run by and how did Evergrande become the most significant domino in this event? In this episode of The Briefing we speak with economist Richard Holden to find out, and ask what the implications are for the Australian economy. Headlines: Fuel efficiency standards for Australian cars  US strikes continue Protesters target Police at Melbourne’s Midsumma Pride March Russian cosmonaut sets a record for the longest time spent in space Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

21:28

EP52 - S5

4 Feb 24

How Caleb Finn became one of the most influential Aussies on social media

Caleb Finn was named the 2nd most influential Australian on social media in 2022, known for his avant-garde, dress-ups, and short horror stories. He has nearly 16 million followers on TikTok and 800k on Instagram. And yet he describes himself as an introvert and doesn’t like to leave the house. In this chat with Antoinette Lattouf Caleb explains how long it takes him to create content and how it’s changed since having a baby. Weekend List: Wicked the musical Aldi insulated tumbler with straw  Going to your local library Listeners recommendations! Keep them coming Send us your Weekend List suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

How Caleb Finn became one of the most influential Aussies on social media

Caleb Finn was named the 2nd most influential Australian on social media in 2022, known for his avant-garde, dress-ups, and short horror stories. He has nearly 16 million followers on TikTok and 800k on Instagram. And yet he describes himself as an introvert and doesn’t like to leave the house. In this chat with Antoinette Lattouf Caleb explains how long it takes him to create content and how it’s changed since having a baby. Weekend List: Wicked the musical Aldi insulated tumbler with straw  Going to your local library Listeners recommendations! Keep them coming Send us your Weekend List suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

27:23

EP51 - S5

2 Feb 24

After 40 years, is Medicare living up to its promise?

Medicare is 40 years old this month, and the little green card is now a ubiquitous presence in our wallets and on our phones. It has become a point of pride for Australians - especially those of us who have ventured over to the United States. But that wasn’t always the case.  The birth of Medicare was fraught; with its first iteration, Medibank, finding a very controversial reception by the public when it was first introduced by Gough Whitlam. In this episode of The Briefing, Sacha Barbour Gatt speaks with Kees Van Gool, a professor of health systems and policy at the University of Sydney, about how it all came together, and what still needs to be improved. 

After 40 years, is Medicare living up to its promise?

Medicare is 40 years old this month, and the little green card is now a ubiquitous presence in our wallets and on our phones. It has become a point of pride for Australians - especially those of us who have ventured over to the United States. But that wasn’t always the case.  The birth of Medicare was fraught; with its first iteration, Medibank, finding a very controversial reception by the public when it was first introduced by Gough Whitlam. In this episode of The Briefing, Sacha Barbour Gatt speaks with Kees Van Gool, a professor of health systems and policy at the University of Sydney, about how it all came together, and what still needs to be improved. 

12:19

EP50 - S5

2 Feb 24

New Year’s resolution already failed? Here’s why

Up to 80 percent of new years resolutions fail by the end of January. So what is our obsession with starting fresh in the new year? Dr Gordon Spence from the University of Sydney sits down with Sacha Barber Gatt to reveal what tools you can use to help change your habits and why so many people become unstuck. Headlines: US to launch air strikes on Iran-backed militia group AEC releases the who's who of political donations Universal music has been taken off TikTok Chinese spy pigeon is set free by Indian authorities Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

New Year’s resolution already failed? Here’s why

Up to 80 percent of new years resolutions fail by the end of January. So what is our obsession with starting fresh in the new year? Dr Gordon Spence from the University of Sydney sits down with Sacha Barber Gatt to reveal what tools you can use to help change your habits and why so many people become unstuck. Headlines: US to launch air strikes on Iran-backed militia group AEC releases the who's who of political donations Universal music has been taken off TikTok Chinese spy pigeon is set free by Indian authorities Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

18:58

EP49 - S5

1 Feb 24

The spicy legal battle over who really invented butter chicken

For many Australians, Indian food equals butter chicken. It’s delicious and creamy and it’s incredibly popular here and across the world.  But it hasn’t been around forever – in fact, it’s less than 100 years old. And now, a fight over exactly who invented butter chicken and when has erupted in India’s high court, with two families - and two restaurants - battling it out for bragging rights. On today's afternoon episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert is joined by Delhi chef and food writer, Sadaf Hussain, to hear more about what's been going on.

The spicy legal battle over who really invented butter chicken

For many Australians, Indian food equals butter chicken. It’s delicious and creamy and it’s incredibly popular here and across the world.  But it hasn’t been around forever – in fact, it’s less than 100 years old. And now, a fight over exactly who invented butter chicken and when has erupted in India’s high court, with two families - and two restaurants - battling it out for bragging rights. On today's afternoon episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert is joined by Delhi chef and food writer, Sadaf Hussain, to hear more about what's been going on.

11:29

EP48 - S5

1 Feb 24

Inside the hunt for the spy who betrayed Australia

The latest series in the Secrets We Keep podcast is called “Nest of Traitors” and follows LiSTNR journalist Joey Watson’s three-year journey to find the spy who betrayed Australia. During the Cold War an Australian spy turned to work for the enemy, providing intel to the KGB and potentially sabotaging ASIO from the inside. In this episode of The Briefing, Joey Watson sits down with Sacha Barbour Gatt to talk through his journey into a world of deception Headlines: Tech firms face US Senate hearing Millions of songs are being pulled from Tiktok States fight for more school funding Medicare is turning 40 today Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Inside the hunt for the spy who betrayed Australia

The latest series in the Secrets We Keep podcast is called “Nest of Traitors” and follows LiSTNR journalist Joey Watson’s three-year journey to find the spy who betrayed Australia. During the Cold War an Australian spy turned to work for the enemy, providing intel to the KGB and potentially sabotaging ASIO from the inside. In this episode of The Briefing, Joey Watson sits down with Sacha Barbour Gatt to talk through his journey into a world of deception Headlines: Tech firms face US Senate hearing Millions of songs are being pulled from Tiktok States fight for more school funding Medicare is turning 40 today Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

23:47

EP47 - S5

31 Jan 24

Is recycling in Australia just rubbish?

Most of us try to do the right thing with recycling. We sort our rubbish into plastics, cardboard and paper, and our landfill waste, in the hope we’re saving the planet.  But there have been reports of recyclable waste ending up in landfill, or even being shipped overseas for processing (that’s quite a carbon footprint).  So The Briefing team decided to do our own experiment, placing trackable AirTags into plastic bottles at locations across Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and the Central Coast to see where they ended up.   On today's afternoon episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert speaks with LiSTNR Investigations Editor, Clair Weaver, to unpack what was found. 

Is recycling in Australia just rubbish?

Most of us try to do the right thing with recycling. We sort our rubbish into plastics, cardboard and paper, and our landfill waste, in the hope we’re saving the planet.  But there have been reports of recyclable waste ending up in landfill, or even being shipped overseas for processing (that’s quite a carbon footprint).  So The Briefing team decided to do our own experiment, placing trackable AirTags into plastic bottles at locations across Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and the Central Coast to see where they ended up.   On today's afternoon episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert speaks with LiSTNR Investigations Editor, Clair Weaver, to unpack what was found. 

11:58

EP46 - S5

31 Jan 24

How Australia's 'Stop the boats' policy got exported to the UK

UK Prime Minister Rishi Sunak is trying to pass a bill that would allow the UK to deport refugees, asylum seekers and illegal immigrants to Rwanda. The inspiration for the idea has come from Australia and our use of third-party countries like Nauru to deal with illegal immigrants. The policy is extremely controversial, it was initially launched by Boris Johnson in April 2022, and was then struck down by the Supreme Court over safety concerns. Bension Siebert is joined by Jill Rutter, Director of Strategy and Relationships at the UK think tank British Future, to explain the bill. Headlines: December retail spending dips US President has decided on response after soldier deaths New Zealand is banning PFAS in make up products Channel Nine apologises after altering politician image Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

How Australia's 'Stop the boats' policy got exported to the UK

UK Prime Minister Rishi Sunak is trying to pass a bill that would allow the UK to deport refugees, asylum seekers and illegal immigrants to Rwanda. The inspiration for the idea has come from Australia and our use of third-party countries like Nauru to deal with illegal immigrants. The policy is extremely controversial, it was initially launched by Boris Johnson in April 2022, and was then struck down by the Supreme Court over safety concerns. Bension Siebert is joined by Jill Rutter, Director of Strategy and Relationships at the UK think tank British Future, to explain the bill. Headlines: December retail spending dips US President has decided on response after soldier deaths New Zealand is banning PFAS in make up products Channel Nine apologises after altering politician image Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

22:00

EP45 - S5

30 Jan 24

How worried should you be about neo-Nazism in Australia?

While a neo-Nazi demonstration was shut down in Sydney over the Australia Day long weekend, this isn't the only time that white supremacist groups have made the news recently. Last month a group of masked men marched through Ballarat chanting that 'Australia is for the white man', while earlier last year, about 30 men repeatedly performed the Nazi salute during an anti-trans rally.  So how worried should you be about neo-Nazism in Australia?   Nick McKenzie is one of Australia's most renowned investigative journalists, with an extensive knowledge of how white supremacist groups operate in Australia. On today's afternoon episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert is joined by Nick to find out more about the current situation and the threat that they pose. 

How worried should you be about neo-Nazism in Australia?

While a neo-Nazi demonstration was shut down in Sydney over the Australia Day long weekend, this isn't the only time that white supremacist groups have made the news recently. Last month a group of masked men marched through Ballarat chanting that 'Australia is for the white man', while earlier last year, about 30 men repeatedly performed the Nazi salute during an anti-trans rally.  So how worried should you be about neo-Nazism in Australia?   Nick McKenzie is one of Australia's most renowned investigative journalists, with an extensive knowledge of how white supremacist groups operate in Australia. On today's afternoon episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert is joined by Nick to find out more about the current situation and the threat that they pose. 

12:01

EP44 - S5

30 Jan 24

Christian Hull on the nine-month cruise blowing up TikTok

A ship called The Serenade of the Seas has embarked on a nine-month cruise, visiting more than 60 countries across all seven continents. It's being hailed as the world's longest cruise, and it gained notoriety when passengers began posting on TikTok - and it's now gone completely viral. In this episode of The Briefing, we're joined by Christian Hull, comedian, YouTuber and host of the Complete Drivel podcast here at LiSTNR, to find out why the cruise is taking the world by storm. Headlines: New poll shows what we think of Albanese's tax cuts Rental listings drop to record low Another La Nina event possible this year King Charles and Princess Kate leave hospital Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Christian Hull on the nine-month cruise blowing up TikTok

A ship called The Serenade of the Seas has embarked on a nine-month cruise, visiting more than 60 countries across all seven continents. It's being hailed as the world's longest cruise, and it gained notoriety when passengers began posting on TikTok - and it's now gone completely viral. In this episode of The Briefing, we're joined by Christian Hull, comedian, YouTuber and host of the Complete Drivel podcast here at LiSTNR, to find out why the cruise is taking the world by storm. Headlines: New poll shows what we think of Albanese's tax cuts Rental listings drop to record low Another La Nina event possible this year King Charles and Princess Kate leave hospital Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

22:03

EP43 - S5

29 Jan 24

AI can now predict future events in human lives

The potential for artificial intelligence is indisputable. Though it has just been over a year since Chat GPT launched, now over 100 million people use the site weekly. But how far could the technology go? Could AI accurately predict the future? Some Danish researchers believe that it already can. In a published study, they've taken the principles of large language models, like Chat GPT, and applied it to data of Denmark's 6 million people, predicting with 78% accuracy aspects such as personality and behaviour, and even the likelihood of death within a given timeframe. In today's afternoon episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert speaks with lead author and researcher, Professor Sune Lehmann, about what the study found, and what it could mean for the future.

AI can now predict future events in human lives

The potential for artificial intelligence is indisputable. Though it has just been over a year since Chat GPT launched, now over 100 million people use the site weekly. But how far could the technology go? Could AI accurately predict the future? Some Danish researchers believe that it already can. In a published study, they've taken the principles of large language models, like Chat GPT, and applied it to data of Denmark's 6 million people, predicting with 78% accuracy aspects such as personality and behaviour, and even the likelihood of death within a given timeframe. In today's afternoon episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert speaks with lead author and researcher, Professor Sune Lehmann, about what the study found, and what it could mean for the future.

11:04

EP42 - S5

29 Jan 24

Is a private school education worth the money?

With annual fees pushing $50,000 at Australia's costliest elite private schools in 2024, it's time to look at what the data says on student performance in the big private vs public school debate. Is it actually worth sending a child to private school? What do they get for that eye-watering amount? Or is public education a better option, even if they don't have the fancy tennis courts and plunge pool? In this episode of The Briefing, authors David Gillespie and Jane Caro reveal what the evidence tells us on what factors actually matter in getting the best education for a child in Australia today. Headlines: Jannick Sinner wins Aus Open First US service men killed in Gaza Neo-nazis warned they could be unmasked Activists throw soup at Mona Lisa Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Is a private school education worth the money?

With annual fees pushing $50,000 at Australia's costliest elite private schools in 2024, it's time to look at what the data says on student performance in the big private vs public school debate. Is it actually worth sending a child to private school? What do they get for that eye-watering amount? Or is public education a better option, even if they don't have the fancy tennis courts and plunge pool? In this episode of The Briefing, authors David Gillespie and Jane Caro reveal what the evidence tells us on what factors actually matter in getting the best education for a child in Australia today. Headlines: Jannick Sinner wins Aus Open First US service men killed in Gaza Neo-nazis warned they could be unmasked Activists throw soup at Mona Lisa Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

20:54

EP41 - S5

28 Jan 24

Our first female Muslim boxer, Tina Rahimi, is going to the Olympics

Tina Rahimi is one of the 12 boxers who have been selected to represent Australia at the Paris Olympics this year. She’s already made history without stepping into the ring. The Sydney sider is our first female Muslim boxer to make it to the Olympics. In this chat with Antoinette Lattouf Tina explains how she went from a makeup artist to boxer in a few years, going on to win a bronze medal at the Commonwealth Games. Weekend List: Dubai Bling on Netflix SBS on Demand Always Was,  Always Will Be Love on the spectrum season 2 on Netflix Send us your Weekend List suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

Our first female Muslim boxer, Tina Rahimi, is going to the Olympics

Tina Rahimi is one of the 12 boxers who have been selected to represent Australia at the Paris Olympics this year. She’s already made history without stepping into the ring. The Sydney sider is our first female Muslim boxer to make it to the Olympics. In this chat with Antoinette Lattouf Tina explains how she went from a makeup artist to boxer in a few years, going on to win a bronze medal at the Commonwealth Games. Weekend List: Dubai Bling on Netflix SBS on Demand Always Was,  Always Will Be Love on the spectrum season 2 on Netflix Send us your Weekend List suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

32:30

EP40 - S5

26 Jan 24

Three powerful stories that show us what Australia Day means in 2024

What does January 26 really mean to ordinary Australians in 2024?  Yevheniia Cherkasova found safety in Melbourne after she fled the war in Ukraine with her now-16-year-old sister, making a home here for almost two years. Jeffrey 'Yello' Simon-Ullungurra grew up on the Tiwi Islands, north of Darwin. He’s been looking for new ways to reconcile First Nations and Australian identities, and how to help his country heal. Michael Kheirallah witnessed a dramatic change in his Lebanese migrant community this year, as they process feelings of regret over the Voice referendum, and fear over war in the Middle East. Speaking with Bension Siebert, they each reflect on what Australia Day means to them in 2024.

Three powerful stories that show us what Australia Day means in 2024

What does January 26 really mean to ordinary Australians in 2024?  Yevheniia Cherkasova found safety in Melbourne after she fled the war in Ukraine with her now-16-year-old sister, making a home here for almost two years. Jeffrey 'Yello' Simon-Ullungurra grew up on the Tiwi Islands, north of Darwin. He’s been looking for new ways to reconcile First Nations and Australian identities, and how to help his country heal. Michael Kheirallah witnessed a dramatic change in his Lebanese migrant community this year, as they process feelings of regret over the Voice referendum, and fear over war in the Middle East. Speaking with Bension Siebert, they each reflect on what Australia Day means to them in 2024.

16:00

EP39 - S5

26 Jan 24

How the Voice referendum impacts our attitude to Australia Day

This year’s Australia Day comes after the defeat of the indigenous Voice to parliament last year - and the decision by a number of big retailers to stop stocking Australia Day merchandise. The question for many Australian’s over whether we should be celebrating on January 26 is still in debate. In this episode of The Briefing, ANU’s Frank Bongiorno speaks with us about Australia Day’s difficult history.

How the Voice referendum impacts our attitude to Australia Day

This year’s Australia Day comes after the defeat of the indigenous Voice to parliament last year - and the decision by a number of big retailers to stop stocking Australia Day merchandise. The question for many Australian’s over whether we should be celebrating on January 26 is still in debate. In this episode of The Briefing, ANU’s Frank Bongiorno speaks with us about Australia Day’s difficult history.

16:18

EP38 - S5

25 Jan 24

Luke and Sassy Scott on becoming a parent through overseas surrogacy

There are many ways in Australia to have children if you can’t physically procreate. You can foster or look into adoption - or you can find a surrogate.  In Australia, it’s illegal to pay someone to carry a child for you – but nothing is stopping you from paying someone overseas. However, surrogacy isn't without contention or is an easy road - just this month the head of the Catholic Church, Pope Francis, described surrogacy as 'deplorable'.  Luke O’Halloran and Scott O’Halloran, otherwise known asLuke and Sassy Scott, are brothers with a massive public profile, with their podcast and TikTok presence amassing a plethora of fans here and overseas.   Last year Scott and his partner Marcusdecided to become parents via international surrogacy. On today's afternoon episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert sits down with Luke and Sassy Scott to find out firsthand about the experience.

Luke and Sassy Scott on becoming a parent through overseas surrogacy

There are many ways in Australia to have children if you can’t physically procreate. You can foster or look into adoption - or you can find a surrogate.  In Australia, it’s illegal to pay someone to carry a child for you – but nothing is stopping you from paying someone overseas. However, surrogacy isn't without contention or is an easy road - just this month the head of the Catholic Church, Pope Francis, described surrogacy as 'deplorable'.  Luke O’Halloran and Scott O’Halloran, otherwise known asLuke and Sassy Scott, are brothers with a massive public profile, with their podcast and TikTok presence amassing a plethora of fans here and overseas.   Last year Scott and his partner Marcusdecided to become parents via international surrogacy. On today's afternoon episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert sits down with Luke and Sassy Scott to find out firsthand about the experience.

17:36

EP37 - S5

25 Jan 24

Forget Margot Robbie. Meet the Aussie who is nominated for an Oscar

Our chat with Nicky Bentham, an Australian movie producer living and working in London.  Nicky’s been nominated for an Academy Award for her work producing the short film ‘The After’.  In this episode of The Briefing, we talk with Nicky about what it’s like to get the call to say you’re nominated, what it means for her career, and what she expects to happen on the big night. 

Forget Margot Robbie. Meet the Aussie who is nominated for an Oscar

Our chat with Nicky Bentham, an Australian movie producer living and working in London.  Nicky’s been nominated for an Academy Award for her work producing the short film ‘The After’.  In this episode of The Briefing, we talk with Nicky about what it’s like to get the call to say you’re nominated, what it means for her career, and what she expects to happen on the big night. 

10:01

EP36 - S5

25 Jan 24

Crypto had a big year in 2023. What's in store in 2024?

We stare into the crystal ball to see what's in cryptocurrency's future in 2024. Last year saw the notorious high-profile crypto court cases involving Sam Bankman-Fried and Changpeng Zhao. But despite the downfall of two of the currency's biggest players, crypto ended the year 160 percent up on 2022. In this episode of The Briefing, we're joined by Dr Dimitrios Salampasis, a financial technologies expert from Swinburne University, to find out what's in store for crypto in 2024. Headlines:  Changes to stage three tax cuts  Cyclone Kirrily set to make landfall IVF could save the northern white rhino Steve Smith joins call to "change the date" Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Crypto had a big year in 2023. What's in store in 2024?

We stare into the crystal ball to see what's in cryptocurrency's future in 2024. Last year saw the notorious high-profile crypto court cases involving Sam Bankman-Fried and Changpeng Zhao. But despite the downfall of two of the currency's biggest players, crypto ended the year 160 percent up on 2022. In this episode of The Briefing, we're joined by Dr Dimitrios Salampasis, a financial technologies expert from Swinburne University, to find out what's in store for crypto in 2024. Headlines:  Changes to stage three tax cuts  Cyclone Kirrily set to make landfall IVF could save the northern white rhino Steve Smith joins call to "change the date" Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

23:24

EP35 - S5

24 Jan 24

Why the biggest election year in world history threatens democracy

2024 will be the largest single election year in human history, with voters representing more than 40 per cent of the world’s population going to the polls this year.   Fascist, authoritarian and strong-man candidates are candidates in many of those elections – threatening no less than the future of democracy.  We take democracy for granted, but democracies can actually be very fragile.  On today's afternoon episode of The Briefing, Sacha Barbour Gatt and Bension Siebert unpack the world’s biggest election year, and what it might mean for the future of democracy. 

Why the biggest election year in world history threatens democracy

2024 will be the largest single election year in human history, with voters representing more than 40 per cent of the world’s population going to the polls this year.   Fascist, authoritarian and strong-man candidates are candidates in many of those elections – threatening no less than the future of democracy.  We take democracy for granted, but democracies can actually be very fragile.  On today's afternoon episode of The Briefing, Sacha Barbour Gatt and Bension Siebert unpack the world’s biggest election year, and what it might mean for the future of democracy. 

09:56

EP34 - S5

24 Jan 24

Google it: How 'doing your own research' can make you believe anything

If you've been online at all in the last decade, you would've seen the phrase 'do your own research' in likely hundreds of comments sections. It turns out 'doing your own research' is precisely what can lead you to believing something untrue, according to a new study from the University of Central Florida. In this episode of The Briefing we speak with lead author Kevin Aslett about why we're more likely to believe misinformation even if we try to verify it. Headlines: Scott Morrison announces retirement from politics Labor caucus meets to discuss stage three tax cuts Voting opens in New Hampshire primaries Margot Robbie snubbed in Oscars nominations Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Google it: How 'doing your own research' can make you believe anything

If you've been online at all in the last decade, you would've seen the phrase 'do your own research' in likely hundreds of comments sections. It turns out 'doing your own research' is precisely what can lead you to believing something untrue, according to a new study from the University of Central Florida. In this episode of The Briefing we speak with lead author Kevin Aslett about why we're more likely to believe misinformation even if we try to verify it. Headlines: Scott Morrison announces retirement from politics Labor caucus meets to discuss stage three tax cuts Voting opens in New Hampshire primaries Margot Robbie snubbed in Oscars nominations Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

20:14

EP33 - S5

23 Jan 24

Scott Morrison has officially announced that he'll retire from politics

Scomo is finally calling it – the former PM announced today he will be stepping down from federal parliament. It closes a wild chapter in Australian political history.  Most Australians came to know him as Immigration Minister in 2013, but Scott Morrison got the top job when he toppled Malcolm Turnbull to become Prime Minister in 2018.  As PM, he came to grief over a badly timed holiday to Hawaii while much of Australia burned in the 2019-2020 bushfires. He also gained a reputation for secrecy, famously signing the massive AUKUS submarine deal with the United States and Britain, snubbing France along the way. He led the country through the COVID crisis. And finally lost the prime ministership when Anthony Albanese’s Labor Party defeated the Coalition in 2022.   Bension Siebert is joined by Tom McIlroy, federal political correspondent for the Australian Financial Review, to reflect on today's news, Scott Morrison's political journey and the legacy he leaves behind.

Scott Morrison has officially announced that he'll retire from politics

Scomo is finally calling it – the former PM announced today he will be stepping down from federal parliament. It closes a wild chapter in Australian political history.  Most Australians came to know him as Immigration Minister in 2013, but Scott Morrison got the top job when he toppled Malcolm Turnbull to become Prime Minister in 2018.  As PM, he came to grief over a badly timed holiday to Hawaii while much of Australia burned in the 2019-2020 bushfires. He also gained a reputation for secrecy, famously signing the massive AUKUS submarine deal with the United States and Britain, snubbing France along the way. He led the country through the COVID crisis. And finally lost the prime ministership when Anthony Albanese’s Labor Party defeated the Coalition in 2022.   Bension Siebert is joined by Tom McIlroy, federal political correspondent for the Australian Financial Review, to reflect on today's news, Scott Morrison's political journey and the legacy he leaves behind.

10:51

EP32 - S5

23 Jan 24

Can the government force supermarkets to lower their prices, and should it?

Grocery prices have been sky-rocketing. A brief trip to the supermarket for just a handful of items can cost a small fortune. The Federal Government has announced it is holding a review into grocery prices in its bid to reduce cost of living pressure. In this episode of The Briefing, we're joined by Tim Harcourt and Gary Mortimer to ask 'can the government actually force supermarkets to lower the prices and should it?' Headlines: Stage three tax cuts under debate Sexual violence cases under review ABC’s managing director caves to staff pressure An Aussie licence plate to sell for $10 million Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Can the government force supermarkets to lower their prices, and should it?

Grocery prices have been sky-rocketing. A brief trip to the supermarket for just a handful of items can cost a small fortune. The Federal Government has announced it is holding a review into grocery prices in its bid to reduce cost of living pressure. In this episode of The Briefing, we're joined by Tim Harcourt and Gary Mortimer to ask 'can the government actually force supermarkets to lower the prices and should it?' Headlines: Stage three tax cuts under debate Sexual violence cases under review ABC’s managing director caves to staff pressure An Aussie licence plate to sell for $10 million Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

24:06

EP31 - S5

22 Jan 24

How 'sponge cities' could help us reduce the destruction of floods

With parts of the Northern Territory experiencing the ongoing impacts of devastating floods across summer, Far North Queensland is again bracing for heavy rainfall from the currently developing Tropical Cyclone Kirrily. These weather events are nothing new - they follow a long list of devastating floods that have plagued the country over the last few years. But could a sponge city be the best way to tackle future flooding across the country? Also known as water sensitive urban design, these building principles involve using soft materials like plants, or water catchment techniques, instead of hard surfaces like concrete, to absorb water rather than repel water. On this episode of The Briefing, Simon Beaton speaks with Swinburne Professor of Architecture and Urban Design, Marcus White, to find out whether these design principles could be better utilised in Australia. 

How 'sponge cities' could help us reduce the destruction of floods

With parts of the Northern Territory experiencing the ongoing impacts of devastating floods across summer, Far North Queensland is again bracing for heavy rainfall from the currently developing Tropical Cyclone Kirrily. These weather events are nothing new - they follow a long list of devastating floods that have plagued the country over the last few years. But could a sponge city be the best way to tackle future flooding across the country? Also known as water sensitive urban design, these building principles involve using soft materials like plants, or water catchment techniques, instead of hard surfaces like concrete, to absorb water rather than repel water. On this episode of The Briefing, Simon Beaton speaks with Swinburne Professor of Architecture and Urban Design, Marcus White, to find out whether these design principles could be better utilised in Australia. 

10:35

EP30 - S5

22 Jan 24

Why King Charles' prostate is a reminder to check your balls

Buckingham Palace has announced King Charles will have a procedure on his prostate. The news prompted an 11-fold increase in internet searches for 'enlarged prostate'. Men all over the world are renowned for ignoring their health and their reluctance to be tested for critical health diagnoses. Why? In this episode of The Briefing, we speak with Jonathon Papadopoulo, who was diagnosed with testicular cancer in his 20s, about what prompted him to get checked, and what an early diagnosis meant for his chances of surviving. Headlines: Gas deal locked in by the federal government Gaza death toll hits 25,000 De Minaur knocked out of Aus Open Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Why King Charles' prostate is a reminder to check your balls

Buckingham Palace has announced King Charles will have a procedure on his prostate. The news prompted an 11-fold increase in internet searches for 'enlarged prostate'. Men all over the world are renowned for ignoring their health and their reluctance to be tested for critical health diagnoses. Why? In this episode of The Briefing, we speak with Jonathon Papadopoulo, who was diagnosed with testicular cancer in his 20s, about what prompted him to get checked, and what an early diagnosis meant for his chances of surviving. Headlines: Gas deal locked in by the federal government Gaza death toll hits 25,000 De Minaur knocked out of Aus Open Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

18:28

EP29 - S5

21 Jan 24

The reality of being Australia’s best new radio talent

Breakfast radio is brutal. The 4am wake ups, the competition, trying to stay at top of the ratings and unpredictable talkback callers. But Laura O’Callaghan just loves it In 2021 Loz joined Roo and Ditz on Triple M brekky in Adelaide and she’s then has made her mark taking home best new talent at the commercial radio awards last year. In this chat Antoinette Lattouf, Loz explains what it’s really like being a women in radio especially on a pretty blokey show. Weekend List: Boy Swallows Universe on Netflix Trent Dalton interview with Jamila Rizvi Mean Girls the new movie in cinemas  Mini Bands workout inspo  Hell Camp: Teen Nightmare on Netflix Send us your Weekend List suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

The reality of being Australia’s best new radio talent

Breakfast radio is brutal. The 4am wake ups, the competition, trying to stay at top of the ratings and unpredictable talkback callers. But Laura O’Callaghan just loves it In 2021 Loz joined Roo and Ditz on Triple M brekky in Adelaide and she’s then has made her mark taking home best new talent at the commercial radio awards last year. In this chat Antoinette Lattouf, Loz explains what it’s really like being a women in radio especially on a pretty blokey show. Weekend List: Boy Swallows Universe on Netflix Trent Dalton interview with Jamila Rizvi Mean Girls the new movie in cinemas  Mini Bands workout inspo  Hell Camp: Teen Nightmare on Netflix Send us your Weekend List suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

31:25

EP28 - S5

19 Jan 24

Behind the unexpected rebirth of the magazine

We’ve all heard the term ‘print is dead’, but is it? Turns out the magazine sector continues to have a loyal consumer base, in fact seeing growth in Australia through 2023. And it isn't just the same old magazines that maintain popularity - we've seen the launch of new products, as well as the rebirth of previously discontinued magazines such as Girlfriend. So what is it about the magazine? The nostalgic experience? The aesthetic of reading on paper instead of on a digital platform? The focus on a niche subject matter? In this episode of The Briefing, Antoinette Lattouf speaks with Literature and Digital Media Expert, Dr Julian Novitz from Swinburne University, to find out what's going on.

Behind the unexpected rebirth of the magazine

We’ve all heard the term ‘print is dead’, but is it? Turns out the magazine sector continues to have a loyal consumer base, in fact seeing growth in Australia through 2023. And it isn't just the same old magazines that maintain popularity - we've seen the launch of new products, as well as the rebirth of previously discontinued magazines such as Girlfriend. So what is it about the magazine? The nostalgic experience? The aesthetic of reading on paper instead of on a digital platform? The focus on a niche subject matter? In this episode of The Briefing, Antoinette Lattouf speaks with Literature and Digital Media Expert, Dr Julian Novitz from Swinburne University, to find out what's going on.

13:00

EP27 - S5

19 Jan 24

Can Australia ever stop drug overdoses at music festivals?

Earlier this month, nine people were hospitalised with hyperthermia (extreme overheating) after taking MDMA in the sweltering heat at Hardmission Festival. A recent study found that since 2000 there have been over 64 drug related deaths at musical festivals. Bension Siebert sat down with Dr David Caldicott to talk us through the scientific evidence for what works and what doesn't in preventing overdoses at festivals. Headlines: UN to review Palestinian refugee operations Uvalde Texas school shooting report handed down Disappointing day at the Australian Open Pope talks sex Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Can Australia ever stop drug overdoses at music festivals?

Earlier this month, nine people were hospitalised with hyperthermia (extreme overheating) after taking MDMA in the sweltering heat at Hardmission Festival. A recent study found that since 2000 there have been over 64 drug related deaths at musical festivals. Bension Siebert sat down with Dr David Caldicott to talk us through the scientific evidence for what works and what doesn't in preventing overdoses at festivals. Headlines: UN to review Palestinian refugee operations Uvalde Texas school shooting report handed down Disappointing day at the Australian Open Pope talks sex Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

22:04

EP26 - S5

18 Jan 24

Former Human Rights Watch head on journalistic censorship and the ABC

In the middle of a short backfill contract on ABC Radio Sydney late last year, journalist Antoinette Lattouf was abruptly sacked for sharing a Human Rights Watch post about Israel using starvation as a weapon of war. Now, Antoinette is taking the ABC to Fair Work Australia, claiming wrongful termination. With a private mediation hearing ending today without resolution, she says she will "fight for as long as it takes", and “will always advocate and fight for an ABC that can operate and inform the masses, inform and entertain the masses without fear or favour". In this episode of The Briefing, Sacha Barbour Gatt speaks with former executive director of Human Rights Watch Kenneth Roth about her co-host's sacking, and if the ABC's decision risks censoring journalism. 

Former Human Rights Watch head on journalistic censorship and the ABC

In the middle of a short backfill contract on ABC Radio Sydney late last year, journalist Antoinette Lattouf was abruptly sacked for sharing a Human Rights Watch post about Israel using starvation as a weapon of war. Now, Antoinette is taking the ABC to Fair Work Australia, claiming wrongful termination. With a private mediation hearing ending today without resolution, she says she will "fight for as long as it takes", and “will always advocate and fight for an ABC that can operate and inform the masses, inform and entertain the masses without fear or favour". In this episode of The Briefing, Sacha Barbour Gatt speaks with former executive director of Human Rights Watch Kenneth Roth about her co-host's sacking, and if the ABC's decision risks censoring journalism. 

14:04

EP25 - S5

18 Jan 24

The rise and rise of ketamine

Ketamine use is growing among young Australian party and festival goers as a cut-price alternative to drugs like cocaine and ecstacy. National wastewater monitoring has found consumption of ketamine rose to a record high last year, but it comes with serious risks. In this episode of The Briefing, we're joined by Dr Monica Barratt, a social scientist at the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre at the University of New South Wales to find out what the risks are, and how to cope with the drug's side effects. Headlines: US to redesignate Houthis as terrorists King Charles to undergo prostate treatment Atlassian shows WFH policy has not hit productivity Djokovic slams crowd during tough Aus Open match Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

The rise and rise of ketamine

Ketamine use is growing among young Australian party and festival goers as a cut-price alternative to drugs like cocaine and ecstacy. National wastewater monitoring has found consumption of ketamine rose to a record high last year, but it comes with serious risks. In this episode of The Briefing, we're joined by Dr Monica Barratt, a social scientist at the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre at the University of New South Wales to find out what the risks are, and how to cope with the drug's side effects. Headlines: US to redesignate Houthis as terrorists King Charles to undergo prostate treatment Atlassian shows WFH policy has not hit productivity Djokovic slams crowd during tough Aus Open match Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

22:46

EP24 - S5

17 Jan 24

Meet Sonny Rennison, Australia's first wheelchair ballkid

With all eyes on Melbourne as the Australian Open takes off, now is the time when so many of us go into tennis fever. But this year, get ready to see something completely new. 11-year-old Sonny Rennison is an upcoming superstar in the world of wheelchair tennis, already ranked 15th in the world. Now, Sonny is working with Mastercard to serve up Australia’s first wheelchair ballkid pilot program. With their support, Sonny co-created some nifty technology to help him undertake the role at the high standard required.  On this episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert speaks with Sonny Rennison, as well as one of Australia's top wheelchair tennis stars, Heath Davidson, about the importance of increasing accessibility for athletes with disability.

Meet Sonny Rennison, Australia's first wheelchair ballkid

With all eyes on Melbourne as the Australian Open takes off, now is the time when so many of us go into tennis fever. But this year, get ready to see something completely new. 11-year-old Sonny Rennison is an upcoming superstar in the world of wheelchair tennis, already ranked 15th in the world. Now, Sonny is working with Mastercard to serve up Australia’s first wheelchair ballkid pilot program. With their support, Sonny co-created some nifty technology to help him undertake the role at the high standard required.  On this episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert speaks with Sonny Rennison, as well as one of Australia's top wheelchair tennis stars, Heath Davidson, about the importance of increasing accessibility for athletes with disability.

10:06

EP23 - S5

17 Jan 24

Who are the Houthis and why is Australia getting involved?

Ships in the Red Sea are increasingly coming under attack from Houthis rebels. The Iranian-backed, Yemen-based group has threatened to continue the attacks in a bid to disrupt ships from delivering goods to and from Israel, prompting the US, UK and Australia to carry out strikes against the Houthis. Sacha Barbour Gatt is joined by Middle East expert Sarah Phillips from the University of Sydney to explain who the rebel group are and how their attacks could lead to a wider conflict with the western world. Headlines: Trump in court after Iowa Wong vows to double humanitarian aid to Palestinian territories The 2023 Emmy Awards Checking in with Antoinette Lattouf Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Who are the Houthis and why is Australia getting involved?

Ships in the Red Sea are increasingly coming under attack from Houthis rebels. The Iranian-backed, Yemen-based group has threatened to continue the attacks in a bid to disrupt ships from delivering goods to and from Israel, prompting the US, UK and Australia to carry out strikes against the Houthis. Sacha Barbour Gatt is joined by Middle East expert Sarah Phillips from the University of Sydney to explain who the rebel group are and how their attacks could lead to a wider conflict with the western world. Headlines: Trump in court after Iowa Wong vows to double humanitarian aid to Palestinian territories The 2023 Emmy Awards Checking in with Antoinette Lattouf Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

20:06

EP22 - S5

16 Jan 24

How could we better look after those with dementia?

Dementia is the second leading cause of death of all Australians, with more than 400,000 people currently living with the disease in 2024. It can be a horrendous thing to watch a loved one go through, with the impact of the disease on both the individual and those who love them immense.  Exploring this experience forms the core element of independent movie maker Jonathan De Jong's latest project, Human Forever. In this episode of The Briefing, Sacha Barbour-Gatt sits down with Jonathon to hear about the documentary, which tells the gripping story of 24-year-old Teun, who resides in the closed ward of a nursing home alongside people with dementia – seeking answers about life, ageing, and the uncharted territories of the future.

How could we better look after those with dementia?

Dementia is the second leading cause of death of all Australians, with more than 400,000 people currently living with the disease in 2024. It can be a horrendous thing to watch a loved one go through, with the impact of the disease on both the individual and those who love them immense.  Exploring this experience forms the core element of independent movie maker Jonathan De Jong's latest project, Human Forever. In this episode of The Briefing, Sacha Barbour-Gatt sits down with Jonathon to hear about the documentary, which tells the gripping story of 24-year-old Teun, who resides in the closed ward of a nursing home alongside people with dementia – seeking answers about life, ageing, and the uncharted territories of the future.

12:07

EP21 - S5

16 Jan 24

Inside the first day of Donald Trump's race for the White House

The 2024 race to the White House begins today in lowa. The upper mid-west state hosts the first Caucuses of the Presidential election campaign. Donald Trump hopes to secure enough votes to force his rivals to pull out of the race. Ron DeSantis and Nikki Haley hope to put a dent in Trump's momentum. Sacha Barbour Gatt is joined by Chas Licciardello, host of the ABC's Planet America, to explain why the lowa Caucus is so importent in the race to the White House. Headlines: New dangerous party drugs Houthi rebels attack American-owned ship Australia's richest get richer Great day for Australia at the Aussie Open  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Inside the first day of Donald Trump's race for the White House

The 2024 race to the White House begins today in lowa. The upper mid-west state hosts the first Caucuses of the Presidential election campaign. Donald Trump hopes to secure enough votes to force his rivals to pull out of the race. Ron DeSantis and Nikki Haley hope to put a dent in Trump's momentum. Sacha Barbour Gatt is joined by Chas Licciardello, host of the ABC's Planet America, to explain why the lowa Caucus is so importent in the race to the White House. Headlines: New dangerous party drugs Houthi rebels attack American-owned ship Australia's richest get richer Great day for Australia at the Aussie Open  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

19:51

EP20 - S5

15 Jan 24

Why does Taiwan's election result matter to the rest of the world?

The recent election in Taiwan has made headlines all over the world and has made China very, very unhappy. It's expected that the new President-elect, Lai Ching-te from the pro-sovereignty Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), will be pushing further for Taiwan to remain a self-governing democracy, independent of the rule of China - a stance that has ramifications for the rest of the world, given that Taiwan produce over 90% of the world's advanced microchips. On this episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert is joined by an expert in Southeast Asian politics, Dr Roger Lee Huang from Macquarie University, to explain the situation.

Why does Taiwan's election result matter to the rest of the world?

The recent election in Taiwan has made headlines all over the world and has made China very, very unhappy. It's expected that the new President-elect, Lai Ching-te from the pro-sovereignty Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), will be pushing further for Taiwan to remain a self-governing democracy, independent of the rule of China - a stance that has ramifications for the rest of the world, given that Taiwan produce over 90% of the world's advanced microchips. On this episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert is joined by an expert in Southeast Asian politics, Dr Roger Lee Huang from Macquarie University, to explain the situation.

11:57

EP19 - S5

15 Jan 24

All hail Queen Mary, the first Australian-born Queen Consort

Mary Donaldson was born and raised in Tasmania, and has today become Queen of Denmark. It's a remarkable story of a girl living in a share house in Bondi Junction, who met the love of her life at a bar during the Sydney Olympics, and didn't know he was a prince. In this episode of The Briefing we're joined by Sebastian Olden-Jorgensen, Professor of Modern History specialising in court history, to talk about how a girl from Tasmania became Queen of Denmark. Headlines: 100 days since the start of the war in Gaza Pro-sovereignty party wins in Taiwan election Mass rescue at Sydney beach Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

All hail Queen Mary, the first Australian-born Queen Consort

Mary Donaldson was born and raised in Tasmania, and has today become Queen of Denmark. It's a remarkable story of a girl living in a share house in Bondi Junction, who met the love of her life at a bar during the Sydney Olympics, and didn't know he was a prince. In this episode of The Briefing we're joined by Sebastian Olden-Jorgensen, Professor of Modern History specialising in court history, to talk about how a girl from Tasmania became Queen of Denmark. Headlines: 100 days since the start of the war in Gaza Pro-sovereignty party wins in Taiwan election Mass rescue at Sydney beach Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

20:12

EP18 - S5

14 Jan 24

Nazeem Hussain on keeping mum and performance anxiety

Comedian Nazeem Hussain has done a lot of things – he created a TV show on SBS, made the Grand Finals of I'm a Celebrity Get Me out of Here, and he's recently added childrens book author to his accolades. In this chat with Antoinette Lattouf, Nazeem reveals how he hid his comedy career from his mum and his most terrifying performance experience to date Weekend List:  Off Menu podcast My 21st Century Blues album by Raye Lychee Martini by Glow up Beverages Antoinette's staycation tips  Send us your Weekend List suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

Nazeem Hussain on keeping mum and performance anxiety

Comedian Nazeem Hussain has done a lot of things – he created a TV show on SBS, made the Grand Finals of I'm a Celebrity Get Me out of Here, and he's recently added childrens book author to his accolades. In this chat with Antoinette Lattouf, Nazeem reveals how he hid his comedy career from his mum and his most terrifying performance experience to date Weekend List:  Off Menu podcast My 21st Century Blues album by Raye Lychee Martini by Glow up Beverages Antoinette's staycation tips  Send us your Weekend List suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

32:56

EP17 - S5

12 Jan 24

The genocide case against Israel

The International Court of Justice has held its first public hearing in the genocide case against Israel, over its war in Gaza. Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu denies his country is committing genocide against the Palestinian people. He declared war following the October 7 terrorist attacks – where Hamas killed around 1,200 Israeli citizens and kidnapped a further 240. Bension Siebert is joined by international law expert, Juliette McIntyre, to discuss the first day of public hearings in the landmark case – and what impact it could have on the war, and the world. Headlines: Australia Day merchandise sparks war of words State of Emergency declared in Papua New Guinea Australia urged to start naming heatwaves Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

The genocide case against Israel

The International Court of Justice has held its first public hearing in the genocide case against Israel, over its war in Gaza. Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu denies his country is committing genocide against the Palestinian people. He declared war following the October 7 terrorist attacks – where Hamas killed around 1,200 Israeli citizens and kidnapped a further 240. Bension Siebert is joined by international law expert, Juliette McIntyre, to discuss the first day of public hearings in the landmark case – and what impact it could have on the war, and the world. Headlines: Australia Day merchandise sparks war of words State of Emergency declared in Papua New Guinea Australia urged to start naming heatwaves Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

22:06

EP15 - S5

11 Jan 24

How to buy a house in 2024

It’s the Great Australian Dream: buying a property of your own. But in a real estate market blighted by rising prices and high interest rates, getting onto the property ladder in the first place can seem impossible. But is there hope yet? This week, The Briefing team brings you a five-part series on how to sort out your financial life in the new year.  In this episode, Bension Siebert is bringing you advice from property guru Dr Andrew Wilson on what you need to do to buy a home in 2024. 

How to buy a house in 2024

It’s the Great Australian Dream: buying a property of your own. But in a real estate market blighted by rising prices and high interest rates, getting onto the property ladder in the first place can seem impossible. But is there hope yet? This week, The Briefing team brings you a five-part series on how to sort out your financial life in the new year.  In this episode, Bension Siebert is bringing you advice from property guru Dr Andrew Wilson on what you need to do to buy a home in 2024. 

11:44

EP14 - S5

11 Jan 24

Why crazy rent hikes are about to end

Australia's housing crisis is marching on: house prices across the country went up by 8.1% last year, while rents have gone up by a whopping 8.3%. But there could be light on the horizon, with rents forecast to ease in 2024. In this episode of The Briefing, Sacha Barbour Gatt speaks with Core Logic's Eliza Owen about what factors could bring our weekly rent down. HEADLINES: Woolies drops Australia Day gear Serious unrest in Papua New Guinea Nominations for the Screen Actors Guild Awards Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Why crazy rent hikes are about to end

Australia's housing crisis is marching on: house prices across the country went up by 8.1% last year, while rents have gone up by a whopping 8.3%. But there could be light on the horizon, with rents forecast to ease in 2024. In this episode of The Briefing, Sacha Barbour Gatt speaks with Core Logic's Eliza Owen about what factors could bring our weekly rent down. HEADLINES: Woolies drops Australia Day gear Serious unrest in Papua New Guinea Nominations for the Screen Actors Guild Awards Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

19:53

EP13 - S5

10 Jan 24

From prison to praise: Who is Gypsy Rose Blanchard?

After nearly nine years Gypsy Rose Blanchard has been released from prison. The now 32-year-old was convicted for her role in the murder of her mother Clauddine "Dee Dee" Blanchard. But she's being praised as a hero after surviving abuse at the hands of her mum who had a little-known syndrome called Munchausen by Proxy. Since her release Gypsy has been going viral and in this chat, Bension Siebert is joined by Sacha Barbour Gatt to break down the life of Gypsy and her sudden rise to fame. Lifeline 13 11 14 HEADLINES: Head of government probe into supermarkets named New surge in Covid infections Iconic promises refunds for hacked accounts France names its first openly gay PM Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

From prison to praise: Who is Gypsy Rose Blanchard?

After nearly nine years Gypsy Rose Blanchard has been released from prison. The now 32-year-old was convicted for her role in the murder of her mother Clauddine "Dee Dee" Blanchard. But she's being praised as a hero after surviving abuse at the hands of her mum who had a little-known syndrome called Munchausen by Proxy. Since her release Gypsy has been going viral and in this chat, Bension Siebert is joined by Sacha Barbour Gatt to break down the life of Gypsy and her sudden rise to fame. Lifeline 13 11 14 HEADLINES: Head of government probe into supermarkets named New surge in Covid infections Iconic promises refunds for hacked accounts France names its first openly gay PM Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

20:28

EP11 - S5

9 Jan 24

How to get a promotion in 2024

Is 2024 the year you take your next step forward in your career? Getting a promotion makes many a New Year's resolutions list - but if you're hoping for one this year, what should you be doing to best set yourself up for one? And is getting a promotion all it's cracked up to be? This week, The Briefing team brings you a five-part series on how to sort out your financial life in the new year.  In this episode, Bension Siebert is joined by Sue Williamson, Associate Professor of Human Resource Management at UNSW Canberra, to guide us through the do's and dont's to getting a promotion. 

How to get a promotion in 2024

Is 2024 the year you take your next step forward in your career? Getting a promotion makes many a New Year's resolutions list - but if you're hoping for one this year, what should you be doing to best set yourself up for one? And is getting a promotion all it's cracked up to be? This week, The Briefing team brings you a five-part series on how to sort out your financial life in the new year.  In this episode, Bension Siebert is joined by Sue Williamson, Associate Professor of Human Resource Management at UNSW Canberra, to guide us through the do's and dont's to getting a promotion. 

10:52

EP10 - S5

9 Jan 24

Inside the program deradicalising Andrew Tate's teen fans

A year ago the Raising Awareness and Prevention (RAP) project in the UK was inundated with phone calls from boys' schools. The reason: Andrew Tate. The schools were concerned about the number of teenagers who were idolising the right wing influencer, who came to be known for his toxic takes on masculinity and women. One year on we speak with Deana Puccio, co-founder of the RAP Project to find out if any progress has been made, and what's been learned. HEADLINES: Flash flooding in parts of regional Victoria Cop lashes Summernats hoons US set to return to the moon Golden Globes wrap and goody bags Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Inside the program deradicalising Andrew Tate's teen fans

A year ago the Raising Awareness and Prevention (RAP) project in the UK was inundated with phone calls from boys' schools. The reason: Andrew Tate. The schools were concerned about the number of teenagers who were idolising the right wing influencer, who came to be known for his toxic takes on masculinity and women. One year on we speak with Deana Puccio, co-founder of the RAP Project to find out if any progress has been made, and what's been learned. HEADLINES: Flash flooding in parts of regional Victoria Cop lashes Summernats hoons US set to return to the moon Golden Globes wrap and goody bags Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

20:07

EP09 - S5

8 Jan 24

How to financially re-set in 2024

It's a new year, you're a new you, let's get your finances sorted! Our bank accounts often take a major hit during the holiday season - so how do you quickly recover, and what should you be aiming for in 2024?  This week, The Briefing team brings you a five-part series on how to sort out your financial life in the new year.  In today's episodes, Bension Siebert is joined by Canstar Editor-at-Large and author of The Great $20 Adventure, Effie Zahos, to talk through the simple ways you can start to get your money in order.

How to financially re-set in 2024

It's a new year, you're a new you, let's get your finances sorted! Our bank accounts often take a major hit during the holiday season - so how do you quickly recover, and what should you be aiming for in 2024?  This week, The Briefing team brings you a five-part series on how to sort out your financial life in the new year.  In today's episodes, Bension Siebert is joined by Canstar Editor-at-Large and author of The Great $20 Adventure, Effie Zahos, to talk through the simple ways you can start to get your money in order.

11:28

EP08 - S5

8 Jan 24

How your work spaces could change in 2024

The 4-day work week, flexible working and co-working are all going to be major buzzwords this year. There's also coworking, where we're seeing moves towards creating spaces in suburban centres so that workers don't need to commute as far. In this episode Rhianna Patrick delves into all of this with Jared Lindzon, a freelance journalist who has been published in the BBC, Time Magazine and Fast Company. HEADLINES: Man to face court over Melbourne stabbings Eight rave goers in critical condition due to suspected More details on Alaska Airlines flight that lost a chunk of fuselage Rafael Nadal out of Australian Open Golden Globes to air today Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

How your work spaces could change in 2024

The 4-day work week, flexible working and co-working are all going to be major buzzwords this year. There's also coworking, where we're seeing moves towards creating spaces in suburban centres so that workers don't need to commute as far. In this episode Rhianna Patrick delves into all of this with Jared Lindzon, a freelance journalist who has been published in the BBC, Time Magazine and Fast Company. HEADLINES: Man to face court over Melbourne stabbings Eight rave goers in critical condition due to suspected More details on Alaska Airlines flight that lost a chunk of fuselage Rafael Nadal out of Australian Open Golden Globes to air today Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

22:01

EP07 - S5

7 Jan 24

Summer Weekends: Elise Loehnen went from GOOP to reclaiming her name

Welcome to our summer series of the Weekend Briefing featuring some of your favourite interviews from 2023! Elise has achieved a lot! She has ghost written 12 books, was second-in-command at Goop and has now released her first book under her own name - On Our Best Behaviour: The Price Women Pay to Be Good. In this chat with Jamila Rizvi, Elise explains where the seven deadly sins originated from (and nope they’re not from the bible) and the pressure women place on themselves to be good. Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Summer Weekends: Elise Loehnen went from GOOP to reclaiming her name

Welcome to our summer series of the Weekend Briefing featuring some of your favourite interviews from 2023! Elise has achieved a lot! She has ghost written 12 books, was second-in-command at Goop and has now released her first book under her own name - On Our Best Behaviour: The Price Women Pay to Be Good. In this chat with Jamila Rizvi, Elise explains where the seven deadly sins originated from (and nope they’re not from the bible) and the pressure women place on themselves to be good. Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

33:47

EP06 - S5

5 Jan 24

Aussie rescue hero on Japan's gold standard earthquake plan

Dozens of people have died, hundreds have been injured– and tens of thousands of homes destroyed after Japan’s massive 7.6 magnitude earthquake earlier this week. But as Japan is one of the most earthquake-prone countries in the world, it’s also best prepared to deal with a major disaster like this. In this episode of the Briefing Rhianna Patrick is joined by disaster expert Arnold Dix to find out what makes the way Japan deals with earthquakes different to the rest of the world. Headlines: Time is running out to recover people crushed in Japan earthquake More details emerge over miracle Japan airlines evacuation Jeffrey Epstein associates named Record set for the biggest Sydney funnel web spider Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Aussie rescue hero on Japan's gold standard earthquake plan

Dozens of people have died, hundreds have been injured– and tens of thousands of homes destroyed after Japan’s massive 7.6 magnitude earthquake earlier this week. But as Japan is one of the most earthquake-prone countries in the world, it’s also best prepared to deal with a major disaster like this. In this episode of the Briefing Rhianna Patrick is joined by disaster expert Arnold Dix to find out what makes the way Japan deals with earthquakes different to the rest of the world. Headlines: Time is running out to recover people crushed in Japan earthquake More details emerge over miracle Japan airlines evacuation Jeffrey Epstein associates named Record set for the biggest Sydney funnel web spider Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

19:10

EP05 - S5

4 Jan 24

Why we can now take the Mickey out of Disney

For the first time, one of Disney’s marquee characters — Mickey himself — has entered the public domain 95 years after his creation. But it will only be the earliest version of the iconic character though, the one from “Steamboat Willie”. Disney has historically pushed very hard for an extension of copyright protections. In fact, the copyright extension act of 1998 was nicknamed the Mickey Mouse Protection Act. In this episode of The Briefing Rhianna Patrick finds out just what the implications of this are with artistic property law professor Jane Ginsburg. Headlines: 100 people dead in Iran after two explosions Hamas’ deputy leader killed in Lebanon Albanese launches Iraq War document probe De Minaur takes down Djokovic Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Why we can now take the Mickey out of Disney

For the first time, one of Disney’s marquee characters — Mickey himself — has entered the public domain 95 years after his creation. But it will only be the earliest version of the iconic character though, the one from “Steamboat Willie”. Disney has historically pushed very hard for an extension of copyright protections. In fact, the copyright extension act of 1998 was nicknamed the Mickey Mouse Protection Act. In this episode of The Briefing Rhianna Patrick finds out just what the implications of this are with artistic property law professor Jane Ginsburg. Headlines: 100 people dead in Iran after two explosions Hamas’ deputy leader killed in Lebanon Albanese launches Iraq War document probe De Minaur takes down Djokovic Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

18:13

EP04 - S5

3 Jan 24

Boomer breakups: why are our parents getting divorced more than us?

Did you know every generation is seeing a decline in divorce stats, except for boomers? It turns out Hugh Jackman’s split from his wife Deborah Lee Furness of 27 years wasn’t just a flash in the pan and is part of a wider trend. In this episode of The Briefing Katrina Blowers finds out the why behind boomer break-ups with Elisabeth Shaw from Relationships Australia. Headlines: Five dead after Japan aircraft crash 5 dead in Ukraine airstrike ADF deployed to help with Queensland floods Interim Sea World helicopter crash report out A crocodile has leapt into a fisherman’s boat in Queensland Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Boomer breakups: why are our parents getting divorced more than us?

Did you know every generation is seeing a decline in divorce stats, except for boomers? It turns out Hugh Jackman’s split from his wife Deborah Lee Furness of 27 years wasn’t just a flash in the pan and is part of a wider trend. In this episode of The Briefing Katrina Blowers finds out the why behind boomer break-ups with Elisabeth Shaw from Relationships Australia. Headlines: Five dead after Japan aircraft crash 5 dead in Ukraine airstrike ADF deployed to help with Queensland floods Interim Sea World helicopter crash report out A crocodile has leapt into a fisherman’s boat in Queensland Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

21:23

EP03 - S5

2 Jan 24

The truth behind ‘manifesting’ and why it might not be right for you

Did you know google searches for 'manifesting' soared by 669% from late March to mid-July last year? In this episode of The Briefing Katrina Blowers is joined by cognitive neuroscientist Rhiannon Jones to find out if ‘manifesting’ actually helps make our dreams come true, if it’s just another word for goal-setting or if it could actually have a negative impact on our lives. Headlines: Thousands evacuated after Japan earthquake Hundreds of people have been evacuated from Queensland Denmark in shock after Queen Margrethe's announcement Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

The truth behind ‘manifesting’ and why it might not be right for you

Did you know google searches for 'manifesting' soared by 669% from late March to mid-July last year? In this episode of The Briefing Katrina Blowers is joined by cognitive neuroscientist Rhiannon Jones to find out if ‘manifesting’ actually helps make our dreams come true, if it’s just another word for goal-setting or if it could actually have a negative impact on our lives. Headlines: Thousands evacuated after Japan earthquake Hundreds of people have been evacuated from Queensland Denmark in shock after Queen Margrethe's announcement Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

18:39

EP02 - S5

1 Jan 24

A futurist explains what the big trends will be for 2024

It’s the first day of 2024, and some big trends are on the cards for this year. Democracies will be tested; AI will lead to major changes in our work and health; and we might finally move beyond the smartphone. In this episode of The Briefing we unpack what to expect in 2024 with futurist Ross Dawson.   Headlines supplied by the Listnr newsroom. Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

A futurist explains what the big trends will be for 2024

It’s the first day of 2024, and some big trends are on the cards for this year. Democracies will be tested; AI will lead to major changes in our work and health; and we might finally move beyond the smartphone. In this episode of The Briefing we unpack what to expect in 2024 with futurist Ross Dawson.   Headlines supplied by the Listnr newsroom. Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

14:17

EP01 - S5

31 Dec 23


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