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Episodes


Can Tanya Plibersek stop new fossil fuel projects?

Australia has a new, stronger emissions reduction target. But we are also one of the world’s biggest exporters of fossil fuels, and there’s no plan from the government to reduce that. That’s because Australian coal and gas exports that are burned overseas aren't counted in our emissions. But could that change? And will Environment minister Tanya Plibersek begin to consider those emissions and the damage they cause to our climate when new projects are approved? Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper Tom Morton on whether Australia is ready to take responsibility for the coal and gas we sell. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Contributor The Saturday Paper, Tom Morton.

Can Tanya Plibersek stop new fossil fuel projects?

Australia has a new, stronger emissions reduction target. But we are also one of the world’s biggest exporters of fossil fuels, and there’s no plan from the government to reduce that. That’s because Australian coal and gas exports that are burned overseas aren't counted in our emissions. But could that change? And will Environment minister Tanya Plibersek begin to consider those emissions and the damage they cause to our climate when new projects are approved? Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper Tom Morton on whether Australia is ready to take responsibility for the coal and gas we sell. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Contributor The Saturday Paper, Tom Morton.

18:32

6 Dec 22

This generation is an existential threat to the Liberal Party

The Liberal Party is trying to resurrect its popularity after a devastating loss this year, under the leadership of Scott Morrison. But can changing the personalities at the top of the party make a difference? Or is there something deeper behind the decline in its fortunes?  A study published yesterday indicates that only one in four voters under the age of 40 voted for the Coalition – and that seems unlikely to change. Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe, on how this generation of younger voters is changing the assumptions we’ve had about the electorate and why all the major parties need to adapt. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe

This generation is an existential threat to the Liberal Party

The Liberal Party is trying to resurrect its popularity after a devastating loss this year, under the leadership of Scott Morrison. But can changing the personalities at the top of the party make a difference? Or is there something deeper behind the decline in its fortunes?  A study published yesterday indicates that only one in four voters under the age of 40 voted for the Coalition – and that seems unlikely to change. Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe, on how this generation of younger voters is changing the assumptions we’ve had about the electorate and why all the major parties need to adapt. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe

19:44

5 Dec 22

‘We exist 365 days a year’

In 1992, the UN General Assembly agreed that 3 December every year would be International Day of People with Disability. It marked an early attempt to treat disability as a human rights and access issue – something that was becoming a movement across the world at the time. Here in Australia, It was the same year that Australia passed the Disability Discrimination Act. But thirty years later, how much progress has been made? And has society really stopped viewing disability through the lenses of medicine or charity? Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper, writer and critic Olivia Muscat on what the day means to her, and how it could be done better. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper writer and critic Olivia Muscat.

‘We exist 365 days a year’

In 1992, the UN General Assembly agreed that 3 December every year would be International Day of People with Disability. It marked an early attempt to treat disability as a human rights and access issue – something that was becoming a movement across the world at the time. Here in Australia, It was the same year that Australia passed the Disability Discrimination Act. But thirty years later, how much progress has been made? And has society really stopped viewing disability through the lenses of medicine or charity? Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper, writer and critic Olivia Muscat on what the day means to her, and how it could be done better. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper writer and critic Olivia Muscat.

18:20

4 Dec 22

Scott Morrison makes history (for all the wrong reasons)

A prime minister will never again be able to secretly appoint themselves to act in multiple ministries. The practice will be made unlawful, with new rules to make appointments public – even Scott Morrison agrees with that. He said as much, when he rose in front of the parliament to explain his actions. But the speech he delivered was hardly an admission of guilt. Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on what Scott Morrison did when faced with the chance to explain himself. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

Scott Morrison makes history (for all the wrong reasons)

A prime minister will never again be able to secretly appoint themselves to act in multiple ministries. The practice will be made unlawful, with new rules to make appointments public – even Scott Morrison agrees with that. He said as much, when he rose in front of the parliament to explain his actions. But the speech he delivered was hardly an admission of guilt. Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on what Scott Morrison did when faced with the chance to explain himself. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

20:35

1 Dec 22

When bureaucrats try to understand human behaviour

There are people inside government departments who want to use insights into human behaviour to influence us. At its best, it can help design systems to get the best outcomes for people. But at its worst, it can ‘nudge’ people into accepting bad outcomes; from not appealing decisions to not getting the services they’re entitled to. Today, senior reporter at The Saturday Paper Rick Morton, on the job ad for someone to look into human behaviour and its strange links to the origins of the Robo-debt disaster. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior reporter at The Saturday Paper Rick Morton

When bureaucrats try to understand human behaviour

There are people inside government departments who want to use insights into human behaviour to influence us. At its best, it can help design systems to get the best outcomes for people. But at its worst, it can ‘nudge’ people into accepting bad outcomes; from not appealing decisions to not getting the services they’re entitled to. Today, senior reporter at The Saturday Paper Rick Morton, on the job ad for someone to look into human behaviour and its strange links to the origins of the Robo-debt disaster. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior reporter at The Saturday Paper Rick Morton

19:51

30 Nov 22

The biggest protests in China since Tiananmen

This week, streets across China filled with angry protestors. Some held blank pieces of paper instead of signs, to protest censorship, others chanted ‘Down with Xi Jinping’. They’re the most significant protests China has seen for 30 years, according to analysts. But how have they happened under the surveillance regime of the state?  And what do they mean for the future of the Chinese Communist Party and for Xi Jinping and the China he’s trying to shape? Today, Senior Lecturer in Journalism at the University of Melbourne, Louisa Lim on the protests igniting across China, despite the shadow of Tiananmen.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Journalist Louisa Lim.

The biggest protests in China since Tiananmen

This week, streets across China filled with angry protestors. Some held blank pieces of paper instead of signs, to protest censorship, others chanted ‘Down with Xi Jinping’. They’re the most significant protests China has seen for 30 years, according to analysts. But how have they happened under the surveillance regime of the state?  And what do they mean for the future of the Chinese Communist Party and for Xi Jinping and the China he’s trying to shape? Today, Senior Lecturer in Journalism at the University of Melbourne, Louisa Lim on the protests igniting across China, despite the shadow of Tiananmen.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Journalist Louisa Lim.

21:01

29 Nov 22

How much Christianity do we need in our military?

If you don’t believe in God, then heaven help you in the ADF. Those are the words of Senator David Shoebridge, who has argued that our military is putting too much faith in religious chaplains to provide support for service members. The military employs 158 full-time chaplains, 150 of whom are ordained Christian ministers. But as the military becomes more diverse and more secular, who are these chaplains serving? Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper Amy Fallon on the role of religion in the ADF and what happens when it’s challenged.   Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper, Amy Fallon.

How much Christianity do we need in our military?

If you don’t believe in God, then heaven help you in the ADF. Those are the words of Senator David Shoebridge, who has argued that our military is putting too much faith in religious chaplains to provide support for service members. The military employs 158 full-time chaplains, 150 of whom are ordained Christian ministers. But as the military becomes more diverse and more secular, who are these chaplains serving? Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper Amy Fallon on the role of religion in the ADF and what happens when it’s challenged.   Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper, Amy Fallon.

18:33

28 Nov 22

David Pocock’s vote: The most valuable thing in Canberra

The wages and workplaces of Australians could be about to change. The government’s new industrial relations packages promises to make pay more transparent and strengthen the hand of workers in negotiations. But whether this passes, comes down to the decision of one man: David Pocock. His vote has become the most valuable commodity in Canberra. Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe, takes us inside how David Pocock made his decision to back Industrial Relations reform. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe

David Pocock’s vote: The most valuable thing in Canberra

The wages and workplaces of Australians could be about to change. The government’s new industrial relations packages promises to make pay more transparent and strengthen the hand of workers in negotiations. But whether this passes, comes down to the decision of one man: David Pocock. His vote has become the most valuable commodity in Canberra. Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe, takes us inside how David Pocock made his decision to back Industrial Relations reform. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe

19:27

27 Nov 22

A referendum on Dan Andrews: Inside the Victorian election

The first major election since a wave of green and teal changed the federal map is set for this Saturday. The Victorian election is about a lot of things, including being a referendum on Dan Andrews and his premiership. But the election could also tell us more about how the electoral forces in Australia are shifting, and how alternatives to the major parties are rising. Today, election analyst and host of The Tally Room podcast Ben Raue on tomorrow’s election, the fate of Dan Andrews and the redrawing of the electoral map. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Host of The Tally Room podcast, Ben Raue.

A referendum on Dan Andrews: Inside the Victorian election

The first major election since a wave of green and teal changed the federal map is set for this Saturday. The Victorian election is about a lot of things, including being a referendum on Dan Andrews and his premiership. But the election could also tell us more about how the electoral forces in Australia are shifting, and how alternatives to the major parties are rising. Today, election analyst and host of The Tally Room podcast Ben Raue on tomorrow’s election, the fate of Dan Andrews and the redrawing of the electoral map. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Host of The Tally Room podcast, Ben Raue.

20:26

24 Nov 22

Migrant workers died to bring us this World Cup

The World Cup is the most watched sporting event on earth. Some predict that this year’s matches in Qatar could be watched by 5 billion during the month-long tournament. But the grand spectacle of the World Cup is stained with allegations that migrant workers have died to make it happen. So what does it take for the world to look away? And what happens when sport and politics can’t be separated? Today, journalist Kieran Pender on how the world game found itself defending human rights abuses. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Journalist, Kieran Pender

Migrant workers died to bring us this World Cup

The World Cup is the most watched sporting event on earth. Some predict that this year’s matches in Qatar could be watched by 5 billion during the month-long tournament. But the grand spectacle of the World Cup is stained with allegations that migrant workers have died to make it happen. So what does it take for the world to look away? And what happens when sport and politics can’t be separated? Today, journalist Kieran Pender on how the world game found itself defending human rights abuses. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Journalist, Kieran Pender

22:16

23 Nov 22

Did Australia live up to expectations at COP27?

The world has come to new agreements on climate action. At COP27 in Egypt, measures to tackle damage and loss in countries affected by climate change have been decided upon. But there was also disappointment, largely around the failure to make more ambitious commitments to reduce emissions. The summit also marked a turning point for Australia — a chance for a new government to bring its new targets to the international stage.  Today, fellow of the Asia Society Policy Institute and former diplomatic adviser during the Paris Agreement negotiations Thom Woodroofe on Australia’s role at COP27, and the next challenge: meeting our commitments. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Fellow of the Asia Society Policy Institute and former diplomatic adviser during the Paris Agreement negotiations, Thom Woodroofe. Background reading: What it’s like to negotiate a climate agreement.

Did Australia live up to expectations at COP27?

The world has come to new agreements on climate action. At COP27 in Egypt, measures to tackle damage and loss in countries affected by climate change have been decided upon. But there was also disappointment, largely around the failure to make more ambitious commitments to reduce emissions. The summit also marked a turning point for Australia — a chance for a new government to bring its new targets to the international stage.  Today, fellow of the Asia Society Policy Institute and former diplomatic adviser during the Paris Agreement negotiations Thom Woodroofe on Australia’s role at COP27, and the next challenge: meeting our commitments. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Fellow of the Asia Society Policy Institute and former diplomatic adviser during the Paris Agreement negotiations, Thom Woodroofe. Background reading: What it’s like to negotiate a climate agreement.

18:26

22 Nov 22

How Mike Cannon-Brookes staged a climate coup

Last week, Mike Cannon-Brookes succeeded in staging what amounts to an internal coup at Australia’s largest climate polluter, AGL. Having failed in his attempt to take over the company, the tech billionaire used its annual general meeting to get four new directors onto its board.  Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe on what’s next for Cannon-Brookes and the dirty company he wants to clean up. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: National correspondent at The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe. Background reading: Inside Mike Cannon-Brookes’s AGL coup.

How Mike Cannon-Brookes staged a climate coup

Last week, Mike Cannon-Brookes succeeded in staging what amounts to an internal coup at Australia’s largest climate polluter, AGL. Having failed in his attempt to take over the company, the tech billionaire used its annual general meeting to get four new directors onto its board.  Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe on what’s next for Cannon-Brookes and the dirty company he wants to clean up. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: National correspondent at The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe. Background reading: Inside Mike Cannon-Brookes’s AGL coup.

19:58

21 Nov 22

‘Use of force’: How Medibank changed the fight on hackers

Some of the most sensitive data to be obtained by hackers in Australian history has been published. A Russian network of hackers has put online private medical data including names, records of pregnancy terminations, HIV status, and treatment for drug and alcohol problems. The data was obtained in an attack on Medibank, and the vulnerability of the health insurer has now convinced the Australian government to unleash new capabilities against hackers around the world. Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton on the powers our intelligence agencies have been building up for years and how they plan on using them. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton.

‘Use of force’: How Medibank changed the fight on hackers

Some of the most sensitive data to be obtained by hackers in Australian history has been published. A Russian network of hackers has put online private medical data including names, records of pregnancy terminations, HIV status, and treatment for drug and alcohol problems. The data was obtained in an attack on Medibank, and the vulnerability of the health insurer has now convinced the Australian government to unleash new capabilities against hackers around the world. Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton on the powers our intelligence agencies have been building up for years and how they plan on using them. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton.

20:25

20 Nov 22

Albanese’s meeting with Xi Jinping: Will Australia get a second date?

Australia was one of the first western nations to recognise the communist government of China, almost 50 years ago. But more recently, China appeared to freeze out Australia diplomatically, and for six long years Chinese President Xi Jinping did not meet an Australian prime minister. This week, that changed. But how did the meeting come about? What was said? And can we restore diplomacy while continuing to speak vocally when criticism of the Chinese government is needed? Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on how Anthony Albanese sat down with Xi Jinping in Bali. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

Albanese’s meeting with Xi Jinping: Will Australia get a second date?

Australia was one of the first western nations to recognise the communist government of China, almost 50 years ago. But more recently, China appeared to freeze out Australia diplomatically, and for six long years Chinese President Xi Jinping did not meet an Australian prime minister. This week, that changed. But how did the meeting come about? What was said? And can we restore diplomacy while continuing to speak vocally when criticism of the Chinese government is needed? Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on how Anthony Albanese sat down with Xi Jinping in Bali. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

20:50

17 Nov 22

Charlie Teo: The media’s ‘maverick, miracle doctor’

Dr Charlie Teo is known for his incredible brain surgeries, taking on operations that other doctors won’t touch. But several families have come forward, who allege they were misled about the risks and that Teo’s operations left their loved ones worse off than before. Teo denies any wrongdoing, and says he treats his patients like he would want to be treated.  But there’s another player in this story that hasn’t been subject to scrutiny: the news media. Today, contributor to The Monthly, Martin McKenzie-Murray, on Dr Charlie Teo and how the media built the image of a maverick miracle worker. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Contributor to The Monthly Martin McKenzie-Murray.

Charlie Teo: The media’s ‘maverick, miracle doctor’

Dr Charlie Teo is known for his incredible brain surgeries, taking on operations that other doctors won’t touch. But several families have come forward, who allege they were misled about the risks and that Teo’s operations left their loved ones worse off than before. Teo denies any wrongdoing, and says he treats his patients like he would want to be treated.  But there’s another player in this story that hasn’t been subject to scrutiny: the news media. Today, contributor to The Monthly, Martin McKenzie-Murray, on Dr Charlie Teo and how the media built the image of a maverick miracle worker. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Contributor to The Monthly Martin McKenzie-Murray.

23:00

16 Nov 22

How not to fund your future leaders, Scott Morrison-style

It was the governor-general’s pet project, a foundation that promised to nurture the future leaders of Australia. But the elite foundation never came to be – the new government has axed it. So why did the governor-general put his name to it? Why did Scott Morrison decide to fund it before it was viable? And who was advocating for it? Today, Chief Political Correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton on the Australian Future Leaders Foundation and who was courted to support it. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton.

How not to fund your future leaders, Scott Morrison-style

It was the governor-general’s pet project, a foundation that promised to nurture the future leaders of Australia. But the elite foundation never came to be – the new government has axed it. So why did the governor-general put his name to it? Why did Scott Morrison decide to fund it before it was viable? And who was advocating for it? Today, Chief Political Correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton on the Australian Future Leaders Foundation and who was courted to support it. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton.

20:43

15 Nov 22

Climate justice: Should countries like Australia pay compensation?

As the world gathers at COP27 to decide on the next steps in our response to the climate crisis, the biggest point of contention is one idea: climate justice. It’s an idea that could force the richest nations – such as Australia – to pay for the damages and loss that climate catastrophe is causing in poorer countries. But could it really happen? Is it viable? And would Australia ever sign up to the idea of climate reparations? Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe on how the countries facing devastation from our emissions are demanding justice. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe.

Climate justice: Should countries like Australia pay compensation?

As the world gathers at COP27 to decide on the next steps in our response to the climate crisis, the biggest point of contention is one idea: climate justice. It’s an idea that could force the richest nations – such as Australia – to pay for the damages and loss that climate catastrophe is causing in poorer countries. But could it really happen? Is it viable? And would Australia ever sign up to the idea of climate reparations? Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe on how the countries facing devastation from our emissions are demanding justice. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe.

25:46

14 Nov 22

Why nuclear submarines can’t save us

Australia is spending hundreds of billions of dollars on eight nuclear-powered submarines. It’s estimated to be one of the biggest spends in the history of the Australian government. So why are we buying them? Are they the best use of taxpayer money? And will they even be able to do the job they’re meant to do? Today, former director of war studies at the Australian Army Research Centre and adjunct professor at UNSW Canberra Albert Palazzo, on whether new submarines can actually keep us safe. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Former director of war studies at the Australian Army Research Centre, Albert Palazzo.

Why nuclear submarines can’t save us

Australia is spending hundreds of billions of dollars on eight nuclear-powered submarines. It’s estimated to be one of the biggest spends in the history of the Australian government. So why are we buying them? Are they the best use of taxpayer money? And will they even be able to do the job they’re meant to do? Today, former director of war studies at the Australian Army Research Centre and adjunct professor at UNSW Canberra Albert Palazzo, on whether new submarines can actually keep us safe. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Former director of war studies at the Australian Army Research Centre, Albert Palazzo.

20:38

13 Nov 22

The Weekend Read: Sam Vincent on the overdue arrival of native Australian ingredients on our plates

Today, author and farmer Sam Vincent, with his piece from the latest edition of The Monthly.  It explores how native Australian ingredients have gone from novelty to gourmet; now featured in some of the most acclaimed fine dining establishments in Australia. But what does the rise of culinary nationalism mean for the way we think about Australian food? Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Author and farmer, Sam Vincent Background Reading: Native foods in the Plate Southern Land

The Weekend Read: Sam Vincent on the overdue arrival of native Australian ingredients on our plates

Today, author and farmer Sam Vincent, with his piece from the latest edition of The Monthly.  It explores how native Australian ingredients have gone from novelty to gourmet; now featured in some of the most acclaimed fine dining establishments in Australia. But what does the rise of culinary nationalism mean for the way we think about Australian food? Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Author and farmer, Sam Vincent Background Reading: Native foods in the Plate Southern Land

52:54

12 Nov 22

‘Air of possibility’: Surely not in Canberra?!

The Labor government’s workplace reform package, which it promises will increase wages, has passed the lower house. But it may struggle to pass the senate. There’s frustration mounting between crossbenchers, unions and government ministers – and that’s threatening to derail the most important reform package this government has put forward. But instead of the dispute paralysing the whole of Canberra, something else is happening… Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Chris Wallace on a new season for politics.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper Chris Wallace.

‘Air of possibility’: Surely not in Canberra?!

The Labor government’s workplace reform package, which it promises will increase wages, has passed the lower house. But it may struggle to pass the senate. There’s frustration mounting between crossbenchers, unions and government ministers – and that’s threatening to derail the most important reform package this government has put forward. But instead of the dispute paralysing the whole of Canberra, something else is happening… Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Chris Wallace on a new season for politics.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper Chris Wallace.

18:41

10 Nov 22

Elon Musk’s half-baked Twitter takeover

Elon Musk says he plans to turn Twitter into his ideal version of a public square, and use it to advance the evolution of human communication. But his vision of that public square also involves people paying to be prominent – and the public are not allowed to parody Musk, unless they clearly state they’re making a joke. So what does the chaotic week at Twitter tell us about the world’s richest man, his ideas about speech and how far he’ll go to influence the way we communicate? Today, author Elle Hardy, on Elon Musk’s attempt to engineer the truth. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Journalist and author of Beyond Belief, Elle Hardy.

Elon Musk’s half-baked Twitter takeover

Elon Musk says he plans to turn Twitter into his ideal version of a public square, and use it to advance the evolution of human communication. But his vision of that public square also involves people paying to be prominent – and the public are not allowed to parody Musk, unless they clearly state they’re making a joke. So what does the chaotic week at Twitter tell us about the world’s richest man, his ideas about speech and how far he’ll go to influence the way we communicate? Today, author Elle Hardy, on Elon Musk’s attempt to engineer the truth. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Journalist and author of Beyond Belief, Elle Hardy.

21:30

9 Nov 22

They were warned, and did it anyway: Inside robo-debt

Not long ago, the Australian government was forced to abandon a scheme it was using to pursue welfare recipients for money. The robo-debt scheme was binned in 2019 after the government finally asked the solicitor-general for legal advice. He told them what many had long suspected: it was probably unlawful. So who else knew about the potential illegality of robo-debt? How early did they know? And why did it go ahead at all? Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton on the robo-debt royal commission and how years of suffering could have been averted. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton.

They were warned, and did it anyway: Inside robo-debt

Not long ago, the Australian government was forced to abandon a scheme it was using to pursue welfare recipients for money. The robo-debt scheme was binned in 2019 after the government finally asked the solicitor-general for legal advice. He told them what many had long suspected: it was probably unlawful. So who else knew about the potential illegality of robo-debt? How early did they know? And why did it go ahead at all? Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton on the robo-debt royal commission and how years of suffering could have been averted. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton.

20:06

8 Nov 22

​​Could Trump win in 2024? What the midterms will tell us

Today, Americans head to the polls in the country’s midterm elections. At stake is control of the US House of Representatives and the Senate. Both are on a knife's edge, and major losses for the Democrats could make the next two years of Joe Biden’s presidency incredibly difficult and bring major reform to a standstill. That is something Donald Trump will be hoping for, as reports circulate that he could announce his presidential campaign for 2024 within days. Today, former Democratic Party adviser and a senior fellow at the US Studies Centre at the University of Sydney, Bruce Wolpe on the US midterms and what they mean for the future of American politics. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Former Democratic Party adviser and a senior fellow at the US Studies Centre at the University of Sydney, Bruce Wolpe. 

​​Could Trump win in 2024? What the midterms will tell us

Today, Americans head to the polls in the country’s midterm elections. At stake is control of the US House of Representatives and the Senate. Both are on a knife's edge, and major losses for the Democrats could make the next two years of Joe Biden’s presidency incredibly difficult and bring major reform to a standstill. That is something Donald Trump will be hoping for, as reports circulate that he could announce his presidential campaign for 2024 within days. Today, former Democratic Party adviser and a senior fellow at the US Studies Centre at the University of Sydney, Bruce Wolpe on the US midterms and what they mean for the future of American politics. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Former Democratic Party adviser and a senior fellow at the US Studies Centre at the University of Sydney, Bruce Wolpe. 

19:59

7 Nov 22

How Peter Dutton was created

Peter Dutton has an uphill battle, even he would admit that. But the Liberal leader known for tough, hardline conservative talking points is trying to appear more like Australia’s next prime minister – by insisting he has a softer side, and striking a contrast with his predecessor Scott Morrison. Beneath Dutton’s attempts to rebrand himself, who is he… and where did his ideas come from?  Today, contributor to The Monthly Malcolm Knox on who Peter Dutton is, and what he’s prepared to do to become prime minister. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Monthly Malcolm Knox.

How Peter Dutton was created

Peter Dutton has an uphill battle, even he would admit that. But the Liberal leader known for tough, hardline conservative talking points is trying to appear more like Australia’s next prime minister – by insisting he has a softer side, and striking a contrast with his predecessor Scott Morrison. Beneath Dutton’s attempts to rebrand himself, who is he… and where did his ideas come from?  Today, contributor to The Monthly Malcolm Knox on who Peter Dutton is, and what he’s prepared to do to become prime minister. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Monthly Malcolm Knox.

21:40

6 Nov 22

Wages and power prices: A wake up call for Albanese

People counted Dutton’s Opposition out, but Labor’s restrained budget might have opened up some attack lines for the Liberals… with some help from the Murdoch media. A distressed global economy and rising electricity prices are leaving Labor open to Liberal accusations that they’ve broken an election promise to lower power prices. And: an update on Labor’s industrial relations reforms. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper, Chris Wallace

Wages and power prices: A wake up call for Albanese

People counted Dutton’s Opposition out, but Labor’s restrained budget might have opened up some attack lines for the Liberals… with some help from the Murdoch media. A distressed global economy and rising electricity prices are leaving Labor open to Liberal accusations that they’ve broken an election promise to lower power prices. And: an update on Labor’s industrial relations reforms. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper, Chris Wallace

22:01

3 Nov 22

‘You’re not imagining it’: Why the weather forecast could be wrong

Internal tensions at the organisation that tells us about the weather — the Bureau of Meteorology — appear to be going from bad to worse. Among the latest revelations, the Bureau’s daily forecasts, which many of us rely on, might be getting less accurate. We’ve also learned that the renaming of the organisation was called a ‘rebrand’ internally, even though management publicly claimed they never attempted such a thing. Today, senior reporter at The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton joins us again, with the latest on the agency formerly known as the BoM.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior reporter at The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton

‘You’re not imagining it’: Why the weather forecast could be wrong

Internal tensions at the organisation that tells us about the weather — the Bureau of Meteorology — appear to be going from bad to worse. Among the latest revelations, the Bureau’s daily forecasts, which many of us rely on, might be getting less accurate. We’ve also learned that the renaming of the organisation was called a ‘rebrand’ internally, even though management publicly claimed they never attempted such a thing. Today, senior reporter at The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton joins us again, with the latest on the agency formerly known as the BoM.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior reporter at The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton

18:26

2 Nov 22

Did the home of the Melbourne Cup make the city’s floods worse?

When an inner suburb of Melbourne was hit by flooding a few weeks ago, attention turned to Flemington Racecourse: home of the Melbourne Cup. The track is a floodplain, and in prior floods it had become submerged in water. But not this time. This year, a new flood wall protected it. But could the wall that saved Flemington Racecourse have doomed nearby houses? Or is that debate obscuring the bigger problems facing our cities as the climate crisis closes in? Today, associate editor of The Saturday Paper Martin McKenzie-Murray on the Maribyrnong flood. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Associate editor of The Saturday Paper Martin McKenzie-Murray

Did the home of the Melbourne Cup make the city’s floods worse?

When an inner suburb of Melbourne was hit by flooding a few weeks ago, attention turned to Flemington Racecourse: home of the Melbourne Cup. The track is a floodplain, and in prior floods it had become submerged in water. But not this time. This year, a new flood wall protected it. But could the wall that saved Flemington Racecourse have doomed nearby houses? Or is that debate obscuring the bigger problems facing our cities as the climate crisis closes in? Today, associate editor of The Saturday Paper Martin McKenzie-Murray on the Maribyrnong flood. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Associate editor of The Saturday Paper Martin McKenzie-Murray

21:32

1 Nov 22

Can a fossil fuel company go net-zero?

Unlike in almost every other country in the world, the Australian government actively helps some of our biggest carbon emitters make claims to consumers that they are “green” or even “carbon neutral”. For consumers looking to sign up for household gas and electricity, it’s hard to know which companies to trust. And more importantly, the system could help prop up fossil-fuel projects that threaten to derail our emissions reduction targets. Today, senior researcher at The Australia Institute’s climate and energy program, Polly Hemming, on how the government gives green credentials to fossil-fuel companies. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior researcher at The Australia Institute’s climate and energy program, Polly Hemming.  

Can a fossil fuel company go net-zero?

Unlike in almost every other country in the world, the Australian government actively helps some of our biggest carbon emitters make claims to consumers that they are “green” or even “carbon neutral”. For consumers looking to sign up for household gas and electricity, it’s hard to know which companies to trust. And more importantly, the system could help prop up fossil-fuel projects that threaten to derail our emissions reduction targets. Today, senior researcher at The Australia Institute’s climate and energy program, Polly Hemming, on how the government gives green credentials to fossil-fuel companies. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior researcher at The Australia Institute’s climate and energy program, Polly Hemming.  

20:09

31 Oct 22

House prices are dropping faster than ever

The prices of Australian houses are dropping faster than ever before – but is this a blip on the way to higher prices, or an actual value crash? And if it is a real crash… could that be a good thing?  Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe, on the rollercoaster of the Australian property market. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe.

House prices are dropping faster than ever

The prices of Australian houses are dropping faster than ever before – but is this a blip on the way to higher prices, or an actual value crash? And if it is a real crash… could that be a good thing?  Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe, on the rollercoaster of the Australian property market. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe.

17:39

30 Oct 22

PM Rishi Sunak: Will this one last more than 45 days?

After 45 days of economic chaos under Liz Truss threatened the welfare of ordinary Britons, the UK now has a new prime minister: Rishi Sunak. Sunak’s family wealth of over a billion dollars makes him an unlikely figure for the task – he is the richest MP in the British parliament. But he has made history as the country’s first British Asian prime minister. Today, world editor of The Saturday Paper Jonathan Pearlman, on the ascent of Rishi Sunak and the challenges ahead of him. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: World editor of The Saturday Paper, Jonathan Pearlman  

PM Rishi Sunak: Will this one last more than 45 days?

After 45 days of economic chaos under Liz Truss threatened the welfare of ordinary Britons, the UK now has a new prime minister: Rishi Sunak. Sunak’s family wealth of over a billion dollars makes him an unlikely figure for the task – he is the richest MP in the British parliament. But he has made history as the country’s first British Asian prime minister. Today, world editor of The Saturday Paper Jonathan Pearlman, on the ascent of Rishi Sunak and the challenges ahead of him. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: World editor of The Saturday Paper, Jonathan Pearlman  

22:19

27 Oct 22

Will mashed potato on a Monet solve the climate crisis?

Some of the world’s most treasured art works have been under attack in the last few weeks. Paintings by Van Gogh, Picasso and Monet have been doused in food by climate activists trying to draw attention to the urgent climate crisis. So is this plea for action working? And why are activists turning to this kind of protest?  Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe, on the divide within the environmentalist movement, and what is driving protesters towards desperate action. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe.    

Will mashed potato on a Monet solve the climate crisis?

Some of the world’s most treasured art works have been under attack in the last few weeks. Paintings by Van Gogh, Picasso and Monet have been doused in food by climate activists trying to draw attention to the urgent climate crisis. So is this plea for action working? And why are activists turning to this kind of protest?  Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe, on the divide within the environmentalist movement, and what is driving protesters towards desperate action. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe.    

20:56

26 Oct 22

What’s inside Labor’s first budget?

A Labor government has handed down a budget for the first time in nine years. It isn’t the budget that many might have imagined in May when the party won the election. It lands just as a global economic storm appears to be gathering momentum. Last night, we got the pitch that tells us how this Labor government thinks it can contend with the challenge and what it plans to deliver for Australians. So what’s in it? Who’s getting money? Who is missing out? And how does it set up this term for Prime Minister Anthony Albanese. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton

What’s inside Labor’s first budget?

A Labor government has handed down a budget for the first time in nine years. It isn’t the budget that many might have imagined in May when the party won the election. It lands just as a global economic storm appears to be gathering momentum. Last night, we got the pitch that tells us how this Labor government thinks it can contend with the challenge and what it plans to deliver for Australians. So what’s in it? Who’s getting money? Who is missing out? And how does it set up this term for Prime Minister Anthony Albanese. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton

20:22

25 Oct 22

The Bureau of Meteorology: Chaos at the forecaster

Last Tuesday, while torrential rains brought floods that cut off whole towns in Victoria, Australia’s weather forecasting agency made a strange announcement. The Bureau of Meteorology called on all media to change the name they had used to refer to it: the BoM. Instead it wanted to be called The Bureau. What seemed like an odd branding announcement at first, has led to a series of revelations about working conditions for Australia’s official weather forecasters. Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton on the culture at the Bureau of Meteorology and how science got sidelined. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton

The Bureau of Meteorology: Chaos at the forecaster

Last Tuesday, while torrential rains brought floods that cut off whole towns in Victoria, Australia’s weather forecasting agency made a strange announcement. The Bureau of Meteorology called on all media to change the name they had used to refer to it: the BoM. Instead it wanted to be called The Bureau. What seemed like an odd branding announcement at first, has led to a series of revelations about working conditions for Australia’s official weather forecasters. Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton on the culture at the Bureau of Meteorology and how science got sidelined. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton

21:20

24 Oct 22

Australia is getting a wellbeing budget. What is that?

An idea that Australia discarded a decade ago will return on Tuesday night. That idea is a so-called “wellbeing budget”. It is being talked up by the Treasurer Jim Chalmers.  Chalmers has promised that Australia will follow countries like Scotland and New Zealand in judging the success of government spending not just against GDP and income per person, but based on whether it improves the wellbeing of the Australian people. Today, social researcher and director of research at 89 Degrees East, Rebecca Huntley on whether a budget can actually make us happier. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Social researcher and director of research at 89 Degrees East, Rebecca Huntley.

Australia is getting a wellbeing budget. What is that?

An idea that Australia discarded a decade ago will return on Tuesday night. That idea is a so-called “wellbeing budget”. It is being talked up by the Treasurer Jim Chalmers.  Chalmers has promised that Australia will follow countries like Scotland and New Zealand in judging the success of government spending not just against GDP and income per person, but based on whether it improves the wellbeing of the Australian people. Today, social researcher and director of research at 89 Degrees East, Rebecca Huntley on whether a budget can actually make us happier. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Social researcher and director of research at 89 Degrees East, Rebecca Huntley.

19:33

23 Oct 22

Listen to this before budget night

The Labor party has been making promises. The latest is that it hopes to end domestic and family violence within a generation. But ahead of the budget, the leadership of the party are in a tricky position by promising no tax hikes, no excessive borrowing, but fixing funding to services. Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on the storm clouds gathering as we go into budget week. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.  

Listen to this before budget night

The Labor party has been making promises. The latest is that it hopes to end domestic and family violence within a generation. But ahead of the budget, the leadership of the party are in a tricky position by promising no tax hikes, no excessive borrowing, but fixing funding to services. Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on the storm clouds gathering as we go into budget week. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.  

20:59

20 Oct 22

When your identity is no longer your own

It's been two weeks since millions of Australians learned their data might have been compromised in the Optus hack.  Since then other data breaches have been revealed, and the precarious nature of the way our personal information is often stored is becoming clear.  So what actually happens when someone tries to steal your identity?  Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper, Emma Phillips, on how it feels to lose control of your identity, and her fight to get it back.  In a statement in response to issues raised in this episode, the Victorian Department of Transport said: “We’re protecting Victorian licence holders from identity theft with strong security measures in place to protect the data we hold.” “This includes ensuring that only genuine victims of identity theft can change their licence number and taking steps to ensure a person who calls up, or goes into one of our customer service centres is who they say they are.” Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper, Emma Phillips.  

When your identity is no longer your own

It's been two weeks since millions of Australians learned their data might have been compromised in the Optus hack.  Since then other data breaches have been revealed, and the precarious nature of the way our personal information is often stored is becoming clear.  So what actually happens when someone tries to steal your identity?  Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper, Emma Phillips, on how it feels to lose control of your identity, and her fight to get it back.  In a statement in response to issues raised in this episode, the Victorian Department of Transport said: “We’re protecting Victorian licence holders from identity theft with strong security measures in place to protect the data we hold.” “This includes ensuring that only genuine victims of identity theft can change their licence number and taking steps to ensure a person who calls up, or goes into one of our customer service centres is who they say they are.” Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper, Emma Phillips.  

17:20

19 Oct 22

Sea Shepherd loses its pirate captain

What happens when an organisation founded on radical activism decides to work with, instead of against, authorities?  For Captain Paul Watson that conundrum has led to an acrimonious split from the organisation that he started, Sea Shepherd. Watson has been hailed by some as a hero for his exploits against whaling ships on the high seas — but others say he’s an ‘eco-terrorist’ who has given environmentalism a bad name. Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe on whether this is the end for Paul Watson’s brand of high-stakes environmentalism. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter, Instagram and TikTok Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe.

Sea Shepherd loses its pirate captain

What happens when an organisation founded on radical activism decides to work with, instead of against, authorities?  For Captain Paul Watson that conundrum has led to an acrimonious split from the organisation that he started, Sea Shepherd. Watson has been hailed by some as a hero for his exploits against whaling ships on the high seas — but others say he’s an ‘eco-terrorist’ who has given environmentalism a bad name. Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe on whether this is the end for Paul Watson’s brand of high-stakes environmentalism. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter, Instagram and TikTok Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe.

20:31

18 Oct 22

Kylie Moore-Gilbert on the Iranian protests

The notorious Evin prison in Iran, which holds the Islamic Republic’s political prisoners, was on fire over the weekend. Around the country, protests that began over the death of a woman in police custody have now morphed into a broad anti-government movement – the most significant in years. This time, protesters are being more daring than ever before. Some are calling for the death of Iran’s supreme leader and flaunting Iran’s strict morality laws in the streets. Today, scholar of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies and one-time detainee at Evin Prison Dr Kylie Moore-Gilbert on how far the Iranian protesters are willing to go. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Scholar of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies. She spent 804 days in prison in Iran, Dr Kylie Moore-Gilbert

Kylie Moore-Gilbert on the Iranian protests

The notorious Evin prison in Iran, which holds the Islamic Republic’s political prisoners, was on fire over the weekend. Around the country, protests that began over the death of a woman in police custody have now morphed into a broad anti-government movement – the most significant in years. This time, protesters are being more daring than ever before. Some are calling for the death of Iran’s supreme leader and flaunting Iran’s strict morality laws in the streets. Today, scholar of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies and one-time detainee at Evin Prison Dr Kylie Moore-Gilbert on how far the Iranian protesters are willing to go. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Scholar of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies. She spent 804 days in prison in Iran, Dr Kylie Moore-Gilbert

19:19

17 Oct 22

China’s 'leader for life': Kevin Rudd on Xi Jinping

Xi Jinping is ascending to a historic level of power. He is the leader of the Chinese Communist Party, which has 95 million people who are members, and is the most powerful President of China since Chairman Mao. Now, he is becoming what some experts have called China’s ‘leader for life’. That makes him one of the most powerful men in history. Today, former prime minister of Australia Kevin Rudd on the coronation of Xi Jinping and how his ideology has changed China forever. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Former prime minister of Australia, Dr Kevin Rudd.

China’s 'leader for life': Kevin Rudd on Xi Jinping

Xi Jinping is ascending to a historic level of power. He is the leader of the Chinese Communist Party, which has 95 million people who are members, and is the most powerful President of China since Chairman Mao. Now, he is becoming what some experts have called China’s ‘leader for life’. That makes him one of the most powerful men in history. Today, former prime minister of Australia Kevin Rudd on the coronation of Xi Jinping and how his ideology has changed China forever. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Former prime minister of Australia, Dr Kevin Rudd.

22:59

16 Oct 22

The Weekend Read: Cate Kennedy on the collective power of song

Today, author Cate Kennedy reads her piece from the latest edition of the Monthly.  Beginning in the first months of lockdown, it asks the question: why did so many people turn to collective song and music, while stuck in isolation? Choirs conducted over video chat and jam sessions in the digital world might not be a perfect replacement for the connection of performing together in a room – but it seemed like there was something essential in the act of coming together to create music. So what is it about song that can pull us out of isolation? Cate will read her story, ‘How lockdowns rekindled our need to sing together’ after a short conversation with the Editor of the 7am podcast, Scott Mitchell.  To hear more weekend reads, you can subscribe to 'The Weekend Read', in Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts.  Guest: Author, Cate Kennedy Background reading: How lockdowns rekindled our need to sing together

The Weekend Read: Cate Kennedy on the collective power of song

Today, author Cate Kennedy reads her piece from the latest edition of the Monthly.  Beginning in the first months of lockdown, it asks the question: why did so many people turn to collective song and music, while stuck in isolation? Choirs conducted over video chat and jam sessions in the digital world might not be a perfect replacement for the connection of performing together in a room – but it seemed like there was something essential in the act of coming together to create music. So what is it about song that can pull us out of isolation? Cate will read her story, ‘How lockdowns rekindled our need to sing together’ after a short conversation with the Editor of the 7am podcast, Scott Mitchell.  To hear more weekend reads, you can subscribe to 'The Weekend Read', in Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts.  Guest: Author, Cate Kennedy Background reading: How lockdowns rekindled our need to sing together

17:56

15 Oct 22

Setting the cultural agenda: The Monthly one-on-one with Tony Burke

Arts policy in Australia has been virtually non-existent for ten years, and in those ten years the arts have suffered enormously. Today, we bring you an exclusive one-on-one interview between the editor of The Monthly, Michael Williams, and the man who says he wants to save the arts: Arts Minister Tony Burke. The challenges are huge. From music and live gigs, to literature and publishing, to film and television – every part of the sector has been damaged by years of funding uncertainty. Then, when Covid-19 first struck, arts workers weren’t supported and many are still recovering from the professional and financial devastation. The new Labor government is promising to deliver a new National Cultural Policy, to give the sector certainty. But behind the promises and kind words, will there be any money to spend? And can politicians stay out of the way of good arts funding? Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram.

Setting the cultural agenda: The Monthly one-on-one with Tony Burke

Arts policy in Australia has been virtually non-existent for ten years, and in those ten years the arts have suffered enormously. Today, we bring you an exclusive one-on-one interview between the editor of The Monthly, Michael Williams, and the man who says he wants to save the arts: Arts Minister Tony Burke. The challenges are huge. From music and live gigs, to literature and publishing, to film and television – every part of the sector has been damaged by years of funding uncertainty. Then, when Covid-19 first struck, arts workers weren’t supported and many are still recovering from the professional and financial devastation. The new Labor government is promising to deliver a new National Cultural Policy, to give the sector certainty. But behind the promises and kind words, will there be any money to spend? And can politicians stay out of the way of good arts funding? Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram.

28:22

14 Oct 22

Albanese can’t be haunted by Labor’s ghosts

The Labor party keeps saying this coming budget is full of hard decisions. We know the budget is already in deficit, but services are underfunded and if the government wants to improve childcare, disability care and more, then money will have to come from somewhere. Anthony Albanese has vigorously ruled out dumping the expensive stage three tax cuts. So what is left on the table for Labor to turn to? Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on whether Labor is brave enough to make big changes to the economy. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.  

Albanese can’t be haunted by Labor’s ghosts

The Labor party keeps saying this coming budget is full of hard decisions. We know the budget is already in deficit, but services are underfunded and if the government wants to improve childcare, disability care and more, then money will have to come from somewhere. Anthony Albanese has vigorously ruled out dumping the expensive stage three tax cuts. So what is left on the table for Labor to turn to? Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on whether Labor is brave enough to make big changes to the economy. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.  

18:48

13 Oct 22

Will we ever be dry again?

Much of the country has been hit by torrential rain, and communities across Victoria and New South Wales are inundated with floodwaters. But this is just the start, as according to the Bureau of Meteorology we could be facing an entire summer of floods and cyclones. As Australia braces for the worsening effects of the climate crisis, experts say we are still too focused on disaster relief and that adapting and preparing communities for disaster is underfunded. Today, a lead author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s sixth global climate change assessment report, Dr Johanna Nalau, on the summer ahead and why we need to adapt to live through the climate crisis. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Lead author for the IPCC’s Sixth Assessment Report, Dr Johanna Nalau.

Will we ever be dry again?

Much of the country has been hit by torrential rain, and communities across Victoria and New South Wales are inundated with floodwaters. But this is just the start, as according to the Bureau of Meteorology we could be facing an entire summer of floods and cyclones. As Australia braces for the worsening effects of the climate crisis, experts say we are still too focused on disaster relief and that adapting and preparing communities for disaster is underfunded. Today, a lead author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s sixth global climate change assessment report, Dr Johanna Nalau, on the summer ahead and why we need to adapt to live through the climate crisis. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Lead author for the IPCC’s Sixth Assessment Report, Dr Johanna Nalau.

19:23

12 Oct 22

Are we on the brink of global recession?

Yesterday, Treasurer Jim Chalmers offered a grim warning to Australia: we could be on the brink of a global recession. While Australians are already familiar with inflated prices and rising interest rates, the global financial outlook is getting worse. What does it mean for Australians? And if a downturn happens, who will be worst affected? Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe on how the United States could be making a global recession more likely. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe

Are we on the brink of global recession?

Yesterday, Treasurer Jim Chalmers offered a grim warning to Australia: we could be on the brink of a global recession. While Australians are already familiar with inflated prices and rising interest rates, the global financial outlook is getting worse. What does it mean for Australians? And if a downturn happens, who will be worst affected? Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe on how the United States could be making a global recession more likely. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe

19:58

11 Oct 22

What Labor says about unemployment behind closed doors

Labor has been shy to propose any major changes to the unemployment system. During the election, it ruled out raising the rate of unemployment benefits and while in opposition, it offered support to the coalition’s new ‘Workforce Australia’ scheme for the way job services operate. But now we have new insight into what Labor is saying behind closed doors and the new government appears far from happy about what it’s discovered in the unemployment sector. Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton, on mutual obligations – and the first signs that the system might change. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton.

What Labor says about unemployment behind closed doors

Labor has been shy to propose any major changes to the unemployment system. During the election, it ruled out raising the rate of unemployment benefits and while in opposition, it offered support to the coalition’s new ‘Workforce Australia’ scheme for the way job services operate. But now we have new insight into what Labor is saying behind closed doors and the new government appears far from happy about what it’s discovered in the unemployment sector. Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton, on mutual obligations – and the first signs that the system might change. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton.

19:33

10 Oct 22

Zoe Daniel on the power of Julia Gillard's misogyny speech

Ten years ago the then-prime minister Julia Gillard delivered a speech to parliament about misogyny. At the time, the speech was poorly received by the Canberra press gallery and described by some journalists as "desperate". But online, it took on a life of its own. Now, what has become known as the misogyny speech can be found on merchandise, in TikTok videos, and is used as shorthand for a particular sense of frustration at sexism in Australian politics. Today, Independent MP for the seat of Goldstein Zoe Daniel on the forgotten history of the speech and why it still resonates with so many people today. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Independent MP for Goldstein, Zoe Daniel

Zoe Daniel on the power of Julia Gillard's misogyny speech

Ten years ago the then-prime minister Julia Gillard delivered a speech to parliament about misogyny. At the time, the speech was poorly received by the Canberra press gallery and described by some journalists as "desperate". But online, it took on a life of its own. Now, what has become known as the misogyny speech can be found on merchandise, in TikTok videos, and is used as shorthand for a particular sense of frustration at sexism in Australian politics. Today, Independent MP for the seat of Goldstein Zoe Daniel on the forgotten history of the speech and why it still resonates with so many people today. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Independent MP for Goldstein, Zoe Daniel

21:13

9 Oct 22

Is Albanese about to axe the stage three tax cuts?

They are the tax cuts Scott Morrison promised and Anthony Albanese said he would deliver. If Australia cancels the stage three tax cuts, experts say we could properly fund services like the NDIS and raise unemployment benefits above the poverty line, among other desperately needed measures. If Australia keeps the cuts, some of the wealthiest tax payers will benefit and our tax system will become less progressive. Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on whether Labor could be ready to slowly ditch the stage three tax cuts.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

Is Albanese about to axe the stage three tax cuts?

They are the tax cuts Scott Morrison promised and Anthony Albanese said he would deliver. If Australia cancels the stage three tax cuts, experts say we could properly fund services like the NDIS and raise unemployment benefits above the poverty line, among other desperately needed measures. If Australia keeps the cuts, some of the wealthiest tax payers will benefit and our tax system will become less progressive. Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on whether Labor could be ready to slowly ditch the stage three tax cuts.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

20:31

6 Oct 22

Vladimir Putin has unleashed dangerous forces in Russia

Earlier this week, Vladimir Putin held a rally in Moscow. Even as Russia continued to lose ground in his war in Ukraine, he was defiant; calling the west satanic and making the case for a greater Russian empire. But the most significant thing about what Putin said that day was what it represented: a turn to the ultra-nationalism of the Russian far-right. Today, Associate Professor at the ANU Strategic and Defence Studies Centre Matthew Sussex on what Putin is doing now that he is desperate and what he could unleash. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Associate Professor at the ANU Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, Matthew Sussex.

Vladimir Putin has unleashed dangerous forces in Russia

Earlier this week, Vladimir Putin held a rally in Moscow. Even as Russia continued to lose ground in his war in Ukraine, he was defiant; calling the west satanic and making the case for a greater Russian empire. But the most significant thing about what Putin said that day was what it represented: a turn to the ultra-nationalism of the Russian far-right. Today, Associate Professor at the ANU Strategic and Defence Studies Centre Matthew Sussex on what Putin is doing now that he is desperate and what he could unleash. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Associate Professor at the ANU Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, Matthew Sussex.

20:45

5 Oct 22

Decline of the IPA: How the right’s favourite think tank ran out of ideas

For decades now some of the most important public policy that's shaped our country hasn’t been designed by politicians or public servants – it has come from think tanks. Among the most influential in Australia is the Institute of Public Affairs, the IPA, a right-wing think tank that prides itself on being the policy brain of the conservative movement. But the organisation is in decline, it’s generating less new ideas and it’s finding it harder to get the support of business. Today, national correspondent at The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe on the decline of the IPA. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: National correspondent at The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe

Decline of the IPA: How the right’s favourite think tank ran out of ideas

For decades now some of the most important public policy that's shaped our country hasn’t been designed by politicians or public servants – it has come from think tanks. Among the most influential in Australia is the Institute of Public Affairs, the IPA, a right-wing think tank that prides itself on being the policy brain of the conservative movement. But the organisation is in decline, it’s generating less new ideas and it’s finding it harder to get the support of business. Today, national correspondent at The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe on the decline of the IPA. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: National correspondent at The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe

21:21

4 Oct 22

Reducing good teachers to a single test

All of us know that a great teacher can make a huge difference in a person’s life – and a bad one can be a disaster for a young person who’s trying to find their way. So how do we make sure the best people become teachers? That’s the question that obsessed Julia Gillard when she was Education minister in 2008. The answer she came up with has had some unforeseen consequences that teachers are still living with now. Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton on the testing regime for Australian teachers that was inspired by an American consultancy firm. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton.

Reducing good teachers to a single test

All of us know that a great teacher can make a huge difference in a person’s life – and a bad one can be a disaster for a young person who’s trying to find their way. So how do we make sure the best people become teachers? That’s the question that obsessed Julia Gillard when she was Education minister in 2008. The answer she came up with has had some unforeseen consequences that teachers are still living with now. Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton on the testing regime for Australian teachers that was inspired by an American consultancy firm. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton.

21:09

3 Oct 22

Nigel Farage, the pornographer and their weird Australian tour

The right-wing anti-immigration politician who led the Brexit campaign in Britain is currently touring Australia. Nigel Farage has become increasingly irrelevant in British politics, but he is commanding speaking fees and being given a hero's welcome by Sky News presenters and One Nation politicians It could be a cynical money grabbing exercise, a play for political influence in Australia… or both. Today, journalist Kurt Johnson on the Nigel Farage tour, the figures behind it and the global franchise of right-wing populists. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Journalist, Kurt Johnson

Nigel Farage, the pornographer and their weird Australian tour

The right-wing anti-immigration politician who led the Brexit campaign in Britain is currently touring Australia. Nigel Farage has become increasingly irrelevant in British politics, but he is commanding speaking fees and being given a hero's welcome by Sky News presenters and One Nation politicians It could be a cynical money grabbing exercise, a play for political influence in Australia… or both. Today, journalist Kurt Johnson on the Nigel Farage tour, the figures behind it and the global franchise of right-wing populists. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Journalist, Kurt Johnson

20:10

2 Oct 22

The trauma of robo-debt is finally being investigated

Mothers whose families were torn apart by the robo-debt scheme have welcomed the start of the long-awaited royal commission into the policy this week. One, Kath Madgwick, said her son took his own life just hours after learning he owed a Centrelink debt through the scheme – she’ll be making a submission to the royal commission. But this week’s hearings are only the beginning of an attempt to hold people accountable over what happened.  Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno, on how the commission is trying to find the truth for the victims of robo-debt, and the future of integrity in our parliament. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

The trauma of robo-debt is finally being investigated

Mothers whose families were torn apart by the robo-debt scheme have welcomed the start of the long-awaited royal commission into the policy this week. One, Kath Madgwick, said her son took his own life just hours after learning he owed a Centrelink debt through the scheme – she’ll be making a submission to the royal commission. But this week’s hearings are only the beginning of an attempt to hold people accountable over what happened.  Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno, on how the commission is trying to find the truth for the victims of robo-debt, and the future of integrity in our parliament. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

19:24

29 Sep 22

The Optus hack: How 10 million people got pwned

Millions of Australians will need new drivers licences and passports, after Optus’s lax data management exposed the details of around 10 million Australians to a hacker. Anthony Albanese has announced Optus should foot the bill for new ID documents and has called the hack a ‘wake up’ for corporate Australia. But why did Optus hold so much data on millions of Australians? Why wasn’t it held more safely? Today, associate professor Toby Murray from the School of Computing and Information Systems at the University of Melbourne - on how millions of Australians are now exposed – and what we need to do about it. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Associate professor, Toby Murray.

The Optus hack: How 10 million people got pwned

Millions of Australians will need new drivers licences and passports, after Optus’s lax data management exposed the details of around 10 million Australians to a hacker. Anthony Albanese has announced Optus should foot the bill for new ID documents and has called the hack a ‘wake up’ for corporate Australia. But why did Optus hold so much data on millions of Australians? Why wasn’t it held more safely? Today, associate professor Toby Murray from the School of Computing and Information Systems at the University of Melbourne - on how millions of Australians are now exposed – and what we need to do about it. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Associate professor, Toby Murray.

20:06

28 Sep 22

‘A shell of a hospital’: opening new facilities without more staff

As populations move and grow, communities are in desperate need of more hospitals. But what good is a building without staff? What good is a bed without the nurses and doctors to care for someone in it? That’s the question one state is facing, after it was revealed that NSW Health believe they will need billions more in operational budgets to sufficiently staff the new hospitals that are being opened. Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton on the big shiny hospitals without enough staff to run them. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton  

‘A shell of a hospital’: opening new facilities without more staff

As populations move and grow, communities are in desperate need of more hospitals. But what good is a building without staff? What good is a bed without the nurses and doctors to care for someone in it? That’s the question one state is facing, after it was revealed that NSW Health believe they will need billions more in operational budgets to sufficiently staff the new hospitals that are being opened. Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton on the big shiny hospitals without enough staff to run them. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton  

20:23

27 Sep 22

'This is not justice': the law keeping more people locked up after their sentence

If you are ever jailed for a crime, you would hope to do your time in jail and be released at the end of it. For a small number of people who are deemed to pose an exceptional risk to society, such as sexual offenders and terrorists, that hasn’t always been the case – and in some jurisdictions they can be kept in jail or given harsh restrictions long after they leave. But now those exceptions are expanding — other offences are increasingly subject to what is called ‘preventative detention’. Today, journalist Kieran Pender on the question of who gets to walk free at the end of their sentence. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Journalist, Kieran Pender.

'This is not justice': the law keeping more people locked up after their sentence

If you are ever jailed for a crime, you would hope to do your time in jail and be released at the end of it. For a small number of people who are deemed to pose an exceptional risk to society, such as sexual offenders and terrorists, that hasn’t always been the case – and in some jurisdictions they can be kept in jail or given harsh restrictions long after they leave. But now those exceptions are expanding — other offences are increasingly subject to what is called ‘preventative detention’. Today, journalist Kieran Pender on the question of who gets to walk free at the end of their sentence. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Journalist, Kieran Pender.

21:28

26 Sep 22

‘Collective delusion’: Why Britain can’t face up to the empire’s past

Last week on the public holiday to mourn the Queen's death, there were protests against the monarchy in major cities across Australia.  The marches represented many who harbour a resentment towards the British crown and the unhealed wounds inflicted by the British Empire. In the UK, some people feel the same way and not all Britons participated in the scenes of public grieving that have been seen around the world. Today, the United Kingdom’s first Professor of Black Studies and author of The New Age of Empire, Kehinde Andrews, on what the monarchy represents today.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Professor of Black Studies and author of The New Age of Empire, Kehinde Andrews

‘Collective delusion’: Why Britain can’t face up to the empire’s past

Last week on the public holiday to mourn the Queen's death, there were protests against the monarchy in major cities across Australia.  The marches represented many who harbour a resentment towards the British crown and the unhealed wounds inflicted by the British Empire. In the UK, some people feel the same way and not all Britons participated in the scenes of public grieving that have been seen around the world. Today, the United Kingdom’s first Professor of Black Studies and author of The New Age of Empire, Kehinde Andrews, on what the monarchy represents today.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Professor of Black Studies and author of The New Age of Empire, Kehinde Andrews

17:38

25 Sep 22

How agencies access personal phone data

Police and security agencies often have access to a wealth of personal information about the people they’re investigating — including phone calls, texts, emails and metadata. Access to that information is supposed to occur under very controlled circumstances. But there’s evidence that’s not what’s happening.  A report has found that police and other agencies routinely break the law in handling private data, and despite warnings - their conduct is getting worse rather than better. Today, chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton on what happens when the people in charge of law enforcement, act outside the law themselves.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton

How agencies access personal phone data

Police and security agencies often have access to a wealth of personal information about the people they’re investigating — including phone calls, texts, emails and metadata. Access to that information is supposed to occur under very controlled circumstances. But there’s evidence that’s not what’s happening.  A report has found that police and other agencies routinely break the law in handling private data, and despite warnings - their conduct is getting worse rather than better. Today, chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton on what happens when the people in charge of law enforcement, act outside the law themselves.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton

16:24

22 Sep 22

Spotlight: A night at the opera — How Whitlam and Kerr fell out

After a 10-year legal battle, the “palace letters” were finally released. In full, they show how Gough Whitlam’s relationship with the governor-general broke down - and how involved the Queen was through this collapse. Today, we revisit our episode from 2020 with chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton.

Spotlight: A night at the opera — How Whitlam and Kerr fell out

After a 10-year legal battle, the “palace letters” were finally released. In full, they show how Gough Whitlam’s relationship with the governor-general broke down - and how involved the Queen was through this collapse. Today, we revisit our episode from 2020 with chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton.

19:16

21 Sep 22

How much will Labor pay to hold refugees on Nauru?

Next year will be 10 years since Australia began offshore processing – sending refugees that arrived by boat to places like Papua New Guinea and Nauru. It would be easy to assume that with a change of government, and deals with the US and New Zealand to take refugees – that offshore processing was a thing of the past. It’s not, and the Albanese government looks like it is on the verge of signing a multi-million dollar deal to keep detention facilities on Nauru running. Today, national correspondent at The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe on the ongoing moral and financial cost of Australia’s offshore processing regime. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: National Correspondent at The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe

How much will Labor pay to hold refugees on Nauru?

Next year will be 10 years since Australia began offshore processing – sending refugees that arrived by boat to places like Papua New Guinea and Nauru. It would be easy to assume that with a change of government, and deals with the US and New Zealand to take refugees – that offshore processing was a thing of the past. It’s not, and the Albanese government looks like it is on the verge of signing a multi-million dollar deal to keep detention facilities on Nauru running. Today, national correspondent at The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe on the ongoing moral and financial cost of Australia’s offshore processing regime. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: National Correspondent at The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe

19:04

20 Sep 22

The dirty secrets inside one of our biggest casinos

The very idea of a casino was invented with the involvement of the American mafia. But for decades we’ve been reassured that everything at Australian casinos is above board.  They’re supposed to beheavily regulated, closely monitored, and operated by reputable, publicly-traded corporations. But what we were told about many casinos in Australia is now unravelling, and we’re getting staggering insight into how regulators can be misled and the strange schemes that have been allowed to flourish inside our biggest gambling businesses. Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton, on exactly what has been happening behind the scenes at The Star Casino.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton

The dirty secrets inside one of our biggest casinos

The very idea of a casino was invented with the involvement of the American mafia. But for decades we’ve been reassured that everything at Australian casinos is above board.  They’re supposed to beheavily regulated, closely monitored, and operated by reputable, publicly-traded corporations. But what we were told about many casinos in Australia is now unravelling, and we’re getting staggering insight into how regulators can be misled and the strange schemes that have been allowed to flourish inside our biggest gambling businesses. Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton, on exactly what has been happening behind the scenes at The Star Casino.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton

22:40

19 Sep 22

The Charles formerly known as Prince

King Charles III is now Australia’s head of state. As with all members of the Royal Family, the appearance of Charles’ political neutrality will be carefully protected. Although, we do have some clues about some of his opinions through hard won freedom of information cases. How much do we know about what he intends to do with the throne? What does he believe in? And how will that affect Australia? Today, historian and author of The Palace Letters, Professor Jenny Hocking, on King Charles. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: historian and author of The Palace Letters, Professor Jenny Hocking  

The Charles formerly known as Prince

King Charles III is now Australia’s head of state. As with all members of the Royal Family, the appearance of Charles’ political neutrality will be carefully protected. Although, we do have some clues about some of his opinions through hard won freedom of information cases. How much do we know about what he intends to do with the throne? What does he believe in? And how will that affect Australia? Today, historian and author of The Palace Letters, Professor Jenny Hocking, on King Charles. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: historian and author of The Palace Letters, Professor Jenny Hocking  

20:58

18 Sep 22

Australia is mourning the Queen longer than the UK

The Prime Minister Anthony Albanese will be in London on Monday, joining other world leaders at the funeral for the Queen. Parliament has been suspended in Canberra for a period of mourning that is longer than that of the UK parliament. So why is that? What are the rules for mourning the Queen, and who decides them? Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on Australia’s extended grieving. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

Australia is mourning the Queen longer than the UK

The Prime Minister Anthony Albanese will be in London on Monday, joining other world leaders at the funeral for the Queen. Parliament has been suspended in Canberra for a period of mourning that is longer than that of the UK parliament. So why is that? What are the rules for mourning the Queen, and who decides them? Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on Australia’s extended grieving. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

18:40

15 Sep 22

Russia suffers a stunning collapse in Ukraine

The Ukrainian army has swept across areas in north-eastern Ukraine. Russian troops appear to have been thin on the ground, unprepared and quick to retreat. The stunning collapse could be a turning point in the war, but it’s also increasing pressure on Vladimir Putin at home, with previously loyal politicians and media figures criticising the leadership and decision making by the Kremlin. Today, journalist Charles McPhedran on a humiliating Russian defeat in Ukraine. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Journalist, Charles McPhedran

Russia suffers a stunning collapse in Ukraine

The Ukrainian army has swept across areas in north-eastern Ukraine. Russian troops appear to have been thin on the ground, unprepared and quick to retreat. The stunning collapse could be a turning point in the war, but it’s also increasing pressure on Vladimir Putin at home, with previously loyal politicians and media figures criticising the leadership and decision making by the Kremlin. Today, journalist Charles McPhedran on a humiliating Russian defeat in Ukraine. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Journalist, Charles McPhedran

20:13

14 Sep 22

Why being a renter is getting more expensive

Across the country, rents are going up. But it’s not because the value of the properties has risen - in fact values are largely going down. Instead, it has to do with the mortgage repayments of landlords, and the fact there’s not enough supply of rental properties at the moment. Rental stress in Australia is at a crisis point, with mental health and homelessness services raising the alarm. Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton on what’s happening to our rents. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton

Why being a renter is getting more expensive

Across the country, rents are going up. But it’s not because the value of the properties has risen - in fact values are largely going down. Instead, it has to do with the mortgage repayments of landlords, and the fact there’s not enough supply of rental properties at the moment. Rental stress in Australia is at a crisis point, with mental health and homelessness services raising the alarm. Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton on what’s happening to our rents. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton

16:35

13 Sep 22

Why a third wet summer could be the most dangerous yet

We could be in for another wet, cloudy summer.  The chances of another La Niña weather event are growing, and it’s now very likely the east coast of Australia will be drenched once again. That could make it the riskiest summer yet for flooding, with catchments still full and communities still regrouping. Today, climate scientist and lead author on the IPCC’s most recent climate assessment, Joëlle Gergis, on our never-ending stretch of rainy summers and what they mean for the climate disaster. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Author of Humanity’s Moment: A Climate Scientist’s Case for Hope, Joëlle Gergis.

Why a third wet summer could be the most dangerous yet

We could be in for another wet, cloudy summer.  The chances of another La Niña weather event are growing, and it’s now very likely the east coast of Australia will be drenched once again. That could make it the riskiest summer yet for flooding, with catchments still full and communities still regrouping. Today, climate scientist and lead author on the IPCC’s most recent climate assessment, Joëlle Gergis, on our never-ending stretch of rainy summers and what they mean for the climate disaster. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Author of Humanity’s Moment: A Climate Scientist’s Case for Hope, Joëlle Gergis.

17:13

12 Sep 22

The end of Queen Elizabeth II’s 70-year reign

Late last week, news broke that England’s longest reigning monarch, Queen Elizabeth II had died at the age of 96.  During her 70-year reign the Queen has steered the royal family through immense social and political change, and there are many who mourn her death.   But there is also a complex legacy of colonialism to grapple with, and questions are already beginning over whether Australia should now re-consider becoming a republic.  Today, historian Dr Cindy McCreery on Queen Elizabeth II’s legacy, and what’s next for the monarchy.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Historian Dr Cindy McCreery.

The end of Queen Elizabeth II’s 70-year reign

Late last week, news broke that England’s longest reigning monarch, Queen Elizabeth II had died at the age of 96.  During her 70-year reign the Queen has steered the royal family through immense social and political change, and there are many who mourn her death.   But there is also a complex legacy of colonialism to grapple with, and questions are already beginning over whether Australia should now re-consider becoming a republic.  Today, historian Dr Cindy McCreery on Queen Elizabeth II’s legacy, and what’s next for the monarchy.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Historian Dr Cindy McCreery.

22:53

11 Sep 22

Albanese's race to ease the cost of living

This week, rates rose to seven-year-highs and inflation still won’t be easing off anytime soon. Cost of living is a problem the government has promised it’s aware of, but there will be increasing pressure for it to start implementing practical solutions that actually help people who are struggling. So what is the Albanese government doing, how is it different and what can we expect the government to pass now that parliament is back? Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on Labor’s attempts to reign in a cost of living spiral. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.  

Albanese's race to ease the cost of living

This week, rates rose to seven-year-highs and inflation still won’t be easing off anytime soon. Cost of living is a problem the government has promised it’s aware of, but there will be increasing pressure for it to start implementing practical solutions that actually help people who are struggling. So what is the Albanese government doing, how is it different and what can we expect the government to pass now that parliament is back? Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on Labor’s attempts to reign in a cost of living spiral. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.  

17:45

8 Sep 22

Will Lachlan Murdoch beat Crikey in court?

Rupert Murdoch’s son, co-chair of News Corp, Lachlan Murdoch is suing a small independent publisher in Australia over an article it published on its website. The defamation suit, filed against Crikey a couple of weeks ago, could test Australia’s new public interest laws. Crikey says it wants to defend it, and force Lachlan Murdoch to prove his claims in court. But, the stakes couldn't be higher for the media company, which stands to lose three million dollars. Today, journalist and author, Paddy Manning on the likely successor to News Corp’s global empire vs Crikey. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Journalist and author, Paddy Manning.

Will Lachlan Murdoch beat Crikey in court?

Rupert Murdoch’s son, co-chair of News Corp, Lachlan Murdoch is suing a small independent publisher in Australia over an article it published on its website. The defamation suit, filed against Crikey a couple of weeks ago, could test Australia’s new public interest laws. Crikey says it wants to defend it, and force Lachlan Murdoch to prove his claims in court. But, the stakes couldn't be higher for the media company, which stands to lose three million dollars. Today, journalist and author, Paddy Manning on the likely successor to News Corp’s global empire vs Crikey. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Journalist and author, Paddy Manning.

18:44

7 Sep 22

Scott Morrison and the secretive $18m grant

Before he was voted out, the former Prime Minister Scott Morrison received a pitch from the Governor-General David Hurley: the taxpayer should fund a foundation for ‘future Australian leaders’. We don’t know much about the merits of the program, who would get selected and what kind of training they would get – but it was promised the funding. Now, with the secret ministries saga still hanging over Canberra, pressure is mounting to investigate whether there was enough transparency in the process of funding this mysterious leadership training program. Today, chief political correspondent at The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton, on Scott Morrison’s secretive $18 million leadership grant. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Chief political correspondent at The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton

Scott Morrison and the secretive $18m grant

Before he was voted out, the former Prime Minister Scott Morrison received a pitch from the Governor-General David Hurley: the taxpayer should fund a foundation for ‘future Australian leaders’. We don’t know much about the merits of the program, who would get selected and what kind of training they would get – but it was promised the funding. Now, with the secret ministries saga still hanging over Canberra, pressure is mounting to investigate whether there was enough transparency in the process of funding this mysterious leadership training program. Today, chief political correspondent at The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton, on Scott Morrison’s secretive $18 million leadership grant. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Chief political correspondent at The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton

17:06

6 Sep 22

What do the 35 new members of parliament believe in?

The federal election marked a change in direction for the country but it also signalled the beginning of 35 new political careers. As parliament returns once again, many of these newly elected parliamentarians are making their first speeches, a permanent record of their intentions that their actions in Canberra will be compared against. So what are they saying? And what do their speeches tell us about the challenges facing Australia right now?  Today, writer and contributor to The Monthly Sean Kelly on first speeches, optimism, and compromise. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Writer and contributor to The Monthly, Sean Kelly

What do the 35 new members of parliament believe in?

The federal election marked a change in direction for the country but it also signalled the beginning of 35 new political careers. As parliament returns once again, many of these newly elected parliamentarians are making their first speeches, a permanent record of their intentions that their actions in Canberra will be compared against. So what are they saying? And what do their speeches tell us about the challenges facing Australia right now?  Today, writer and contributor to The Monthly Sean Kelly on first speeches, optimism, and compromise. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Writer and contributor to The Monthly, Sean Kelly

20:30

5 Sep 22

Can Tanya Plibersek save the environment?

Tanya Plibersek is arguably Labor's most high-profile female politician.  Once described as the next female prime minister, she rose through the ranks to become deputy leader at one point, and was most recently the party’s education spokesperson.  But Labor’s election to power after almost a decade in opposition has had unexpected consequences for Plibersek – she’s found herself in a new portfolio, facing a new challenge.  And it’s a monumental one: she’s now the minister for the Environment and Water.  Today, writer and contributor to The Monthly, Chloe Hooper, takes us inside how Tanya Plibersek found herself here, and what she plans to do about it. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Contributor to The Monthly, Chloe Hooper.

Can Tanya Plibersek save the environment?

Tanya Plibersek is arguably Labor's most high-profile female politician.  Once described as the next female prime minister, she rose through the ranks to become deputy leader at one point, and was most recently the party’s education spokesperson.  But Labor’s election to power after almost a decade in opposition has had unexpected consequences for Plibersek – she’s found herself in a new portfolio, facing a new challenge.  And it’s a monumental one: she’s now the minister for the Environment and Water.  Today, writer and contributor to The Monthly, Chloe Hooper, takes us inside how Tanya Plibersek found herself here, and what she plans to do about it. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Contributor to The Monthly, Chloe Hooper.

23:10

4 Sep 22

The Weekend Read: Jock Serong on the coral windows to our oceans’ past and future

Today, journalist and author Jock Serong will be reading his piece from the latest issue. It's called 'Front-row seats to the end of the Reef' - in it he chronicles his residency at the Australian Institute of Marine Science, and what coral tells us about the past and future of our oceans. Guest: Journalist and author, Jock Serong Background reading: Front-row seats to the end of the Reef

The Weekend Read: Jock Serong on the coral windows to our oceans’ past and future

Today, journalist and author Jock Serong will be reading his piece from the latest issue. It's called 'Front-row seats to the end of the Reef' - in it he chronicles his residency at the Australian Institute of Marine Science, and what coral tells us about the past and future of our oceans. Guest: Journalist and author, Jock Serong Background reading: Front-row seats to the end of the Reef

12:14

3 Sep 22

The truth about the jobs summit: it's the descent that kills you

Labor has been spruiking its Jobs and Skills Summit for months, but is the gathering live up to the hype?  Anthony Albanese has spent his senior political career insisting that what’s good for workers is good for employees – a belief that has allowed him, according to his colleagues, to build good relations with both unions and business leaders. Now Labor is attempting to put that assertion into practice. Columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on the promises and perils of Labor’s Jobs and Skills Summit. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

The truth about the jobs summit: it's the descent that kills you

Labor has been spruiking its Jobs and Skills Summit for months, but is the gathering live up to the hype?  Anthony Albanese has spent his senior political career insisting that what’s good for workers is good for employees – a belief that has allowed him, according to his colleagues, to build good relations with both unions and business leaders. Now Labor is attempting to put that assertion into practice. Columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on the promises and perils of Labor’s Jobs and Skills Summit. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

19:46

1 Sep 22

‘If they want to survive, time for them to run’: Ukraine’s new plan

There are signs that Ukraine has begun its biggest counter-offensive yet to win back territory held by Russian forces. It's too soon to know if the operation will succeed or how concerted the effort will be - but there’s no doubt that a new battle in the war would be difficult and costly.   Meanwhile, Ukraine and its president Volodymyr Zelenskyy are also fighting the clock. Winter will make it difficult to take back ground and also signals the beginning of untold economic pain for the whole of Europe. Today, world editor for The Saturday Paper Jonathan Pearlman on the coalescing crises facing Europe, and what the next phase of the war in Ukraine will look like.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: World editor for The Saturday Paper, Jonathan Pearlman

‘If they want to survive, time for them to run’: Ukraine’s new plan

There are signs that Ukraine has begun its biggest counter-offensive yet to win back territory held by Russian forces. It's too soon to know if the operation will succeed or how concerted the effort will be - but there’s no doubt that a new battle in the war would be difficult and costly.   Meanwhile, Ukraine and its president Volodymyr Zelenskyy are also fighting the clock. Winter will make it difficult to take back ground and also signals the beginning of untold economic pain for the whole of Europe. Today, world editor for The Saturday Paper Jonathan Pearlman on the coalescing crises facing Europe, and what the next phase of the war in Ukraine will look like.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: World editor for The Saturday Paper, Jonathan Pearlman

20:37

31 Aug 22

New questions over whether Scott Morrison acted lawfully

Amid the controversy over Scott Morrison’s secret ministry appointments a new question has emerged: did the former Prime Minister act unconstitutionally? Advice from the Solicitor-General released last week found that Scott Morrison was legally appointed to the Resources portfolio under section 64 of the constitution. But rather than that being the end of the matter, it has raised a new question: was Morrison properly appointed under another section, section 65? Today, chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton on the question of whether Scott Morrison may have acted unlawfully. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton

New questions over whether Scott Morrison acted lawfully

Amid the controversy over Scott Morrison’s secret ministry appointments a new question has emerged: did the former Prime Minister act unconstitutionally? Advice from the Solicitor-General released last week found that Scott Morrison was legally appointed to the Resources portfolio under section 64 of the constitution. But rather than that being the end of the matter, it has raised a new question: was Morrison properly appointed under another section, section 65? Today, chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton on the question of whether Scott Morrison may have acted unlawfully. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton

19:41

30 Aug 22

Ghost cities: Is China’s economy about to crash?

A crisis that began in China’s housing market is now threatening to drag down the country’s entire economy.  If that happens, the repercussions will be felt across the globe, and nowhere more so than Australia – where our economy relies on what China buys from us. So just how unstable is the Chinese economy right now? And how did things change for the superpower once seen as an unstoppable economic force? Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe on the alarming signs in the Chinese economy, and what they could mean for us.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe.

Ghost cities: Is China’s economy about to crash?

A crisis that began in China’s housing market is now threatening to drag down the country’s entire economy.  If that happens, the repercussions will be felt across the globe, and nowhere more so than Australia – where our economy relies on what China buys from us. So just how unstable is the Chinese economy right now? And how did things change for the superpower once seen as an unstoppable economic force? Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe on the alarming signs in the Chinese economy, and what they could mean for us.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe.

21:27

29 Aug 22

Your order for employment rights has been cancelled: Deliveroo v Franco

Diego Franco was a food delivery rider. He worked for Uber, DoorDash and Deliveroo, to transport food in Australia. What happened to him, and his subsequent case at the Fair Work Commission was supposed to set a powerful precedent for people who work across the whole gig economy – and give workers in these industries the same rights as employees. But instead, his case faltered - and the reason was a High Court decision that he wasn’t a party to. Today, journalist and lawyer Kieran Pender on the story of Diego Franco and how it put the Fair Work Commission at loggerheads with the most powerful court in Australia. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Lawyer and journalist, Kieran Pender.

Your order for employment rights has been cancelled: Deliveroo v Franco

Diego Franco was a food delivery rider. He worked for Uber, DoorDash and Deliveroo, to transport food in Australia. What happened to him, and his subsequent case at the Fair Work Commission was supposed to set a powerful precedent for people who work across the whole gig economy – and give workers in these industries the same rights as employees. But instead, his case faltered - and the reason was a High Court decision that he wasn’t a party to. Today, journalist and lawyer Kieran Pender on the story of Diego Franco and how it put the Fair Work Commission at loggerheads with the most powerful court in Australia. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Lawyer and journalist, Kieran Pender.

19:19

28 Aug 22

Secret ministries are legal. Now what for Scott Morrison?

The Solicitor-General’s legal advice on Scott Morrison’s secret appointments painted a complex picture. What Morrison did was legal, but it fundamentally undermined principles of the constitution. So is that it? Should the country and Prime Minister Anthony Albanese move on? Or are there more questions to be answered? Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on the inquiry to come and if Anthony Albanese is overplaying his hand. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

Secret ministries are legal. Now what for Scott Morrison?

The Solicitor-General’s legal advice on Scott Morrison’s secret appointments painted a complex picture. What Morrison did was legal, but it fundamentally undermined principles of the constitution. So is that it? Should the country and Prime Minister Anthony Albanese move on? Or are there more questions to be answered? Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on the inquiry to come and if Anthony Albanese is overplaying his hand. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

18:53

25 Aug 22

Not getting paid enough? It's not just a feeling

Wages aren’t rising fast enough to keep up with inflation, and it means that many workers are actually falling behind. At the same time, the corporate profit share is going up – it's now at a record 31 per cent of Australia’s national income. These are the stakes for next week’s national job summit, where businesses, unions and economic experts will sit down with the new government to make their case for changes to our jobs, workplaces and our pay. Today, executive director of the Australia Institute Richard Denniss on how Australian wages stagnated… and what the federal government could be doing to fix that.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Executive director of the Australia Institute, Richard Denniss.

Not getting paid enough? It's not just a feeling

Wages aren’t rising fast enough to keep up with inflation, and it means that many workers are actually falling behind. At the same time, the corporate profit share is going up – it's now at a record 31 per cent of Australia’s national income. These are the stakes for next week’s national job summit, where businesses, unions and economic experts will sit down with the new government to make their case for changes to our jobs, workplaces and our pay. Today, executive director of the Australia Institute Richard Denniss on how Australian wages stagnated… and what the federal government could be doing to fix that.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Executive director of the Australia Institute, Richard Denniss.

19:38

24 Aug 22

The state that elected Pauline Hanson and Clive Palmer is changing

With the balance of power in the senate, the Greens hold significant sway over what gets done under this government. But at the same time, the dynamics within the Greens party room have dramatically transformed – out of 16 Greens parliamentarians, five are now from Queensland. So how will they change the Australian Greens and what agenda do they represent?  Today, journalist Paddy Manning on the Brisbane Greens and how their “radical agenda” began to appeal to Queenslanders. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Author of Inside the Greens, Paddy Manning

The state that elected Pauline Hanson and Clive Palmer is changing

With the balance of power in the senate, the Greens hold significant sway over what gets done under this government. But at the same time, the dynamics within the Greens party room have dramatically transformed – out of 16 Greens parliamentarians, five are now from Queensland. So how will they change the Australian Greens and what agenda do they represent?  Today, journalist Paddy Manning on the Brisbane Greens and how their “radical agenda” began to appeal to Queenslanders. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Author of Inside the Greens, Paddy Manning

16:02

23 Aug 22

What’s next in the Morrison ministries saga?

Today, the Prime Minister will reveal legal advice on Scott Morrison’s secret appointment to five ministries. While the country waits to hear about what legal dilemmas the affair entails, the former prime minister’s colleagues are responding both privately and publicly. The explanations from Morrison have left some unconvinced and there are still questions over the purpose of such a ministerial power grab. Today, chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton on the reaction of Scott Morrison’s former cabinet colleagues. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton

What’s next in the Morrison ministries saga?

Today, the Prime Minister will reveal legal advice on Scott Morrison’s secret appointment to five ministries. While the country waits to hear about what legal dilemmas the affair entails, the former prime minister’s colleagues are responding both privately and publicly. The explanations from Morrison have left some unconvinced and there are still questions over the purpose of such a ministerial power grab. Today, chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton on the reaction of Scott Morrison’s former cabinet colleagues. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton

18:27

22 Aug 22

What you need to know about monkeypox

The spread of monkeypox is testing public health officials worldwide.  It’s a virus that is challenging both our ability to get vaccines and medicines to the people who need them most - and the ability of health authorities to send the right message. So what is the right health message? And how do we empower communities, after they have been through two years of a Covid-19 pandemic? Today, science journalist Bianca Nogrady on the origins and challenges of the Monkeypox outbreak. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Science journalist Bianca Nogrady.

What you need to know about monkeypox

The spread of monkeypox is testing public health officials worldwide.  It’s a virus that is challenging both our ability to get vaccines and medicines to the people who need them most - and the ability of health authorities to send the right message. So what is the right health message? And how do we empower communities, after they have been through two years of a Covid-19 pandemic? Today, science journalist Bianca Nogrady on the origins and challenges of the Monkeypox outbreak. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Science journalist Bianca Nogrady.

19:53

21 Aug 22

Scott Morrison’s secret ministries: everything you need to know

It's the rolling scandal that has dominated the week in politics, and permanently marked Scott Morrison’s legacy. This week it emerged that while in power the former prime minister secretly swore himself into five different ministries: Health, Finance, Resources, Treasury, and Home Affairs. The public didn’t know, his former government colleagues didn’t know, and in most cases, the very ministers in those portfolios didn’t know. Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on the perplexing question of why Scott Morrison kept secretly giving himself more ministerial powers. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.  

Scott Morrison’s secret ministries: everything you need to know

It's the rolling scandal that has dominated the week in politics, and permanently marked Scott Morrison’s legacy. This week it emerged that while in power the former prime minister secretly swore himself into five different ministries: Health, Finance, Resources, Treasury, and Home Affairs. The public didn’t know, his former government colleagues didn’t know, and in most cases, the very ministers in those portfolios didn’t know. Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on the perplexing question of why Scott Morrison kept secretly giving himself more ministerial powers. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.  

21:15

18 Aug 22

Australia’s biggest tax bludgers REVEALED

Australia’s wealthiest postcodes and the millionaires who pay no tax have been revealed in the latest data drop from the Tax Office. It gives us new insight into who has wealth in Australia, how they keep a hold on that wealth and whether the taxation system is fair. Today, author and professor Chris Wallace on who the real burdens are on our economy. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Author and professor Chris Wallace.

Australia’s biggest tax bludgers REVEALED

Australia’s wealthiest postcodes and the millionaires who pay no tax have been revealed in the latest data drop from the Tax Office. It gives us new insight into who has wealth in Australia, how they keep a hold on that wealth and whether the taxation system is fair. Today, author and professor Chris Wallace on who the real burdens are on our economy. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Author and professor Chris Wallace.

18:40

17 Aug 22

What the FBI found at Donald Trump’s home

Right-wing groups in the US are holding armed rallies against the FBI, with one field office of the bureau attacked by a gunman. A raid last week by agents on Donald Trump’s Florida residence, Mar-a-Lago, opened the floodgates of anger after classified government documents were found on the premises.  Trump has now called for calm, but maintains the FBI’s raid was part of a witch-hunt and that he has done nothing wrong. Today, world editor at The Saturday Paper Jonathan Pearlman on what the FBI were looking for when they raided Trump’s home. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: World editor for The Saturday Paper, Jonathan Pearlman. Background reading: FBI raid of Trump’s Florida home sparks Republican fury

What the FBI found at Donald Trump’s home

Right-wing groups in the US are holding armed rallies against the FBI, with one field office of the bureau attacked by a gunman. A raid last week by agents on Donald Trump’s Florida residence, Mar-a-Lago, opened the floodgates of anger after classified government documents were found on the premises.  Trump has now called for calm, but maintains the FBI’s raid was part of a witch-hunt and that he has done nothing wrong. Today, world editor at The Saturday Paper Jonathan Pearlman on what the FBI were looking for when they raided Trump’s home. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: World editor for The Saturday Paper, Jonathan Pearlman. Background reading: FBI raid of Trump’s Florida home sparks Republican fury

18:40

16 Aug 22

How the John Barilaro ‘sh**show’ engulfed a government

It started with a job: $500,000 to be a trade envoy in New York. Now, an entire state government has become embroiled in a scandal over job appointments and how they get made. As Australia prepares to implement a federal anti-corruption body, in New South Wales – the state that first put in place an independent anti-corruption commission – we're learning a lot about why we need more transparency in politics. Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton, on the job offer that threatens to engulf the entire NSW government. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton.

How the John Barilaro ‘sh**show’ engulfed a government

It started with a job: $500,000 to be a trade envoy in New York. Now, an entire state government has become embroiled in a scandal over job appointments and how they get made. As Australia prepares to implement a federal anti-corruption body, in New South Wales – the state that first put in place an independent anti-corruption commission – we're learning a lot about why we need more transparency in politics. Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton, on the job offer that threatens to engulf the entire NSW government. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton.

20:17

15 Aug 22

One year since the fall of Kabul: Who was left behind?

It’s been one year since the Taliban swifty took control of Afghanistan as the US pulled out after 20 years of war.  In the days following the takeover, foreign countries rushed to evacuate diplomatic staff from Kabul. Thousands of Afghans were also airlifted out, but many, even those who worked directly with Australia and other foreign nations remain trapped.  Today, chief political correspondent for *The Saturday Paper* Karen Middleton reveals the details of a deal struck in the last few weeks by the Australian government – with Afghans who worked with Australia being told to cross the border into Pakistan – undocumented. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton.

One year since the fall of Kabul: Who was left behind?

It’s been one year since the Taliban swifty took control of Afghanistan as the US pulled out after 20 years of war.  In the days following the takeover, foreign countries rushed to evacuate diplomatic staff from Kabul. Thousands of Afghans were also airlifted out, but many, even those who worked directly with Australia and other foreign nations remain trapped.  Today, chief political correspondent for *The Saturday Paper* Karen Middleton reveals the details of a deal struck in the last few weeks by the Australian government – with Afghans who worked with Australia being told to cross the border into Pakistan – undocumented. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton.

19:39

14 Aug 22

China warns Australia to pipe down on Taiwan

China has a message for Australia: be quiet and take the trade money. In a chilling speech, China’s ambassador to Australia laid out his nation’s aims with startling honesty – including that China would pursue what he called ‘reunification’ with Taiwan at any cost. The reason he was sending that message has everything to do with US Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s recent visit to Taiwan, which raised the threat of conflict in the region. Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on China’s message to Australia. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.  

China warns Australia to pipe down on Taiwan

China has a message for Australia: be quiet and take the trade money. In a chilling speech, China’s ambassador to Australia laid out his nation’s aims with startling honesty – including that China would pursue what he called ‘reunification’ with Taiwan at any cost. The reason he was sending that message has everything to do with US Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s recent visit to Taiwan, which raised the threat of conflict in the region. Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on China’s message to Australia. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.  

19:47

11 Aug 22

Megan Davis on what’s next for the Voice

When a Voice to Parliament was first proposed in the Uluru Statement from the Heart – it was dismissed by then-prime minister Malcolm Turnbull. It seemed possible the proposal might never be put in front of the Australian people. But Australians could soon get to vote in a referendum and we will be asked whether Australia should amend its constitution to create an Indigenous Voice to parliament. Today, someone who has spent years working towards constitutional recognition: chair in constitutional law at the University of NSW, Megan Davis. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Chair in constitutional law at the University of NSW, Megan Davis.

Megan Davis on what’s next for the Voice

When a Voice to Parliament was first proposed in the Uluru Statement from the Heart – it was dismissed by then-prime minister Malcolm Turnbull. It seemed possible the proposal might never be put in front of the Australian people. But Australians could soon get to vote in a referendum and we will be asked whether Australia should amend its constitution to create an Indigenous Voice to parliament. Today, someone who has spent years working towards constitutional recognition: chair in constitutional law at the University of NSW, Megan Davis. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Chair in constitutional law at the University of NSW, Megan Davis.

21:22

10 Aug 22

The secret jailing of an Australian spy

A former intelligence officer in Canberra, known as Witness J, was charged, sentenced, and jailed in complete secrecy in 2018. It was only after he brought his own legal complaint, and journalists noticed some security guards in the courthouse, that anything about his case was made public.  Now, as fragments of the proceedings against the man known as Alan Johns filter out, we’re learning what happens when our spy agencies go to court. Today, Chief Political Correspondent at The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton, on the case of Alan Johns. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: chief political correspondent at The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton

The secret jailing of an Australian spy

A former intelligence officer in Canberra, known as Witness J, was charged, sentenced, and jailed in complete secrecy in 2018. It was only after he brought his own legal complaint, and journalists noticed some security guards in the courthouse, that anything about his case was made public.  Now, as fragments of the proceedings against the man known as Alan Johns filter out, we’re learning what happens when our spy agencies go to court. Today, Chief Political Correspondent at The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton, on the case of Alan Johns. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: chief political correspondent at The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton

20:00

9 Aug 22

The school funding gap the Coalition left behind

The new government has inherited a problem that no one wants to talk about: the deep inequality of funding between public and private and independent schools. That discrepancy is most evident when it comes to the way that students with disabilities are funded. Today, senior reporter at The Saturday Paper Rick Morton reveals the $600 million funding shortfall for students with a disability in the public system. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton.

The school funding gap the Coalition left behind

The new government has inherited a problem that no one wants to talk about: the deep inequality of funding between public and private and independent schools. That discrepancy is most evident when it comes to the way that students with disabilities are funded. Today, senior reporter at The Saturday Paper Rick Morton reveals the $600 million funding shortfall for students with a disability in the public system. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton.

18:43

8 Aug 22

The threat to our food is here to stay

Our food supply is facing violent shocks — pandemic, war, and floods. And the threat to food security is unprecedented.  Underpinning the problem is the catastrophe of climate change, which will impact not only us but our neighbours too — creating implications for national security.  Today, Esther Linder on a looming food crisis that Australia isn’t prepared for, and what it means for the way we eat. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Journalist for The Saturday Paper, Esther Linder.

The threat to our food is here to stay

Our food supply is facing violent shocks — pandemic, war, and floods. And the threat to food security is unprecedented.  Underpinning the problem is the catastrophe of climate change, which will impact not only us but our neighbours too — creating implications for national security.  Today, Esther Linder on a looming food crisis that Australia isn’t prepared for, and what it means for the way we eat. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Journalist for The Saturday Paper, Esther Linder.

16:05

7 Aug 22

The Weekend Read: Bronwyn Adcock on a terror suspect held for almost 20 years without trial

Today on the show, journalist and author Bronwyn Adcock will be reading her piece from the latest issue.  It follows the fate of Encep ‘Hambali’ Nurjaman - a man arrested as a central figure in the Bali Bombings nearly 20 years ago - and interrogates his fraught path to justice in the War on Terror, through CIA black spots and Guantanamo Bay, torture and rendition, and bureaucratic obfuscation.  Guest: Journalist and author, Bronwyn Adcock Background reading: The Trial in The Monthly.

The Weekend Read: Bronwyn Adcock on a terror suspect held for almost 20 years without trial

Today on the show, journalist and author Bronwyn Adcock will be reading her piece from the latest issue.  It follows the fate of Encep ‘Hambali’ Nurjaman - a man arrested as a central figure in the Bali Bombings nearly 20 years ago - and interrogates his fraught path to justice in the War on Terror, through CIA black spots and Guantanamo Bay, torture and rendition, and bureaucratic obfuscation.  Guest: Journalist and author, Bronwyn Adcock Background reading: The Trial in The Monthly.

28:40

6 Aug 22

How Peter Dutton is making himself irrelevant

Labor's first fortnight in power has been marked by a significant win — a successful agreement to pass a bill that would see a 43 per cent emissions reduction target become law. That agreement was made entirely without the opposition, with Peter Dutton effectively removing his party from negotiations at the beginning of the week. So what is the Coalition’s strategy, when it comes to climate, or to just being in opposition? Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on what Dutton is telling his party room, and the divisions already becoming apparent in the Coalition.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.  

How Peter Dutton is making himself irrelevant

Labor's first fortnight in power has been marked by a significant win — a successful agreement to pass a bill that would see a 43 per cent emissions reduction target become law. That agreement was made entirely without the opposition, with Peter Dutton effectively removing his party from negotiations at the beginning of the week. So what is the Coalition’s strategy, when it comes to climate, or to just being in opposition? Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on what Dutton is telling his party room, and the divisions already becoming apparent in the Coalition.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.  

17:13

4 Aug 22

Inside the Greens' climate deal with Labor

For more than ten years, the Greens and the Labor Party have been blaming each other for holding back progress on climate action.  Now, things have shifted — Labor’s new emissions reduction target will almost certainly become legislation, after the Greens announced that they’ll support it.  But that support has only come after fierce negotiations and several concessions from the Albanese government. Today, national correspondent at The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe on the high-stakes political games that are going to decide our climate future. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe.

Inside the Greens' climate deal with Labor

For more than ten years, the Greens and the Labor Party have been blaming each other for holding back progress on climate action.  Now, things have shifted — Labor’s new emissions reduction target will almost certainly become legislation, after the Greens announced that they’ll support it.  But that support has only come after fierce negotiations and several concessions from the Albanese government. Today, national correspondent at The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe on the high-stakes political games that are going to decide our climate future. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe.

18:21

3 Aug 22

For some renters, being evicted is a death sentence

As a homelessness crisis escalates around the country, there’s one jurisdiction where the situation is particularly stark.  In the wealthiest state in Australia, more than 120 people have died on the streets in the past two years.  And while the causes of homelessness are complex, there’s no doubt Western Australia’s tenancy laws are making things worse: especially when it comes to “no grounds” rental evictions.  Today, writer and campaigner Jesse Noakes on the deadly consequences of evictions, and the new push to protect renters.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Journalist, Jesse Noakes.

For some renters, being evicted is a death sentence

As a homelessness crisis escalates around the country, there’s one jurisdiction where the situation is particularly stark.  In the wealthiest state in Australia, more than 120 people have died on the streets in the past two years.  And while the causes of homelessness are complex, there’s no doubt Western Australia’s tenancy laws are making things worse: especially when it comes to “no grounds” rental evictions.  Today, writer and campaigner Jesse Noakes on the deadly consequences of evictions, and the new push to protect renters.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Journalist, Jesse Noakes.

17:21

2 Aug 22

The party within a party: How Labor’s factions work

An investigation into factional misconduct in Victoria has created debate about how the Labor Party is structured and how it can be reformed. The stakes are incredibly high for the party: not only is some of the conduct illegal and undemocratic, but it also risks losses in seats where independents are likely to run on integrity. Today, Labor speechwriter and contributor to The Saturday Paper Dennis Glover on the party within a party.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Labor speechwriter and contributor to The Saturday Paper Dennis Glover.

The party within a party: How Labor’s factions work

An investigation into factional misconduct in Victoria has created debate about how the Labor Party is structured and how it can be reformed. The stakes are incredibly high for the party: not only is some of the conduct illegal and undemocratic, but it also risks losses in seats where independents are likely to run on integrity. Today, Labor speechwriter and contributor to The Saturday Paper Dennis Glover on the party within a party.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Labor speechwriter and contributor to The Saturday Paper Dennis Glover.

17:53

1 Aug 22

Omicron #3: Stuck between anger and denial

As Australia faces a new wave of Covid-19 variants, experts say the country has a chance to plot a different course with the virus. That involves acknowledging that it is not going away - that it will be here for a long time, and that masks and ventilation will be needed to manage it. Today, lead researcher at the Kirby Institute Raina MacIntyre on hope, denial and Covid-19. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Lead researcher at the Kirby Institute Raina MacIntyre.

Omicron #3: Stuck between anger and denial

As Australia faces a new wave of Covid-19 variants, experts say the country has a chance to plot a different course with the virus. That involves acknowledging that it is not going away - that it will be here for a long time, and that masks and ventilation will be needed to manage it. Today, lead researcher at the Kirby Institute Raina MacIntyre on hope, denial and Covid-19. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Lead researcher at the Kirby Institute Raina MacIntyre.

16:19

31 Jul 22

Another test for Anthony Albanese

After five years of inaction, the Albanese government has made implementing the Uluru Statement from the Heart a key item of business. Anthony Albanese has described it as a hand held out to the country. But there are still questions over whether a referendum will succeed. Senator Patrick Dodson is telling colleagues they should put it up regardless - if the vote is lost, the country will have to live with it. Today, columnist from The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on the first week of a new parliament.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

Another test for Anthony Albanese

After five years of inaction, the Albanese government has made implementing the Uluru Statement from the Heart a key item of business. Anthony Albanese has described it as a hand held out to the country. But there are still questions over whether a referendum will succeed. Senator Patrick Dodson is telling colleagues they should put it up regardless - if the vote is lost, the country will have to live with it. Today, columnist from The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on the first week of a new parliament.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram. Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

18:49

28 Jul 22

‘He saw the sky turn crimson the day the bomb was dropped’

Labor is working through the specifics of the nuclear submarine deal Scott Morrison set up before he lost office. Some in the party believe AUKUS was established in part to wedge Labor on the issue of non-proliferation. So what is next for the plan to buy nuclear submarines? And what can Labor do to ensure their purchase doesn’t undermine a commitment to ending nuclear wars? Today, chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton on the one of the biggest projects Australia is undertaking.   Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton

‘He saw the sky turn crimson the day the bomb was dropped’

Labor is working through the specifics of the nuclear submarine deal Scott Morrison set up before he lost office. Some in the party believe AUKUS was established in part to wedge Labor on the issue of non-proliferation. So what is next for the plan to buy nuclear submarines? And what can Labor do to ensure their purchase doesn’t undermine a commitment to ending nuclear wars? Today, chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton on the one of the biggest projects Australia is undertaking.   Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton

18:06

27 Jul 22

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The Weekend Read

Listen to Australia's best writers and thinkers read out longform essays from The Monthly magazine, the country's leading publication on politics, current affairs and culture.

Everybody Knows

Everybody Knows

A five-part investigative series examining the rise and fall of the MeToo movement in Australia, and what it will take for things to finally change.