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7am is a daily news podcast. It is the big story, the news that defines the moment. It's what you need to know: who's involved, what it means and why it matters. It's news with narrative, every weekday. 7am is questioning and idiosyncratic

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#News & Opinion

Episodes


The Jim Chalmers Interview

This week, Jim Chalmers delivered what could be the most politically significant budget of his career – with the future of a Labor government and the country’s cost of living crisis on the line. Today, he joins 7am to discuss his vision for Australia’s economy and whether the government has done enough to end the living crisis. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Treasurer of Australia, Dr Jim Chalmers

The Jim Chalmers Interview

This week, Jim Chalmers delivered what could be the most politically significant budget of his career – with the future of a Labor government and the country’s cost of living crisis on the line. Today, he joins 7am to discuss his vision for Australia’s economy and whether the government has done enough to end the living crisis. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Treasurer of Australia, Dr Jim Chalmers

21:39

16 May 24

The pitches from budget critics: How do they stack up?

It’s a budget we’ll be talking about for a long time, as we head to the next election and try to escape the cost of living crisis. But even though the budget is only 36 hours old, we’re starting to see the early criticisms from rival politicians emerge. So, has Labor spent enough to ease the cost of living? Or spent too much? And do the critics have plans of their own that would actually benefit Australians? Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on where the battle lines are being drawn. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

The pitches from budget critics: How do they stack up?

It’s a budget we’ll be talking about for a long time, as we head to the next election and try to escape the cost of living crisis. But even though the budget is only 36 hours old, we’re starting to see the early criticisms from rival politicians emerge. So, has Labor spent enough to ease the cost of living? Or spent too much? And do the critics have plans of their own that would actually benefit Australians? Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on where the battle lines are being drawn. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

18:22

15 May 24

A budget built to fight an election

Jim Chalmers delivered what could be the most important budget of his political career last night. But how much will it help with the cost of living and how will we feel the impact? Today, chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Barlow on the budget that’s attempting to reshape Australia’s response to the living crisis. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Barlow 

A budget built to fight an election

Jim Chalmers delivered what could be the most important budget of his political career last night. But how much will it help with the cost of living and how will we feel the impact? Today, chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Barlow on the budget that’s attempting to reshape Australia’s response to the living crisis. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Barlow 

17:53

14 May 24

Skipping meals, dumpster diving and cereal for dinner

It’s budget week, which means crunch time for the leaders tasked with tackling how expensive Australia is right now. And the thing we’re all talking about is our grocery bills, why food seems to cost more each time we visit the supermarket. Today, national affairs correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe on what some call the great price gouge and whether the government is doing enough to address the rising cost of putting food on our plates. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: National affairs correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe

Skipping meals, dumpster diving and cereal for dinner

It’s budget week, which means crunch time for the leaders tasked with tackling how expensive Australia is right now. And the thing we’re all talking about is our grocery bills, why food seems to cost more each time we visit the supermarket. Today, national affairs correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe on what some call the great price gouge and whether the government is doing enough to address the rising cost of putting food on our plates. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: National affairs correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe

20:46

13 May 24

Australia, the ‘land of suck-it-up’

This week, as the federal budget is handed down, we’re bringing you The Cost: Inside the living crisis. We’ll explore the impact this crisis is having on our country, why it just isn’t ending and whether our leaders are doing enough to protect our standard of living. Today, executive director of the Australia Institute Richard Denniss on when prices will finally stop going up – and the kind of country we risk becoming once the crisis is finally over. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Executive director of the Australia Institute, Richard Denniss

Australia, the ‘land of suck-it-up’

This week, as the federal budget is handed down, we’re bringing you The Cost: Inside the living crisis. We’ll explore the impact this crisis is having on our country, why it just isn’t ending and whether our leaders are doing enough to protect our standard of living. Today, executive director of the Australia Institute Richard Denniss on when prices will finally stop going up – and the kind of country we risk becoming once the crisis is finally over. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Executive director of the Australia Institute, Richard Denniss

22:37

12 May 24

‘A viper’s nest’: How Karen Webb became top cop

The tasering of a 95-year-old grandmother, the double-murder of a Surry Hills couple, the Bruce Lehrmann defamation trial and now the spike in domestic violence. These are some of the biggest stories in Australia over the past 12 months, and all of them have drawn in one very powerful woman – Karen Webb, the commissioner of the NSW Police Force. The veteran cop has found herself at press conferences and interviews having to defend herself and the force to a national audience. Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton, on who Karen Webb really is and how she climbed her way through the vipers nest of the NSW police. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton

‘A viper’s nest’: How Karen Webb became top cop

The tasering of a 95-year-old grandmother, the double-murder of a Surry Hills couple, the Bruce Lehrmann defamation trial and now the spike in domestic violence. These are some of the biggest stories in Australia over the past 12 months, and all of them have drawn in one very powerful woman – Karen Webb, the commissioner of the NSW Police Force. The veteran cop has found herself at press conferences and interviews having to defend herself and the force to a national audience. Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton, on who Karen Webb really is and how she climbed her way through the vipers nest of the NSW police. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton

21:34

9 May 24

Why big gas is putting money into MasterChef

One of Australia’s favourite shows has a contentious sponsor this year. MasterChef, a show that delivers fairytale stories of home cooks rising to national celebrity, is being supported by the gas industry. So what does big gas want with MasterChef? And what are they paying for? Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe, on the fight over the future of our kitchens and whether the gas industry can survive their next major elimination challenge.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe

Why big gas is putting money into MasterChef

One of Australia’s favourite shows has a contentious sponsor this year. MasterChef, a show that delivers fairytale stories of home cooks rising to national celebrity, is being supported by the gas industry. So what does big gas want with MasterChef? And what are they paying for? Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe, on the fight over the future of our kitchens and whether the gas industry can survive their next major elimination challenge.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe

20:30

8 May 24

On the verge of an invasion of Rafah, is a ceasefire possible?

Israeli airstrikes are targeting the southernmost city in Gaza and tanks have been seen entering the outskirts of the city. Rafah was once the last safe haven in Gaza, where civilians fleeing Israeli bombardment had been told to seek refuge. The United States, along with international allies, have long pushed for Israel not to invade the city. Today, Middle East correspondent for The Economist Gregg Carlstrom, on Rafah and what it would take to clinch a last-ditch ceasefire deal. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Middle east correspondent for The Economist, Gregg Carlstrom

On the verge of an invasion of Rafah, is a ceasefire possible?

Israeli airstrikes are targeting the southernmost city in Gaza and tanks have been seen entering the outskirts of the city. Rafah was once the last safe haven in Gaza, where civilians fleeing Israeli bombardment had been told to seek refuge. The United States, along with international allies, have long pushed for Israel not to invade the city. Today, Middle East correspondent for The Economist Gregg Carlstrom, on Rafah and what it would take to clinch a last-ditch ceasefire deal. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Middle east correspondent for The Economist, Gregg Carlstrom

18:31

7 May 24

The lobbyists behind Peter Dutton’s nuclear promise

It’s a small mystery in Australian politics: Why was Peter Dutton’s first major policy as opposition leader a promise to build nuclear power plants? On the surface, it doesn’t seem like an obvious vote winner and early polling shows most Australians are yet to be convinced. But this may be less about votes and more about holding the Coalition together, with the help of a lobby group most of us have never heard of. Today, investigative journalist and contributor to The Monthly Marian Wilkinson on the Coalition for Conservation lobby and their links to Peter Dutton’s nuclear promises. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Investigative journalist and contributor to The Monthly, Marian Wilkinson

The lobbyists behind Peter Dutton’s nuclear promise

It’s a small mystery in Australian politics: Why was Peter Dutton’s first major policy as opposition leader a promise to build nuclear power plants? On the surface, it doesn’t seem like an obvious vote winner and early polling shows most Australians are yet to be convinced. But this may be less about votes and more about holding the Coalition together, with the help of a lobby group most of us have never heard of. Today, investigative journalist and contributor to The Monthly Marian Wilkinson on the Coalition for Conservation lobby and their links to Peter Dutton’s nuclear promises. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Investigative journalist and contributor to The Monthly, Marian Wilkinson

21:25

6 May 24

David McBride as he faces sentencing

In recent years, Australia has faced a reckoning over the actions of some of our special forces soldiers, who have gone from decorated heroes to murderers accused of horrific war crimes against civilians. David McBride is the former military lawyer who first gave journalists documentary evidence of civilian killings in Afghanistan. To his supporters he’s a war crimes whistleblower, but detractors say that was never his motivation. During a secretive national security trial, he pleaded guilty to handing over those files and this morning his sentencing hearing gets underway. Today, David McBride, on why he did it, whether he has any regrets and how Australia keeps its secrets. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: David McBride

David McBride as he faces sentencing

In recent years, Australia has faced a reckoning over the actions of some of our special forces soldiers, who have gone from decorated heroes to murderers accused of horrific war crimes against civilians. David McBride is the former military lawyer who first gave journalists documentary evidence of civilian killings in Afghanistan. To his supporters he’s a war crimes whistleblower, but detractors say that was never his motivation. During a secretive national security trial, he pleaded guilty to handing over those files and this morning his sentencing hearing gets underway. Today, David McBride, on why he did it, whether he has any regrets and how Australia keeps its secrets. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: David McBride

21:09

5 May 24

The Weekend Read: Angela Savage on the moment a child leaves the home

Today, writer Angela Savage with her piece from a recent edition of The Monthly.  Parents often face the dilemma of helping their children become independent, while not wanting to let them go. Angela’s story, ‘Fledglings’, tells the story of what changes when that moment finally comes.

The Weekend Read: Angela Savage on the moment a child leaves the home

Today, writer Angela Savage with her piece from a recent edition of The Monthly.  Parents often face the dilemma of helping their children become independent, while not wanting to let them go. Angela’s story, ‘Fledglings’, tells the story of what changes when that moment finally comes.

16:17

4 May 24

Payments and a porn passport: Albanese’s snap national cabinet

As Australia demanded answers to the domestic violence crisis, Prime Minister Anthony Albanese became a focal point in all the wrong ways when he got into a confrontation with a rally organiser on Sunday. But this week’s national cabinet meeting with state and territory leaders offered a chance to respond to the community’s concern and produce real solutions. So what solutions came out of that meeting? And will they genuinely help women who face domestic violence? Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno, on the crucial moment for Australia and whether governments are delivering on their mission to end violence against women. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

Payments and a porn passport: Albanese’s snap national cabinet

As Australia demanded answers to the domestic violence crisis, Prime Minister Anthony Albanese became a focal point in all the wrong ways when he got into a confrontation with a rally organiser on Sunday. But this week’s national cabinet meeting with state and territory leaders offered a chance to respond to the community’s concern and produce real solutions. So what solutions came out of that meeting? And will they genuinely help women who face domestic violence? Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno, on the crucial moment for Australia and whether governments are delivering on their mission to end violence against women. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

18:53

2 May 24

The Australian journo on 'catch and kill' for Trump

As Donald Trump zeroed in on his successful 2016 run to the presidency, he began to engage in what is called “catch and kill” journalism. Trump and his lawyers developed relationships with journalists, who were allegedly prepared to track down damaging stories aboutTrump, and then take money to ensure they would never be printed. Today, managing editor of The Saturday Paper Emily Barrett on the Australian who built a reputation as one of the best at “capture and kill” in America – and how he’s ended up being central to Donald Trump’s trial in New York. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Managing editor of The Saturday Paper, Emily Barrett.

The Australian journo on 'catch and kill' for Trump

As Donald Trump zeroed in on his successful 2016 run to the presidency, he began to engage in what is called “catch and kill” journalism. Trump and his lawyers developed relationships with journalists, who were allegedly prepared to track down damaging stories aboutTrump, and then take money to ensure they would never be printed. Today, managing editor of The Saturday Paper Emily Barrett on the Australian who built a reputation as one of the best at “capture and kill” in America – and how he’s ended up being central to Donald Trump’s trial in New York. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Managing editor of The Saturday Paper, Emily Barrett.

18:48

1 May 24

Jess Hill on why we need more than ‘awareness’ to end the killing of women

It feels like hardly a week goes by where we don’t hear about a woman in Australia being killed by a man she knows. Intimate partner deaths increased by almost a third during the last reporting year and early counts by advocacy groups suggest this year is set to be even worse. The spike in killings has led to protests, a national outcry and Prime Minister Anthony Albanese declaring that violence against women is a national crisis. Today, author of See What You Made Me Do and journalist Jess Hill, on what can be done to stop the violence – and why “awareness” is no longer good enough. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Author of See What You Made Me Do and journalist Jess Hill

Jess Hill on why we need more than ‘awareness’ to end the killing of women

It feels like hardly a week goes by where we don’t hear about a woman in Australia being killed by a man she knows. Intimate partner deaths increased by almost a third during the last reporting year and early counts by advocacy groups suggest this year is set to be even worse. The spike in killings has led to protests, a national outcry and Prime Minister Anthony Albanese declaring that violence against women is a national crisis. Today, author of See What You Made Me Do and journalist Jess Hill, on what can be done to stop the violence – and why “awareness” is no longer good enough. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Author of See What You Made Me Do and journalist Jess Hill

21:07

30 Apr 24

How sales reps infiltrated operating theatres

There are strict rules around how drug company representatives can interact with doctors to ensure they aren’t influencing how medications are prescribed. But when it comes to expensive medical devices inserted in our bodies during surgery – all sorts of screws, pacemakers and implants – those same rules don’t apply. Medical device sales reps are scrubbed up and working in the operating theatre, even advising surgeons on which products to use. Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe, on whether the pursuit of profit risks driving clinical decisions. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe

How sales reps infiltrated operating theatres

There are strict rules around how drug company representatives can interact with doctors to ensure they aren’t influencing how medications are prescribed. But when it comes to expensive medical devices inserted in our bodies during surgery – all sorts of screws, pacemakers and implants – those same rules don’t apply. Medical device sales reps are scrubbed up and working in the operating theatre, even advising surgeons on which products to use. Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe, on whether the pursuit of profit risks driving clinical decisions. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe

16:52

29 Apr 24

‘A race towards minority’: Inside Labor’s re-election strategy

There’s an old adage in Canberra: every first-term government gets a second chance. But when voters head to the polls next year, could the current Labor government be an exception? With so many Australians feeling the cost-of-living crisis, and the government facing a slump in the polls, evidence is mounting that Labor will struggle to retain majority government. So what’s its strategy to change course? Today, special correspondent in Canberra for The Saturday Paper Jason Koutsoukis, on why Labor appears so calm in turbulent times. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Special correspondent in Canberra for The Saturday Paper Jason Koutsoukis

‘A race towards minority’: Inside Labor’s re-election strategy

There’s an old adage in Canberra: every first-term government gets a second chance. But when voters head to the polls next year, could the current Labor government be an exception? With so many Australians feeling the cost-of-living crisis, and the government facing a slump in the polls, evidence is mounting that Labor will struggle to retain majority government. So what’s its strategy to change course? Today, special correspondent in Canberra for The Saturday Paper Jason Koutsoukis, on why Labor appears so calm in turbulent times. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Special correspondent in Canberra for The Saturday Paper Jason Koutsoukis

17:49

28 Apr 24

Australia v Elon Musk: Can our politicians really take on the tech billionaire?

When Australia’s eSafety commissioner issued takedown orders to some of the world’s biggest tech companies at the beginning of this week, the commissioner probably didn’t realise it would put us on the frontline of a global battle over the internet. The orders were aimed at removing the kind of footage social media companies have agreed to remove in the past – but today things are very different, in large part because of Elon Musk. Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno, on why Elon Musk and his fans turned on Australia and how one Senator in particular, ended up in the firing line. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

Australia v Elon Musk: Can our politicians really take on the tech billionaire?

When Australia’s eSafety commissioner issued takedown orders to some of the world’s biggest tech companies at the beginning of this week, the commissioner probably didn’t realise it would put us on the frontline of a global battle over the internet. The orders were aimed at removing the kind of footage social media companies have agreed to remove in the past – but today things are very different, in large part because of Elon Musk. Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno, on why Elon Musk and his fans turned on Australia and how one Senator in particular, ended up in the firing line. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

17:40

25 Apr 24

'Outrageous and probably illegal': Offers to skip the queue at public hospitals

The wait for elective surgery in our public hospitals is longer than ever, but it seems there’s a way to jump the queue. If you can afford to pay for private care in a public hospital, you might find yourself being offered more perks than just a free bathrobe and some slippers. Today, lawyer and contributor to The Monthly Russell Marks, on whether our public health system is truly fair and what happens when your own child’s health is on the line. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Lawyer and contributor to The Monthly, Russell Marks

'Outrageous and probably illegal': Offers to skip the queue at public hospitals

The wait for elective surgery in our public hospitals is longer than ever, but it seems there’s a way to jump the queue. If you can afford to pay for private care in a public hospital, you might find yourself being offered more perks than just a free bathrobe and some slippers. Today, lawyer and contributor to The Monthly Russell Marks, on whether our public health system is truly fair and what happens when your own child’s health is on the line. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Lawyer and contributor to The Monthly, Russell Marks

17:27

24 Apr 24

The stabbing of a TikTok bishop

An attack at a Western Sydney church last week was inextricably linked to social media. The bishop who was stabbed is a social media celebrity, the attack itself was live-streamed, and both the attack and the reaction may have been inflamed by online extremism. The Australian government is so concerned it has picked a fight with the global social media giants X and Meta, ordering them to pull down content about the attack. Today, counter-terrorism expert and Lowy Institute fellow Lydia Khalill, on the attack, whether it was an act of terrorism and how we can do more to prevent extremism. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Project director of the Lowy Institute’s Digital Threats to Democracy Project and expert on counter-terrorism, Lydia Khalil

The stabbing of a TikTok bishop

An attack at a Western Sydney church last week was inextricably linked to social media. The bishop who was stabbed is a social media celebrity, the attack itself was live-streamed, and both the attack and the reaction may have been inflamed by online extremism. The Australian government is so concerned it has picked a fight with the global social media giants X and Meta, ordering them to pull down content about the attack. Today, counter-terrorism expert and Lowy Institute fellow Lydia Khalill, on the attack, whether it was an act of terrorism and how we can do more to prevent extremism. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Project director of the Lowy Institute’s Digital Threats to Democracy Project and expert on counter-terrorism, Lydia Khalil

19:16

23 Apr 24

Grace Tame is not a cat, she’s autistic

Grace Tame knows how to advocate. Her campaigning for survivors of sexual assault and abuse helped to create real change and pushed powerful institutions to be better. Now, Tame is turning her focus onto something she has lived with her whole life and which is now on the agenda in Canberra, – autism and neurodivergence. Today, former Australian of the Year and contributor to The Saturday Paper, Grace Tame, on Australia’s first attempt at a national autism strategy – and why we must get it right. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: former Australian of the year and Contributor to The Saturday Paper, Grace Tame

Grace Tame is not a cat, she’s autistic

Grace Tame knows how to advocate. Her campaigning for survivors of sexual assault and abuse helped to create real change and pushed powerful institutions to be better. Now, Tame is turning her focus onto something she has lived with her whole life and which is now on the agenda in Canberra, – autism and neurodivergence. Today, former Australian of the Year and contributor to The Saturday Paper, Grace Tame, on Australia’s first attempt at a national autism strategy – and why we must get it right. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: former Australian of the year and Contributor to The Saturday Paper, Grace Tame

18:34

22 Apr 24

Can Channel Seven survive the Lehrmann verdict?

It’s now been a week since the Federal Court of Australia’s Justice Michael Lee ruled it was substantially true that Bruce Lehrmann raped Brittney Higgins in a minister’s office at Parliament House back in 2019. In other cases, that may have been the end of the matter. But this case has drawn in dozens of characters, with careers ended, others on the rocks and Channel Seven appearing as if it could implode. Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton, on who emerges from the wreckage of one of the most dramatic defamation cases we’ve seen in years. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton

Can Channel Seven survive the Lehrmann verdict?

It’s now been a week since the Federal Court of Australia’s Justice Michael Lee ruled it was substantially true that Bruce Lehrmann raped Brittney Higgins in a minister’s office at Parliament House back in 2019. In other cases, that may have been the end of the matter. But this case has drawn in dozens of characters, with careers ended, others on the rocks and Channel Seven appearing as if it could implode. Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton, on who emerges from the wreckage of one of the most dramatic defamation cases we’ve seen in years. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton

20:14

21 Apr 24

The Weekend Read: Elizabeth Farrelly on the city of the future

Today, columnist Elizabeth Farrelly will read her piece about our modern cities and how they relate to the history of how humanity has imagined the perfect city. Farrelly is one of Australia’s foremost writers on urban development and the communities of our cities – having earned devoted readers at the Sydney Morning Herald and now at Schwartz Media, inThe Saturday Paper. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist Elizabeth Farrelly

The Weekend Read: Elizabeth Farrelly on the city of the future

Today, columnist Elizabeth Farrelly will read her piece about our modern cities and how they relate to the history of how humanity has imagined the perfect city. Farrelly is one of Australia’s foremost writers on urban development and the communities of our cities – having earned devoted readers at the Sydney Morning Herald and now at Schwartz Media, inThe Saturday Paper. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist Elizabeth Farrelly

21:10

20 Apr 24

The Great Housing Disaster: The minister for housing

At the end of the day, the people who decide what path Australia takes to solve the housing crisis are those in government. In this episode, we speak to the federal minister for housing, Julie Collins. Does the government think we’re in a crisis? How does she plan to ensure we all have a safe and affordable place to call home? And how will she convince voters in the next election that Labor has the boldest ideas? In this final episode of 7am’s five-part series, we dive into what the government is doing and whether there is more that could be done. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Federal minister for housing, Julie Collins

The Great Housing Disaster: The minister for housing

At the end of the day, the people who decide what path Australia takes to solve the housing crisis are those in government. In this episode, we speak to the federal minister for housing, Julie Collins. Does the government think we’re in a crisis? How does she plan to ensure we all have a safe and affordable place to call home? And how will she convince voters in the next election that Labor has the boldest ideas? In this final episode of 7am’s five-part series, we dive into what the government is doing and whether there is more that could be done. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Federal minister for housing, Julie Collins

22:59

18 Apr 24

The Great Housing Disaster: How to fix it

A solution to the housing crisis is one of the most sought-after ideas in Australia. Political careers, fortunes and the fate of a generation will rest on how we respond to the increasingly dire housing market, which means there are countless solutions to this crisis being debated throughout the country. In this episode of 7am’s five-part series, we explore four of these possible solutions to the crisis. You will hear from finance expert Alan Kohler, Greens spokesperson for housing Max Chandler Mather, housing advocate Maiy Azize and former deputy lord mayor of Sydney and author, Jess Scully. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Finance expert, Alan Kohler; Greens spokesperson for housing, Max Chandler Mather; housing advocate, Maiy Azize; former deputy lord mayor of Sydney and author of Glimpses of Utopia, Jess Scully.

The Great Housing Disaster: How to fix it

A solution to the housing crisis is one of the most sought-after ideas in Australia. Political careers, fortunes and the fate of a generation will rest on how we respond to the increasingly dire housing market, which means there are countless solutions to this crisis being debated throughout the country. In this episode of 7am’s five-part series, we explore four of these possible solutions to the crisis. You will hear from finance expert Alan Kohler, Greens spokesperson for housing Max Chandler Mather, housing advocate Maiy Azize and former deputy lord mayor of Sydney and author, Jess Scully. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Finance expert, Alan Kohler; Greens spokesperson for housing, Max Chandler Mather; housing advocate, Maiy Azize; former deputy lord mayor of Sydney and author of Glimpses of Utopia, Jess Scully.

27:24

17 Apr 24

The Great Housing Disaster: Who gets a say?

With federal, state and local governments promising to build more Australian homes, it’s fair to say that all levels of government want to fix the housing crisis. But are they building enough? Are they listening to the people they’re building it for? And who really benefits from the way we build housing in Australia? In this episode of 7am’s five-part special series on the housing crisis, we find out who gets a say when it comes to housing, and why that can get in the way of building the homes Australia needs. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Public housing tenant, Carolyn Ienna; Housing expert, Nicole Gurran; Sydney Editor of The Sydney Morning Herald, Michael Koziol.

The Great Housing Disaster: Who gets a say?

With federal, state and local governments promising to build more Australian homes, it’s fair to say that all levels of government want to fix the housing crisis. But are they building enough? Are they listening to the people they’re building it for? And who really benefits from the way we build housing in Australia? In this episode of 7am’s five-part special series on the housing crisis, we find out who gets a say when it comes to housing, and why that can get in the way of building the homes Australia needs. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Public housing tenant, Carolyn Ienna; Housing expert, Nicole Gurran; Sydney Editor of The Sydney Morning Herald, Michael Koziol.

29:16

16 Apr 24

The Great Housing Disaster: The renters' resistance

With home ownership out of reach, more and more younger Australians have no choice but to rent for much longer than their parents ever did – maybe for the rest of their lives. That puts younger Australians at the mercy of landlords, making some intensely angry and leading to what might be described as a “renters resistance”.  In this episode of 7am’s five-part special series on the housing crisis, we meet the people who are trying to make it better: the people who are mobilising, taking matters into their own hands and fighting back. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Tenant, Blake Hesketh; founder of shitrentals.org and social media figure, Jordan van den Berg; Senior lecturer in the School of Architecture, Design and Planning at the University of Sydney, Dr Sophia Maalsen.

The Great Housing Disaster: The renters' resistance

With home ownership out of reach, more and more younger Australians have no choice but to rent for much longer than their parents ever did – maybe for the rest of their lives. That puts younger Australians at the mercy of landlords, making some intensely angry and leading to what might be described as a “renters resistance”.  In this episode of 7am’s five-part special series on the housing crisis, we meet the people who are trying to make it better: the people who are mobilising, taking matters into their own hands and fighting back. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Tenant, Blake Hesketh; founder of shitrentals.org and social media figure, Jordan van den Berg; Senior lecturer in the School of Architecture, Design and Planning at the University of Sydney, Dr Sophia Maalsen.

29:05

15 Apr 24

The Great Housing Disaster: Who’s to blame?

This is the first episode of 7am’s new five-part special series on the housing crisis. What happened to housing in Australia over the past few decades wasn’t by chance. It’s the result of decades of deliberate decisions that have turned us into a nation of landlords and property speculators. This episode uncovers who broke the housing market, and introduces one of the few people who saw what was coming and tried to warn us. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Economist Saul Eslake; Television producer Julian Cress; Housing expert Professor Nicole Gurran

The Great Housing Disaster: Who’s to blame?

This is the first episode of 7am’s new five-part special series on the housing crisis. What happened to housing in Australia over the past few decades wasn’t by chance. It’s the result of decades of deliberate decisions that have turned us into a nation of landlords and property speculators. This episode uncovers who broke the housing market, and introduces one of the few people who saw what was coming and tried to warn us. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Economist Saul Eslake; Television producer Julian Cress; Housing expert Professor Nicole Gurran

28:28

14 Apr 24

Penny Wong’s plan to recognise Palestine

When Penny Wong took the lectern for the keynote speech at a conference on foreign affairs this week, she could have done what politicians usually do at these events. She could have delivered a mundane speech about the same challenges we all know Australia faces in its region. Instead, she decided to float the idea that Australia should recognise an independent Palestinian state. Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno, on what recognising a Palestinian state would mean – and why the foreign minister decided to talk about it now. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

Penny Wong’s plan to recognise Palestine

When Penny Wong took the lectern for the keynote speech at a conference on foreign affairs this week, she could have done what politicians usually do at these events. She could have delivered a mundane speech about the same challenges we all know Australia faces in its region. Instead, she decided to float the idea that Australia should recognise an independent Palestinian state. Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno, on what recognising a Palestinian state would mean – and why the foreign minister decided to talk about it now. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

19:17

11 Apr 24

Mark Zuckerberg is playing chicken with Australian news

Three years ago, Australia became the first nation in the world to make Facebook pay for news.  Now, those deals are about to expire, and Facebook isn’t willing to renew them. That leaves Australia’s world-first deal hanging by a thread, and if the conflict escalates, it could even lead to Facebook and its other products, Instagram and WhatsApp, pulling out of the Australian market completely. Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper and author of Media Unmade: Australian Media’s Most Disruptive Decade Tim Burrowes, on why the world is watching Mark Zuckerberg’s fight with the Australian media and government. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper and author of Media Unmade: Australian Media’s Most Disruptive Decade Tim Burrowes

Mark Zuckerberg is playing chicken with Australian news

Three years ago, Australia became the first nation in the world to make Facebook pay for news.  Now, those deals are about to expire, and Facebook isn’t willing to renew them. That leaves Australia’s world-first deal hanging by a thread, and if the conflict escalates, it could even lead to Facebook and its other products, Instagram and WhatsApp, pulling out of the Australian market completely. Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper and author of Media Unmade: Australian Media’s Most Disruptive Decade Tim Burrowes, on why the world is watching Mark Zuckerberg’s fight with the Australian media and government. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper and author of Media Unmade: Australian Media’s Most Disruptive Decade Tim Burrowes

18:37

10 Apr 24

Does the Immigration minister really believe in what he's doing?

Australian Border Force and Western Australian police spent the weekend searching for 15 men who had arrived in the country by boat. Eventually, all 15 were arrested and put on a flight to Nauru. The arrival of this boat comes as the federal government attempts to legislate controversial new laws, deflect criticism from the opposition and keep immigration off the political agenda. Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe, on the politician in the middle of it all – Immigration Minister Andrew Giles – and his surprising 23-year journey from asylum seeker lawyer to immigration minister. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe

Does the Immigration minister really believe in what he's doing?

Australian Border Force and Western Australian police spent the weekend searching for 15 men who had arrived in the country by boat. Eventually, all 15 were arrested and put on a flight to Nauru. The arrival of this boat comes as the federal government attempts to legislate controversial new laws, deflect criticism from the opposition and keep immigration off the political agenda. Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe, on the politician in the middle of it all – Immigration Minister Andrew Giles – and his surprising 23-year journey from asylum seeker lawyer to immigration minister. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe

18:27

9 Apr 24

The Lehrmann interview (Taylor's version)

Former Channel Seven producer Taylor Auerbach has given extraordinary evidence at Bruce Lehrmann’s trial against Channel Ten over defamation. Auerbach’s evidence is significant enough that the judge sensationally reopened the case, and it could impact the final verdict – but it has also led to explosive allegations that ask questions of the entire Australian media. So, what has Auerbach alleged and why has he come forward now? Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton, on the three men who are now at the centre of the Bruce Lehrmann defamation case. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton

The Lehrmann interview (Taylor's version)

Former Channel Seven producer Taylor Auerbach has given extraordinary evidence at Bruce Lehrmann’s trial against Channel Ten over defamation. Auerbach’s evidence is significant enough that the judge sensationally reopened the case, and it could impact the final verdict – but it has also led to explosive allegations that ask questions of the entire Australian media. So, what has Auerbach alleged and why has he come forward now? Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton, on the three men who are now at the centre of the Bruce Lehrmann defamation case. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton

23:11

8 Apr 24

The fossil fuel approval that wasn’t published

The Albanese government was elected on a sense of optimism for the climate movement. But nearly two years later, there’s a growing sense of unease from the climate movement and traditional owners towards the government in Canberra. So, what’s going on? How has this distrust emerged? And will it practically change how we all live with the consequences of climate change? Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper Royce Kurmelovs, on the bad blood brewing between the government and environmentalists. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper, Royce Kurmelovs

The fossil fuel approval that wasn’t published

The Albanese government was elected on a sense of optimism for the climate movement. But nearly two years later, there’s a growing sense of unease from the climate movement and traditional owners towards the government in Canberra. So, what’s going on? How has this distrust emerged? And will it practically change how we all live with the consequences of climate change? Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper Royce Kurmelovs, on the bad blood brewing between the government and environmentalists. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper, Royce Kurmelovs

18:12

7 Apr 24

Sophie Cunningham on remembering Georgia Blain

Today, author and editor Sophie Cunningham reads her piece from a recent edition of The Saturday Paper. Australian author Georgia Blain chronicled her battle with cancer in a monthly column for The Saturday Paper, sadly passing away in 2016. Blain is remembered in this piece by her friend of over two decades, Sophie Cunningham – championing her legacy as a writer of rare talent, with a clear-eyed gaze, and a capacity to talk about sadness without self-pity. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Author and editor, Sophie Cunningham

Sophie Cunningham on remembering Georgia Blain

Today, author and editor Sophie Cunningham reads her piece from a recent edition of The Saturday Paper. Australian author Georgia Blain chronicled her battle with cancer in a monthly column for The Saturday Paper, sadly passing away in 2016. Blain is remembered in this piece by her friend of over two decades, Sophie Cunningham – championing her legacy as a writer of rare talent, with a clear-eyed gaze, and a capacity to talk about sadness without self-pity. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Author and editor, Sophie Cunningham

15:02

6 Apr 24

The killing of Zomi Frankcom

Israel’s killing of seven aid workers in Gaza has been met with international outrage. The workers at World Central Kitchen, including an Australian woman named Zomi Frankcom, were providing critical relief to Palestinians in the form of food.  Their deaths now risk entrenching starvation further, as aid organisations begin to doubt whether they’re receiving the protections and safety they should be offered in a war zone.  Today, world editor for The Saturday Paper, Jonathan Pearlman, on Australia’s response to the Israeli attack and whether this is a turning point in the Middle East. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: World editor for The Saturday Paper and editor of Australian Foreign Affairs, Jonathan Pearlman

The killing of Zomi Frankcom

Israel’s killing of seven aid workers in Gaza has been met with international outrage. The workers at World Central Kitchen, including an Australian woman named Zomi Frankcom, were providing critical relief to Palestinians in the form of food.  Their deaths now risk entrenching starvation further, as aid organisations begin to doubt whether they’re receiving the protections and safety they should be offered in a war zone.  Today, world editor for The Saturday Paper, Jonathan Pearlman, on Australia’s response to the Israeli attack and whether this is a turning point in the Middle East. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: World editor for The Saturday Paper and editor of Australian Foreign Affairs, Jonathan Pearlman

20:56

4 Apr 24

Can a gag order slow down Donald Trump?

Donald Trump is known for being the loudest, most controversial and outburst-prone politician of our time.  Now, a judge has issued a gag order against him in an attempt to prevent further outbursts. Can Donald Trump really be told to be quiet? And will orders from the courts begin to hamper his chances of being re-elected as president? Today, senior fellow at the United States Studies Centre and author of Trump’s Australia Bruce Wolpe, on whether Trump’s legal battles are finally catching up with him. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior fellow at the United States Studies Centre, and author of Trump’s Australia, Bruce Wolpe

Can a gag order slow down Donald Trump?

Donald Trump is known for being the loudest, most controversial and outburst-prone politician of our time.  Now, a judge has issued a gag order against him in an attempt to prevent further outbursts. Can Donald Trump really be told to be quiet? And will orders from the courts begin to hamper his chances of being re-elected as president? Today, senior fellow at the United States Studies Centre and author of Trump’s Australia Bruce Wolpe, on whether Trump’s legal battles are finally catching up with him. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior fellow at the United States Studies Centre, and author of Trump’s Australia, Bruce Wolpe

18:28

3 Apr 24

Why the churches lobby is still so powerful in Canberra

Some of Australia’s most powerful religious bodies have taken aim at Prime Minister Anthony Albanese and also the Greens – accusing them of threatening the future of religious freedom. But the cause of this backlash is simply the possibility that the government would work with the Greens to reform a 40-year-old loophole in our discrimination laws. So, what’s really at stake? And is there about to be a showdown between religious lobbies and the prime minister? Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe, on religion’s influence in Canberra and the political strategy behind Albanese’s latest move.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe

Why the churches lobby is still so powerful in Canberra

Some of Australia’s most powerful religious bodies have taken aim at Prime Minister Anthony Albanese and also the Greens – accusing them of threatening the future of religious freedom. But the cause of this backlash is simply the possibility that the government would work with the Greens to reform a 40-year-old loophole in our discrimination laws. So, what’s really at stake? And is there about to be a showdown between religious lobbies and the prime minister? Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe, on religion’s influence in Canberra and the political strategy behind Albanese’s latest move.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe

18:52

2 Apr 24

Australia is exporting right wing media to the UK

With an election looming in the United Kingdom and chaos among the British Conservative Party, 2024 could see a new prime minister taking residence at 10 Downing Street.  Amid the political drama, a right-wing broadcaster named GB News has been stirring up debates, igniting culture wars and making headlines for its provocative social commentary. So, what is GB News? Who’s behind it? And what role has the Australian media played in its rise in popularity?  Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper, Amy Fallon, on the Australian inspiration behind Britain’s divisive broadcaster.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper, Amy Fallon

Australia is exporting right wing media to the UK

With an election looming in the United Kingdom and chaos among the British Conservative Party, 2024 could see a new prime minister taking residence at 10 Downing Street.  Amid the political drama, a right-wing broadcaster named GB News has been stirring up debates, igniting culture wars and making headlines for its provocative social commentary. So, what is GB News? Who’s behind it? And what role has the Australian media played in its rise in popularity?  Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper, Amy Fallon, on the Australian inspiration behind Britain’s divisive broadcaster.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper, Amy Fallon

19:13

1 Apr 24

Read This: Friends, Mary Beard Fans, Countrymen, Lend Me Your Ears

Over the long weekend, we're featuring episodes from the podcast Read This. Today, we have a treat for those who think about the Roman Empire more than once a week. Even if you’re not an obsessive Ancient Rome aficionado, you may have heard of Mary Beard. With more than 20 books to her name, including the wildly successful SPQR, Mary might be most famous for her work as a BBC host for shows such as Pompeii: Life and Death in a Roman Town and Julius Caesar Revealed. Her latest book is Emperor of Rome and this week on the show she sits down with Michael to discuss her life sentence — the half dozen words that set her on the path to becoming Britain’s best-known classicist — and why the Roman Empire is so misunderstood. Reading list: SPQR, Mary Beard, 2015 Twelve Caesars, Mary Beard, 2021 Emperor of Rome, Mary Beard, 2023 Meditations, Marcus Aurealius, 167 A.C.E.. Tidelines, Sarah Sasson, 2024 You can find these books and all the others we mentioned at your favourite independent book store.  Socials: Stay in touch with Read This on Instagram and Twitter Guest: Mary Beard

Read This: Friends, Mary Beard Fans, Countrymen, Lend Me Your Ears

Over the long weekend, we're featuring episodes from the podcast Read This. Today, we have a treat for those who think about the Roman Empire more than once a week. Even if you’re not an obsessive Ancient Rome aficionado, you may have heard of Mary Beard. With more than 20 books to her name, including the wildly successful SPQR, Mary might be most famous for her work as a BBC host for shows such as Pompeii: Life and Death in a Roman Town and Julius Caesar Revealed. Her latest book is Emperor of Rome and this week on the show she sits down with Michael to discuss her life sentence — the half dozen words that set her on the path to becoming Britain’s best-known classicist — and why the Roman Empire is so misunderstood. Reading list: SPQR, Mary Beard, 2015 Twelve Caesars, Mary Beard, 2021 Emperor of Rome, Mary Beard, 2023 Meditations, Marcus Aurealius, 167 A.C.E.. Tidelines, Sarah Sasson, 2024 You can find these books and all the others we mentioned at your favourite independent book store.  Socials: Stay in touch with Read This on Instagram and Twitter Guest: Mary Beard

33:36

31 Mar 24

Read This: No Dogs Die in Briohny Doyle's New Novel

Over the long weekend, we're featuring episodes from the podcast Read This. In this episode, host Michael Williams chats with author Briohny Doyle, whose most recent novel Why We Are Here explores the complexities of grief, both individual and collective. They discuss the role of writing during the pandemic and how relationships with non-human others enable us to access repressed parts of ourselves. Reading list: The Island Will Sink, Briohny Doyle, 2013 Adult Fantasy, Briohny Doyle, 2017 Echolalia, Briohny Doyle, 2021 Why We Are Here, Briohny Doyle, 2023 The Great Undoing, Sharlene Allsopp, 2024 Tremor, Teju Cole, 2023 You can find these books and all the others we mentioned at your favourite independent book store.  Socials: Stay in touch with Read This on Instagram and Twitter Guest: Briohny Doyle

Read This: No Dogs Die in Briohny Doyle's New Novel

Over the long weekend, we're featuring episodes from the podcast Read This. In this episode, host Michael Williams chats with author Briohny Doyle, whose most recent novel Why We Are Here explores the complexities of grief, both individual and collective. They discuss the role of writing during the pandemic and how relationships with non-human others enable us to access repressed parts of ourselves. Reading list: The Island Will Sink, Briohny Doyle, 2013 Adult Fantasy, Briohny Doyle, 2017 Echolalia, Briohny Doyle, 2021 Why We Are Here, Briohny Doyle, 2023 The Great Undoing, Sharlene Allsopp, 2024 Tremor, Teju Cole, 2023 You can find these books and all the others we mentioned at your favourite independent book store.  Socials: Stay in touch with Read This on Instagram and Twitter Guest: Briohny Doyle

33:47

28 Mar 24

What to know about the biggest Covid wave since Omicron

Many Australians could have been infected with Covid-19 for the second, third or even fourth time in the last couple of months. That’s because a new variant of the virus has caused the biggest wave in over a year. But while for many the symptoms are milder, and the risks of serious illness are dropping – what do we need to know about the new variants still emerging? And what evidence do we have about multiple reinfections? Today, applied mathematician, expert in respiratory diseases, and contributor to The Saturday Paper, Dr James Wood, on the latest Covid wave and what could be in store this year.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Applied mathematician, expert in respiratory diseases, and contributor to The Saturday Paper, Dr James Wood

What to know about the biggest Covid wave since Omicron

Many Australians could have been infected with Covid-19 for the second, third or even fourth time in the last couple of months. That’s because a new variant of the virus has caused the biggest wave in over a year. But while for many the symptoms are milder, and the risks of serious illness are dropping – what do we need to know about the new variants still emerging? And what evidence do we have about multiple reinfections? Today, applied mathematician, expert in respiratory diseases, and contributor to The Saturday Paper, Dr James Wood, on the latest Covid wave and what could be in store this year.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Applied mathematician, expert in respiratory diseases, and contributor to The Saturday Paper, Dr James Wood

18:53

27 Mar 24

Labor’s ‘shameful’ last-minute immigration bill

Yesterday, Labor’s emergency legislation on immigration detention was slammed by crossbenchers and the Greens as a “race to the bottom” on the way governments treat asylum seekers. But in the lead up to that move, criticisms that Labor is trying to be tougher than the Coalition on immigration laws have been growing louder.  So, why is Labor intent on being known for its hardline border policy? Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe on whether Labor is attempting to one up Peter Dutton on immigration.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: national correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe

Labor’s ‘shameful’ last-minute immigration bill

Yesterday, Labor’s emergency legislation on immigration detention was slammed by crossbenchers and the Greens as a “race to the bottom” on the way governments treat asylum seekers. But in the lead up to that move, criticisms that Labor is trying to be tougher than the Coalition on immigration laws have been growing louder.  So, why is Labor intent on being known for its hardline border policy? Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe on whether Labor is attempting to one up Peter Dutton on immigration.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: national correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe

18:33

26 Mar 24

Using psychotropic drugs to treat children

If a child experiences a complex mental health condition like psychosis, everyone would agree that someone at such a young age needs careful and considered care. If drugs are prescribed, the benefits must outweigh the risks.  But there are fears that isn’t always happening, and that growing demand for mental healthcare means the people who need the most specific treatment aren’t always getting it. Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper and author of The One Thing We’ve Never Spoken About, Elfy Scott, on how mental health care for young people is becoming an issue of equality. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper and author of ‘The One Thing We’ve Never Spoken About’, Elfy Scott

Using psychotropic drugs to treat children

If a child experiences a complex mental health condition like psychosis, everyone would agree that someone at such a young age needs careful and considered care. If drugs are prescribed, the benefits must outweigh the risks.  But there are fears that isn’t always happening, and that growing demand for mental healthcare means the people who need the most specific treatment aren’t always getting it. Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper and author of The One Thing We’ve Never Spoken About, Elfy Scott, on how mental health care for young people is becoming an issue of equality. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper and author of ‘The One Thing We’ve Never Spoken About’, Elfy Scott

19:22

25 Mar 24

Anjali Sharma on lobbying parliament from her dorm room

An Australian court once ruled that the federal government has a duty of care to young people, to protect them from harm the climate crisis will inflict during their lifetimes. That decision was overturned on appeal, but today there’s an inquiry looking into how that responsibility could be enshrined in law via the parliament. It’ss been a long journey for the young woman who first brought that case against the federal Environment minister – something she did while still in high school. Today, climate activist and contributor to The Saturday Paper Anjali Sharma, on her campaign to legislate a duty of care and taking the fight to Parliament House. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Climate activist and contributor to The Saturday Paper, Anjali Sharma

Anjali Sharma on lobbying parliament from her dorm room

An Australian court once ruled that the federal government has a duty of care to young people, to protect them from harm the climate crisis will inflict during their lifetimes. That decision was overturned on appeal, but today there’s an inquiry looking into how that responsibility could be enshrined in law via the parliament. It’ss been a long journey for the young woman who first brought that case against the federal Environment minister – something she did while still in high school. Today, climate activist and contributor to The Saturday Paper Anjali Sharma, on her campaign to legislate a duty of care and taking the fight to Parliament House. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Climate activist and contributor to The Saturday Paper, Anjali Sharma

19:04

24 Mar 24

The Weekend Read: Elmo Keep on the insane spectacle of U2 at the Las Vegas sphere

On the Las Vegas strip, in a sea of casinos, sits an enormous dome that lights up the sky. It’s called The Sphere and it’s a performance venue where punters are dazzled by 54 thousand metres of LED screens capable of showing 256 million colours, in a display so overwhelming that some concertgoers faint.  Writer Elmo Keep travelled to Vegas to see her favourite band U2 play at The Sphere in their inaugurating residency. There she found in equal parts, a religious experience and a hyper capitalist nightmare.   Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Writer, Elmo Keep

The Weekend Read: Elmo Keep on the insane spectacle of U2 at the Las Vegas sphere

On the Las Vegas strip, in a sea of casinos, sits an enormous dome that lights up the sky. It’s called The Sphere and it’s a performance venue where punters are dazzled by 54 thousand metres of LED screens capable of showing 256 million colours, in a display so overwhelming that some concertgoers faint.  Writer Elmo Keep travelled to Vegas to see her favourite band U2 play at The Sphere in their inaugurating residency. There she found in equal parts, a religious experience and a hyper capitalist nightmare.   Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Writer, Elmo Keep

28:39

23 Mar 24

Dutton and Albanese share a flight and talk God

There are laws in Australia that desperately need to be overhauled and amended for the modern era.. But even with almost universal agreement that these laws need to be updated, the challenge is to get our politicians to agree on how to rewrite them. This is exactly the situation we find ourselves in on reforms to religious discrimination – which still protects religious schools' right to discriminate against LGBTQ+ students and teachers. Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno, on how today’s parliament is failing to break a decade of political gridlock. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

Dutton and Albanese share a flight and talk God

There are laws in Australia that desperately need to be overhauled and amended for the modern era.. But even with almost universal agreement that these laws need to be updated, the challenge is to get our politicians to agree on how to rewrite them. This is exactly the situation we find ourselves in on reforms to religious discrimination – which still protects religious schools' right to discriminate against LGBTQ+ students and teachers. Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno, on how today’s parliament is failing to break a decade of political gridlock. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

17:43

21 Mar 24

The ‘beige’ man behind Australia’s nuclear plan

The Coalition is going all in on nuclear power. The opposition’s vision for Australia’s future puts the technology front and centre, despite experts’ concerns about its costs, risks and impracticalities. So, is there more to it than first appears? Have the Coalition found the answers to making nuclear work in Australia? Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe, on the real reason why the Coalition is going after nuclear, and the factional warfare simmering underneath. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe

The ‘beige’ man behind Australia’s nuclear plan

The Coalition is going all in on nuclear power. The opposition’s vision for Australia’s future puts the technology front and centre, despite experts’ concerns about its costs, risks and impracticalities. So, is there more to it than first appears? Have the Coalition found the answers to making nuclear work in Australia? Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe, on the real reason why the Coalition is going after nuclear, and the factional warfare simmering underneath. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe

18:42

20 Mar 24

The Korean doomsday church targeting Australians

When starting out at university, it’s normal to want to meet new friends and establish a community.  But for some young Australians, that formative time has led them down the path of a secretive and extreme religious sect that some former members describe as exerting “mind control” and taking over their lives.  So, who’s behind this group? And how are Australians being impacted? Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper Aleisha Orr, on the story of Nathan and what he describes as a “doomsday cult” that changed his life.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper, Aleisha Orr

The Korean doomsday church targeting Australians

When starting out at university, it’s normal to want to meet new friends and establish a community.  But for some young Australians, that formative time has led them down the path of a secretive and extreme religious sect that some former members describe as exerting “mind control” and taking over their lives.  So, who’s behind this group? And how are Australians being impacted? Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper Aleisha Orr, on the story of Nathan and what he describes as a “doomsday cult” that changed his life.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper, Aleisha Orr

18:02

19 Mar 24

The women who fought to expose the gender pay gap

The gender pay gap in Australia is well documented, with data on the difference between men’s and women’s wages more detailed and comprehensive than ever. But we haven’t always been on a course for greater transparency. Almost a decade ago, the Coalition government attempted to dismantle open reporting on the gender pay gap. Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper Kristine Ziwica, on how Australia almost took its eye off the gender pay gap. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper, Kristine Ziwica

The women who fought to expose the gender pay gap

The gender pay gap in Australia is well documented, with data on the difference between men’s and women’s wages more detailed and comprehensive than ever. But we haven’t always been on a course for greater transparency. Almost a decade ago, the Coalition government attempted to dismantle open reporting on the gender pay gap. Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper Kristine Ziwica, on how Australia almost took its eye off the gender pay gap. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper, Kristine Ziwica

17:47

18 Mar 24

The truth behind Peter Dutton’s ‘strongman’ persona

Peter Dutton is a lot of things: a right-wing firebrand, a former Queensland cop and a champion of what he believes are simple Australian values. But he’s also a multi-millionaire who colleagues describe as pleasant, shy, but fiercely ambitious. Lech Blaine spent months studying Peter Dutton’s past and political ascendency to discover who the leader of the opposition really is and what’s underneath his “bad cop” exterior. Today, the author of the latest Quarterly Essay: Bad Cop, Lech Blaine, on what’s driving Peter Dutton’s strongman politics. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Author of the latest Quarterly Essay, Lech Blaine

The truth behind Peter Dutton’s ‘strongman’ persona

Peter Dutton is a lot of things: a right-wing firebrand, a former Queensland cop and a champion of what he believes are simple Australian values. But he’s also a multi-millionaire who colleagues describe as pleasant, shy, but fiercely ambitious. Lech Blaine spent months studying Peter Dutton’s past and political ascendency to discover who the leader of the opposition really is and what’s underneath his “bad cop” exterior. Today, the author of the latest Quarterly Essay: Bad Cop, Lech Blaine, on what’s driving Peter Dutton’s strongman politics. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Author of the latest Quarterly Essay, Lech Blaine

20:57

17 Mar 24

Why Coles and Woolies have politicians 'oinking'

Coles and Woolworths are in the sights of a Senate inquiry, which has been hearing evidence across Australia this week. It’s looking into whether prices are set fairly and what could be done to make them more reasonable. While that was underway, one of parliament's most colourful characters stole the show. Bob Katter has been ratcheting up a campaign of high-profile stunts to force the major parties to crackdown on supermarkets. Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno, on Bob Katter’s contradictions and how the crossbench could force the major parties to get tougher on the big two supermarkets. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

Why Coles and Woolies have politicians 'oinking'

Coles and Woolworths are in the sights of a Senate inquiry, which has been hearing evidence across Australia this week. It’s looking into whether prices are set fairly and what could be done to make them more reasonable. While that was underway, one of parliament's most colourful characters stole the show. Bob Katter has been ratcheting up a campaign of high-profile stunts to force the major parties to crackdown on supermarkets. Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno, on Bob Katter’s contradictions and how the crossbench could force the major parties to get tougher on the big two supermarkets. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

18:25

14 Mar 24

Can we believe anything the Royal Family say?

The royal family is no stranger to gossip, innuendo and controversy. But this week, the rumours and speculation over the whereabouts and health of Kate Middleton reached new, conspiratorial depths.  So, after an official photo of Kate Middleton and her children was revealed to be digitally altered – leading to more questions than answers about the princess – how broken is the trust between the public and the royal family?  Today, royal reporter Ellie Hall on the mistakes made by the Palace, and how the scandal reflects on the people next in line to be our head of state. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Royal reporter and former Buzzfeed News royal correspondent, Ellie Hall

Can we believe anything the Royal Family say?

The royal family is no stranger to gossip, innuendo and controversy. But this week, the rumours and speculation over the whereabouts and health of Kate Middleton reached new, conspiratorial depths.  So, after an official photo of Kate Middleton and her children was revealed to be digitally altered – leading to more questions than answers about the princess – how broken is the trust between the public and the royal family?  Today, royal reporter Ellie Hall on the mistakes made by the Palace, and how the scandal reflects on the people next in line to be our head of state. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Royal reporter and former Buzzfeed News royal correspondent, Ellie Hall

17:47

13 Mar 24

Inside the Zachary Rolfe hearings: The culture of racism the police deny

Zachary Rolfe, the former Northern Territory police officer who shot and killed an Indigenous teenager, Kumanjayi Walker, has been back in the witness box. Rolfe was acquitted of Walker’s murder in 2022, but now he’s given new evidence in a coronial inquest into the death.  So, what do newly revealed text messages and evidence tell us about the culture inside the Northern Territory police? And where do the problems in that policing system lay? Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper, Anna Krien, on who Zachary Rolfe is and why his evidence could spark change in the NT.   Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper, Anna Krien

Inside the Zachary Rolfe hearings: The culture of racism the police deny

Zachary Rolfe, the former Northern Territory police officer who shot and killed an Indigenous teenager, Kumanjayi Walker, has been back in the witness box. Rolfe was acquitted of Walker’s murder in 2022, but now he’s given new evidence in a coronial inquest into the death.  So, what do newly revealed text messages and evidence tell us about the culture inside the Northern Territory police? And where do the problems in that policing system lay? Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper, Anna Krien, on who Zachary Rolfe is and why his evidence could spark change in the NT.   Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper, Anna Krien

18:30

12 Mar 24

Stan Grant on Sam Kerr and the media’s failings

Stan Grant left the ABC, citing the media had failed — it had failed him and his family, and it had failed the country. Last week, he was struck by a stark reminder when the news of the charging of Sam Kerr in the UK led to an enormous amount of coverage that failed to deal with the story with grace, humanity and a real interrogation of what racism means. Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Stan Grant, on his reflections on the media since he left it and where he finds hope. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Stan Grant

Stan Grant on Sam Kerr and the media’s failings

Stan Grant left the ABC, citing the media had failed — it had failed him and his family, and it had failed the country. Last week, he was struck by a stark reminder when the news of the charging of Sam Kerr in the UK led to an enormous amount of coverage that failed to deal with the story with grace, humanity and a real interrogation of what racism means. Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Stan Grant, on his reflections on the media since he left it and where he finds hope. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Stan Grant

20:18

11 Mar 24

Why Australia is heading for a minority government

It’s in the best interests of politicians to come up with policies that appeal to voters and secure their support at the next election. So it was particularly interesting when last week, Peter Dutton announced his first policy since becoming opposition leader. It’s something experts, including former strategists for the Liberal Party, say will lose Peter Dutton votes from the exact people they should be trying to win over. Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe, on why the road map to political success is changing. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe

Why Australia is heading for a minority government

It’s in the best interests of politicians to come up with policies that appeal to voters and secure their support at the next election. So it was particularly interesting when last week, Peter Dutton announced his first policy since becoming opposition leader. It’s something experts, including former strategists for the Liberal Party, say will lose Peter Dutton votes from the exact people they should be trying to win over. Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe, on why the road map to political success is changing. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Mike Seccombe

18:36

10 Mar 24

The Weekend Read: Ange Lavoipierre on how much sex is too much for one person

Today on the show, journalist Ange Lavoipierre will be reading her piece from a recent edition of The Monthly. In the suburb of Newtown, in Sydney, two support groups almost diametrically opposed are asking essentially the same question: how much sex is too much for one person?  In one group, the Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous meeting welcomes those who are ashamed about the size of their sexual and romantic appetites. For the other, an ethical non-monogamy night allows space and discussion for those who can’t get enough.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Journalist Ange Lavoipierre

The Weekend Read: Ange Lavoipierre on how much sex is too much for one person

Today on the show, journalist Ange Lavoipierre will be reading her piece from a recent edition of The Monthly. In the suburb of Newtown, in Sydney, two support groups almost diametrically opposed are asking essentially the same question: how much sex is too much for one person?  In one group, the Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous meeting welcomes those who are ashamed about the size of their sexual and romantic appetites. For the other, an ethical non-monogamy night allows space and discussion for those who can’t get enough.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Journalist Ange Lavoipierre

18:26

9 Mar 24

The Liberals’ failed bid for suburban voters

Labor won the Dunkley byelection last weekend, but the Liberal Party spent most of the week claiming the result was a win for them as well. But even while the Liberal Party was claiming a groundswell in support, Opposition Leader Peter Dutton disappeared from public view. When Dutton emerged, he announced a reshuffle of his front bench. So, what was going on inside the Liberal Party? What message did voters send them? And is the party learning the right lessons? Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno, on the divisions appearing inside the Liberal Party. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

The Liberals’ failed bid for suburban voters

Labor won the Dunkley byelection last weekend, but the Liberal Party spent most of the week claiming the result was a win for them as well. But even while the Liberal Party was claiming a groundswell in support, Opposition Leader Peter Dutton disappeared from public view. When Dutton emerged, he announced a reshuffle of his front bench. So, what was going on inside the Liberal Party? What message did voters send them? And is the party learning the right lessons? Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno, on the divisions appearing inside the Liberal Party. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

18:37

7 Mar 24

The people pushing Australia’s gas expansion

Despite the government’s commitment to cutting emissions and reaching net zero, Australia’s gas industry is expanding – and we’re making it easier for gas companies to do their business. So, who is behind the gas lobby? Who puts the most pressure on our politicians, and are they the usual suspects? Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe, on how the gas lobby is changing and why foreign governments are taking an interest in Australia. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe.

The people pushing Australia’s gas expansion

Despite the government’s commitment to cutting emissions and reaching net zero, Australia’s gas industry is expanding – and we’re making it easier for gas companies to do their business. So, who is behind the gas lobby? Who puts the most pressure on our politicians, and are they the usual suspects? Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe, on how the gas lobby is changing and why foreign governments are taking an interest in Australia. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe.

18:06

6 Mar 24

The Australian teachers quitting over Andrew Tate

An alarming number of Australian boys are engaging with, and looking up to, the misogynistic influencer Andrew Tate. Tate’s influence is warping classroom conversation, driving female peers to the fringe of discussion and even causing some teachers to quit. So why are misogynistic influencers reaching so many young men? And how is it forcing teachers to walk away? Today, contributor to The Monthly and the author of Night Games Anna Krien on the “misogynist radicalisation” happening in our schools. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Monthly, Anna Krien Background Reading: The Tate race

The Australian teachers quitting over Andrew Tate

An alarming number of Australian boys are engaging with, and looking up to, the misogynistic influencer Andrew Tate. Tate’s influence is warping classroom conversation, driving female peers to the fringe of discussion and even causing some teachers to quit. So why are misogynistic influencers reaching so many young men? And how is it forcing teachers to walk away? Today, contributor to The Monthly and the author of Night Games Anna Krien on the “misogynist radicalisation” happening in our schools. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Monthly, Anna Krien Background Reading: The Tate race

18:22

5 Mar 24

‘Enough is enough’: a mother’s fight for justice over her son’s death in custody

Aunty Donnas Kerr has spent her life fighting for Indigenous rights.  A member of the stolen generations, she grew up seeing members of her family die in custody and marching the streets for justice.  In 2022, Aunty Donnas received a phone call about her own son, Joshua Kerr, who had died alone in a prison cell after calling out for help.  Today, the mother and sister of Joshua Kerr, Donnas and Maggie, on their family’s tragedy and why rates of Aboriginal deaths in custody aren’t getting any better. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: The mother and sister of Joshua Kerr, Donnas and Maggie

‘Enough is enough’: a mother’s fight for justice over her son’s death in custody

Aunty Donnas Kerr has spent her life fighting for Indigenous rights.  A member of the stolen generations, she grew up seeing members of her family die in custody and marching the streets for justice.  In 2022, Aunty Donnas received a phone call about her own son, Joshua Kerr, who had died alone in a prison cell after calling out for help.  Today, the mother and sister of Joshua Kerr, Donnas and Maggie, on their family’s tragedy and why rates of Aboriginal deaths in custody aren’t getting any better. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: The mother and sister of Joshua Kerr, Donnas and Maggie

21:04

4 Mar 24

The most powerful minister you’ve never heard of

A new bill that redefines Australia’s gas industry has a surprising section smuggled into the fine print. It’s designed to change not just the way we approve gas projects, but reshape the balance of power inside the Labor cabinet and take powers away from Environment Minister Tanya Plibersek. So who is behind this major shift, and what does it say about the gas lobby's influence over politics?  Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper, Royce Kurmelovs, on the most powerful minister nobody’s heard of and the further influence she may soon have. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper, Royce Kurmelovs.

The most powerful minister you’ve never heard of

A new bill that redefines Australia’s gas industry has a surprising section smuggled into the fine print. It’s designed to change not just the way we approve gas projects, but reshape the balance of power inside the Labor cabinet and take powers away from Environment Minister Tanya Plibersek. So who is behind this major shift, and what does it say about the gas lobby's influence over politics?  Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper, Royce Kurmelovs, on the most powerful minister nobody’s heard of and the further influence she may soon have. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper, Royce Kurmelovs.

16:28

3 Mar 24

Rosie Batty and a decade of public grieving

Ten years ago, Schwartz Media launched its weekly independent newspaper, The Saturday Paper. On page three of its first edition was a story about a woman who had just become a household name: Rosie Batty. Thrust into the spotlight while grieving the murder of her son Luke at the hands of his father, Rosie Batty used the worst moment of her life to put domestic violence on the national agenda. Today, associate editor of The Saturday Paper, Martin McKenzie-Murray, on what he learnt about grief after following Rosie Batty’s story for a decade.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Associate editor of The Saturday Paper, Martin McKenzie-Murray

Rosie Batty and a decade of public grieving

Ten years ago, Schwartz Media launched its weekly independent newspaper, The Saturday Paper. On page three of its first edition was a story about a woman who had just become a household name: Rosie Batty. Thrust into the spotlight while grieving the murder of her son Luke at the hands of his father, Rosie Batty used the worst moment of her life to put domestic violence on the national agenda. Today, associate editor of The Saturday Paper, Martin McKenzie-Murray, on what he learnt about grief after following Rosie Batty’s story for a decade.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Associate editor of The Saturday Paper, Martin McKenzie-Murray

21:04

29 Feb 24

Scott Morrison leaves parliament: A winner or a loser?

Scott Morrison has left the building. The former prime minister was known for his finely crafted personal image, a dad from the shire who loved rugby league.  But Morrison’s career was more notorious than that. From being the minister who forged ahead with robodebt, to proudly displaying a trophy for “stopping the boats” and famously saying he wouldn’t hold a hose during the bushfires.  So, who really was he? Today, author of The Game, Sean Kelly on Scott Morrison’s final speech, and whether he really won or lost at the game of politics. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Author of The Game, Sean Kelly

Scott Morrison leaves parliament: A winner or a loser?

Scott Morrison has left the building. The former prime minister was known for his finely crafted personal image, a dad from the shire who loved rugby league.  But Morrison’s career was more notorious than that. From being the minister who forged ahead with robodebt, to proudly displaying a trophy for “stopping the boats” and famously saying he wouldn’t hold a hose during the bushfires.  So, who really was he? Today, author of The Game, Sean Kelly on Scott Morrison’s final speech, and whether he really won or lost at the game of politics. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Author of The Game, Sean Kelly

20:04

28 Feb 24

Why Labor is being accused of pork-barrelling

Pork-barrelling isn’t illegal, but it's one of the dark arts of politics: governments spending money in seats they want to win. So, when does the practice cross the line from politicians faithfully serving the public into pork-barrelling and using taxpayer dollars to essentially bribe voters? Today, chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton on the two Labor grants that are beginning to raise questions in Canberra, and the MP who is trying to make public spending more transparent. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton

Why Labor is being accused of pork-barrelling

Pork-barrelling isn’t illegal, but it's one of the dark arts of politics: governments spending money in seats they want to win. So, when does the practice cross the line from politicians faithfully serving the public into pork-barrelling and using taxpayer dollars to essentially bribe voters? Today, chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton on the two Labor grants that are beginning to raise questions in Canberra, and the MP who is trying to make public spending more transparent. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton

18:23

27 Feb 24

Everything Peter Dutton is getting wrong on asylum seekers

Opposition Leader Peter Dutton may have found the message he’s taking to the federal election: stop the “armada of boats”. It hasn’t been high on the agenda for years, but a couple of weeks ago a boat arriving in far north Western Australia gave him an opportunity to put the issue back on the front page. Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe, fact checks Peter Dutton’s media blitz and his claims about asylum seekers. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe

Everything Peter Dutton is getting wrong on asylum seekers

Opposition Leader Peter Dutton may have found the message he’s taking to the federal election: stop the “armada of boats”. It hasn’t been high on the agenda for years, but a couple of weeks ago a boat arriving in far north Western Australia gave him an opportunity to put the issue back on the front page. Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe, fact checks Peter Dutton’s media blitz and his claims about asylum seekers. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: National correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe

18:46

26 Feb 24

‘They don't know much’: Politicians spending on the military

Australia has spent almost 15 years trying to buy new surface ships for the navy, but they are still yet to arrive. That’s because governments have repeatedly thrown out the old plan to introduce their own. Last week, the Albanese government was the latest to reveal their plans for the future of the navy’s surface fleet. So, will it work? Today, emeritus professor of strategic studies at the Australian National University and contributor to The Saturday Paper Hugh White, on Labor’s navy overhaul and whether it’s an expensive grab for votes.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Emeritus professor of strategic studies at the Australian National University and contributor to The Saturday Paper, Hugh White

‘They don't know much’: Politicians spending on the military

Australia has spent almost 15 years trying to buy new surface ships for the navy, but they are still yet to arrive. That’s because governments have repeatedly thrown out the old plan to introduce their own. Last week, the Albanese government was the latest to reveal their plans for the future of the navy’s surface fleet. So, will it work? Today, emeritus professor of strategic studies at the Australian National University and contributor to The Saturday Paper Hugh White, on Labor’s navy overhaul and whether it’s an expensive grab for votes.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Emeritus professor of strategic studies at the Australian National University and contributor to The Saturday Paper, Hugh White

18:39

25 Feb 24

The Weekend Read: Jane Gleeson on why we need decay to save the planet

Today on the show, writer Jane Gleeson-White, with her piece from a recent edition of The Monthly. In inner-city Sydney, the heart of the urban jungle, Jane meets environmental lawyer turned activist, Michael Mobbs.  His ambition is to transform the concrete warren of terraces and narrow streets of Chippendale into a sustainable oasis.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Author, Jane Gleeson-White

The Weekend Read: Jane Gleeson on why we need decay to save the planet

Today on the show, writer Jane Gleeson-White, with her piece from a recent edition of The Monthly. In inner-city Sydney, the heart of the urban jungle, Jane meets environmental lawyer turned activist, Michael Mobbs.  His ambition is to transform the concrete warren of terraces and narrow streets of Chippendale into a sustainable oasis.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Author, Jane Gleeson-White

17:07

24 Feb 24

The two days that could decide Julian Assange's freedom

Julian Assange has spent years fighting to prevent his extradition to the United States and this week, the battle has come down to just two days in court, when his lawyers made what could be their final stand. The British High Court now holds his fate in its hands, as it considers his request for an appeal. So, while supporters anxiously await the judges’ ruling, what lies ahead for Julian Assange?  Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper Amy Fallon, on what the court heard and how mounting public and political support is helping the Australian’s cause. You can read Amy’s report on the latest from Julian Assange’s appeal in this weekend’s edition of The Saturday Paper. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper Amy Fallon

The two days that could decide Julian Assange's freedom

Julian Assange has spent years fighting to prevent his extradition to the United States and this week, the battle has come down to just two days in court, when his lawyers made what could be their final stand. The British High Court now holds his fate in its hands, as it considers his request for an appeal. So, while supporters anxiously await the judges’ ruling, what lies ahead for Julian Assange?  Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper Amy Fallon, on what the court heard and how mounting public and political support is helping the Australian’s cause. You can read Amy’s report on the latest from Julian Assange’s appeal in this weekend’s edition of The Saturday Paper. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper Amy Fallon

19:28

22 Feb 24

Jon Ronson on who really started the culture wars

Jon Ronson has spent time with conspiracy theorist Alex Jones, uncovered the secret US military program to train psychic soldiers and told the stories of the first people to be publicly shamed in the age of social media. Now, Ronson’s investigating the culture wars. From fears about left-wing activists taking over the streets to paranoia about vaccines – he charts the surprising origins of our most divisive social conflicts. Today, author of The Psychopath Test and So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed, Jon Ronson, on the very human stories behind how things fell apart. See Jon Ronson live in Australia in November: https://www.fane.co.uk/jon-ronson Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Author of The Psychopath Test and host of Things Fell Apart, Jon Ronson

Jon Ronson on who really started the culture wars

Jon Ronson has spent time with conspiracy theorist Alex Jones, uncovered the secret US military program to train psychic soldiers and told the stories of the first people to be publicly shamed in the age of social media. Now, Ronson’s investigating the culture wars. From fears about left-wing activists taking over the streets to paranoia about vaccines – he charts the surprising origins of our most divisive social conflicts. Today, author of The Psychopath Test and So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed, Jon Ronson, on the very human stories behind how things fell apart. See Jon Ronson live in Australia in November: https://www.fane.co.uk/jon-ronson Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Author of The Psychopath Test and host of Things Fell Apart, Jon Ronson

20:56

21 Feb 24

A missing $80 million to keep asylum seekers in limbo

After asylum seekers arrived by boat in Western Australia last week and were sent to Nauru, old debates about offshore immigration detention have been reanimated.  It comes as the government has admitted they aren’t able to account for $80 million paid to Papua New Guinea for the welfare and support of people formerly held in offshore detention. So, how did millions of taxpayer dollars disappear? And what does it mean for the asylum seekers who have nowhere else to go?  Today, chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton, on Australia’s management of offshore detention.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton

A missing $80 million to keep asylum seekers in limbo

After asylum seekers arrived by boat in Western Australia last week and were sent to Nauru, old debates about offshore immigration detention have been reanimated.  It comes as the government has admitted they aren’t able to account for $80 million paid to Papua New Guinea for the welfare and support of people formerly held in offshore detention. So, how did millions of taxpayer dollars disappear? And what does it mean for the asylum seekers who have nowhere else to go?  Today, chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton, on Australia’s management of offshore detention.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton

18:34

20 Feb 24

Why the Bureau of Meteorology lied to court

The Bureau of Meteorology determines a lot: from whether we bring an umbrella to work, to how much warning we get of a natural disaster – all the way to what we know about climate change.  But now, serious questions are being raised about the bureau’s management – and it’s emerged that senior executives deliberately misled a federal court. So, why did they lie?  Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton on troubles at the BoM, and how internal struggles are getting in the way of the weather forecast. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton

Why the Bureau of Meteorology lied to court

The Bureau of Meteorology determines a lot: from whether we bring an umbrella to work, to how much warning we get of a natural disaster – all the way to what we know about climate change.  But now, serious questions are being raised about the bureau’s management – and it’s emerged that senior executives deliberately misled a federal court. So, why did they lie?  Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton on troubles at the BoM, and how internal struggles are getting in the way of the weather forecast. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton

17:54

19 Feb 24

Texts, calls and a Brisbane lunch: Murdoch press and the Bruce Lehrmann inquiry

It was three years ago last week that Brittany Higgins made allegations that rocked Australia. Those allegations resulted in a mistrial, and while Bruce Lehrmann strenuously maintained his innocence, many questions were raised about the handling of Higgins’ claims.  So, an inquiry was launched, to see if lessons could be learned to improve the justice system. But last week, we learned more about how the very inquiry meant to fix things turned into a media circus of its own. Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper Chris Wallace on the texts and phone calls between the head of the inquiry and a well-known journalist. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper Chris Wallace

Texts, calls and a Brisbane lunch: Murdoch press and the Bruce Lehrmann inquiry

It was three years ago last week that Brittany Higgins made allegations that rocked Australia. Those allegations resulted in a mistrial, and while Bruce Lehrmann strenuously maintained his innocence, many questions were raised about the handling of Higgins’ claims.  So, an inquiry was launched, to see if lessons could be learned to improve the justice system. But last week, we learned more about how the very inquiry meant to fix things turned into a media circus of its own. Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper Chris Wallace on the texts and phone calls between the head of the inquiry and a well-known journalist. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper Chris Wallace

14:35

18 Feb 24

Can Labor be forced to end negative gearing?

Following its loss at the 2019 federal election, touching negative gearing — tax concessions that benefit property investors — has been unthinkable for the Labor Party. But this week the government was drawn into discussions about ending it by The Greens’ housing spokesperson, Max Chandler-Mather, demanding Anthony Albanese address it if he wants to pass a new housing policy. So, could the Greens force Labor to tackle negative gearing?  Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on the future of housing and why unproductive parliamentary Question Time debates might have to change. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

Can Labor be forced to end negative gearing?

Following its loss at the 2019 federal election, touching negative gearing — tax concessions that benefit property investors — has been unthinkable for the Labor Party. But this week the government was drawn into discussions about ending it by The Greens’ housing spokesperson, Max Chandler-Mather, demanding Anthony Albanese address it if he wants to pass a new housing policy. So, could the Greens force Labor to tackle negative gearing?  Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on the future of housing and why unproductive parliamentary Question Time debates might have to change. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

18:37

15 Feb 24

The Taylor Swift conspiracy: The world’s biggest popstar and the US election

While Taylor Swift arrives in Australia for the biggest shows of her career, she’s found herself at the centre of conspiratorial fantasies sweeping American right-wing politics. Some view her relationship with American football star Travis Kelce — a love story that sounds like an American fairytale — as evidence for a nefarious scheme to re-elect President Joe Biden. So, how did a baseless theory capture America to the point that the president himself has responded?  Today, political reporter for Rolling Stone magazine, Nikki McCann-Ramirez, on how right-wing conspiracies are rotting American politics. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Political reporter for Rolling Stone magazine, Nikki McCann-Ramirez

The Taylor Swift conspiracy: The world’s biggest popstar and the US election

While Taylor Swift arrives in Australia for the biggest shows of her career, she’s found herself at the centre of conspiratorial fantasies sweeping American right-wing politics. Some view her relationship with American football star Travis Kelce — a love story that sounds like an American fairytale — as evidence for a nefarious scheme to re-elect President Joe Biden. So, how did a baseless theory capture America to the point that the president himself has responded?  Today, political reporter for Rolling Stone magazine, Nikki McCann-Ramirez, on how right-wing conspiracies are rotting American politics. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Political reporter for Rolling Stone magazine, Nikki McCann-Ramirez

19:25

14 Feb 24

Jane Caro on Labor's school funding deal

While some private schools in Australia fret over the construction of their new waterpolo centres or drama theatres, public schools face more pressing challenges, like whether there’s a hole in the roof or enough books for every student.  School funding arrangements across the country are now the concern of Jason Clare, the federal education minister who went to public schools himself. So, how did inequities between public and private get so bad? And could a review commissioned by Jason Clare fix it?  Today, public education advocate and contributor to The Saturday Paper Jane Caro on how Australia needs to fund public schools – and why we’re still not doing it. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Public education advocate and contributor to The Saturday Paper, Jane Caro

Jane Caro on Labor's school funding deal

While some private schools in Australia fret over the construction of their new waterpolo centres or drama theatres, public schools face more pressing challenges, like whether there’s a hole in the roof or enough books for every student.  School funding arrangements across the country are now the concern of Jason Clare, the federal education minister who went to public schools himself. So, how did inequities between public and private get so bad? And could a review commissioned by Jason Clare fix it?  Today, public education advocate and contributor to The Saturday Paper Jane Caro on how Australia needs to fund public schools – and why we’re still not doing it. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Public education advocate and contributor to The Saturday Paper, Jane Caro

17:07

13 Feb 24

Why Peter Dutton believes he can win

Since becoming opposition leader, Peter Dutton has clawed back in the polls by relentlessly attacking the Labor government – now that approach is being tested. During the first major political battle of the year, over the stage three tax cuts, Peter Dutton’s instincts to fiercely attack the government didn’t seem to work as planned and resulted in the Coalition facing unwanted scrutiny when they eventually backed the changes. So, what is Peter Dutton’s strategy? Can he marry his instincts for a political fight with electability as a potential prime minister? Today, chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton, on how Peter Dutton plans to win the next election. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton

Why Peter Dutton believes he can win

Since becoming opposition leader, Peter Dutton has clawed back in the polls by relentlessly attacking the Labor government – now that approach is being tested. During the first major political battle of the year, over the stage three tax cuts, Peter Dutton’s instincts to fiercely attack the government didn’t seem to work as planned and resulted in the Coalition facing unwanted scrutiny when they eventually backed the changes. So, what is Peter Dutton’s strategy? Can he marry his instincts for a political fight with electability as a potential prime minister? Today, chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton, on how Peter Dutton plans to win the next election. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton

20:17

12 Feb 24

The teals' plan to shock the major parties

The teals of the 2022 election outdid expectations – flipping six historically Liberal seats independent.  It’s a result that has energised their backers, Climate 200, who are now looking well beyond wealthy, inner-city electorates for their next wins.  So, can they repeat their success in regional seats and shock the major parties again in 2025? Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton, on how Queensland could be the next battleground for the climate 200-backed independents. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton

The teals' plan to shock the major parties

The teals of the 2022 election outdid expectations – flipping six historically Liberal seats independent.  It’s a result that has energised their backers, Climate 200, who are now looking well beyond wealthy, inner-city electorates for their next wins.  So, can they repeat their success in regional seats and shock the major parties again in 2025? Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton, on how Queensland could be the next battleground for the climate 200-backed independents. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton

18:16

11 Feb 24

The Weekend Read: Konrad Muller on organic wine and whether it’s worth it

Today, writer Konrad Muller reads his latest piece on the quest to learn whether making organic wine is worth the effort. It's called “Notes from a small vineyard” and in it he tries to discover the true effort and cost of going organic and interrogates what difference it makes. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Writer, Konrad Muller Background reading: Notes from a small vineyard

The Weekend Read: Konrad Muller on organic wine and whether it’s worth it

Today, writer Konrad Muller reads his latest piece on the quest to learn whether making organic wine is worth the effort. It's called “Notes from a small vineyard” and in it he tries to discover the true effort and cost of going organic and interrogates what difference it makes. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Writer, Konrad Muller Background reading: Notes from a small vineyard

15:01

10 Feb 24

You can ignore your boss after work. It’s now the law.

The right to disconnect will become law, after an agreement was reached between the government, the Greens and independents. The law will help change our relationship to work and will perhaps allow us to finally log off. But it’s only one part of a massive new batch of workplace reform that is being passed into law. Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno, on the changes to rights in the workplace and the politicking that brought the deal together. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

You can ignore your boss after work. It’s now the law.

The right to disconnect will become law, after an agreement was reached between the government, the Greens and independents. The law will help change our relationship to work and will perhaps allow us to finally log off. But it’s only one part of a massive new batch of workplace reform that is being passed into law. Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno, on the changes to rights in the workplace and the politicking that brought the deal together. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

19:05

8 Feb 24

Is this a new era for the Reserve Bank?

For decades the Reserve Bank has done things the same old way: announcing their decision on interest rates the first Tuesday of every month, with just a short statement. But the RBA’s first decision of the year marked a new era of transparency. After announcing an interest rate pause this week, governor Michele Bullock hosted a candid press conference where the board’s decision was finally allowed to be questioned. Today, managing editor of The Saturday Paper, Emily Barrett, on whether the changes to the RBA will make a difference to everyday Australians. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Managing Editor for The Saturday Paper, Emily Barrett.

Is this a new era for the Reserve Bank?

For decades the Reserve Bank has done things the same old way: announcing their decision on interest rates the first Tuesday of every month, with just a short statement. But the RBA’s first decision of the year marked a new era of transparency. After announcing an interest rate pause this week, governor Michele Bullock hosted a candid press conference where the board’s decision was finally allowed to be questioned. Today, managing editor of The Saturday Paper, Emily Barrett, on whether the changes to the RBA will make a difference to everyday Australians. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Managing Editor for The Saturday Paper, Emily Barrett.

18:25

7 Feb 24

‘Every system failed’: Inside Tasmania’s abuse cover-up

Nick Feik spent eight months looking into one of the worst institutional failures to protect children from sexual abuse this country has ever seen… It took him to the Tasmanian town of Deloraine and to Ashley Youth Detention Centre – where he found a culture of violence, child sexual abuse, cover-ups, blame-shifting and a system incapable of rooting out abusers.  Today, contributor to The Monthly Nick Feik, on the child sexual abuse scandal that should be a national priority.  If you or anyone you know needs mental health support, you can call Lifeline on 13 11 14. For support related to child sexual abuse, you can call Bravehearts on 1800 272 831. Children and young people up to 25 can seek help via the Kids Helpline on 1800 55 1800. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Monthly, Nick Feik Background Reading: The rotten core

‘Every system failed’: Inside Tasmania’s abuse cover-up

Nick Feik spent eight months looking into one of the worst institutional failures to protect children from sexual abuse this country has ever seen… It took him to the Tasmanian town of Deloraine and to Ashley Youth Detention Centre – where he found a culture of violence, child sexual abuse, cover-ups, blame-shifting and a system incapable of rooting out abusers.  Today, contributor to The Monthly Nick Feik, on the child sexual abuse scandal that should be a national priority.  If you or anyone you know needs mental health support, you can call Lifeline on 13 11 14. For support related to child sexual abuse, you can call Bravehearts on 1800 272 831. Children and young people up to 25 can seek help via the Kids Helpline on 1800 55 1800. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Monthly, Nick Feik Background Reading: The rotten core

20:33

6 Feb 24

Why the Newington old boys are crying

Videos of emotional protesters outside a private all-boys school in Sydney have gone viral, with some former students of Newington College opposing the school welcoming female enrolment. The topic of single-sex schooling is familiar to Chanel Contos – a consent advocate who has for years accused private boys schools of fostering a dangerous and toxic culture.  Today, founder of Teach Us Consent and author of Consent Laid Bare, Chanel Contos, on the argument against all-boys schools and the structures of power and privilege they uphold.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Founder of Teach Us Consent and author of Consent Laid Bare, Chanel Contos

Why the Newington old boys are crying

Videos of emotional protesters outside a private all-boys school in Sydney have gone viral, with some former students of Newington College opposing the school welcoming female enrolment. The topic of single-sex schooling is familiar to Chanel Contos – a consent advocate who has for years accused private boys schools of fostering a dangerous and toxic culture.  Today, founder of Teach Us Consent and author of Consent Laid Bare, Chanel Contos, on the argument against all-boys schools and the structures of power and privilege they uphold.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Founder of Teach Us Consent and author of Consent Laid Bare, Chanel Contos

19:39

5 Feb 24

Inside the Albanese reset

For someone who’s been accused of breaking an election promise, Anthony Albanese isn’t hiding. The prime minister and his front bench have been out selling their new tax cuts, giving interviews and addressing the National Press Club. So what makes the government confident they’ve made the right call? And how does it set up the political chessboard for the first week of parliament? Today, chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton on Anthony Albanese’s biggest call and how he made it. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton

Inside the Albanese reset

For someone who’s been accused of breaking an election promise, Anthony Albanese isn’t hiding. The prime minister and his front bench have been out selling their new tax cuts, giving interviews and addressing the National Press Club. So what makes the government confident they’ve made the right call? And how does it set up the political chessboard for the first week of parliament? Today, chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Middleton on Anthony Albanese’s biggest call and how he made it. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper, Karen Middleton

18:35

4 Feb 24

Is 2024 democracy's biggest test?

2024 will be democracy’s biggest year.  Over four billion people will head to the polls, with major battles in the United States, India, South Africa and Indonesia. One person watching this closely is Anne Applebaum. She was calling out authoritarianism spreading around the world while western leaders were still shaking hands with Vladimir Putin.  So, where could the world’s politics be heading?  Today, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and writer for The Atlantic Anne Applebaum, on democracy’s biggest test and how it can survive. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and writer for The Atlantic, Anne Applebaum

Is 2024 democracy's biggest test?

2024 will be democracy’s biggest year.  Over four billion people will head to the polls, with major battles in the United States, India, South Africa and Indonesia. One person watching this closely is Anne Applebaum. She was calling out authoritarianism spreading around the world while western leaders were still shaking hands with Vladimir Putin.  So, where could the world’s politics be heading?  Today, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and writer for The Atlantic Anne Applebaum, on democracy’s biggest test and how it can survive. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and writer for The Atlantic, Anne Applebaum

18:32

1 Feb 24

Is the ABC’s reputation in trouble?

The ABC has started the year fighting off accusations of racism, unlawful dismissal and a failure to protect journalists from outside attacks.  The case of Antoniette Lattouf’s sacking, a description which the ABC denies, has ignited a debate about the broadcaster’s editorial policies, its coverage of the war in the Middle East and its vulnerability to external lobbying and pressure.  So, are the policies, the reporters, or the leaders to blame for the ABC’s problems? Today, associate editor of The Saturday Paper Martin McKenzie-Murray, on the generational divide emerging at the national broadcaster.     Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Associate editor of The Saturday Paper, Martin McKenzie-Murray

Is the ABC’s reputation in trouble?

The ABC has started the year fighting off accusations of racism, unlawful dismissal and a failure to protect journalists from outside attacks.  The case of Antoniette Lattouf’s sacking, a description which the ABC denies, has ignited a debate about the broadcaster’s editorial policies, its coverage of the war in the Middle East and its vulnerability to external lobbying and pressure.  So, are the policies, the reporters, or the leaders to blame for the ABC’s problems? Today, associate editor of The Saturday Paper Martin McKenzie-Murray, on the generational divide emerging at the national broadcaster.     Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Associate editor of The Saturday Paper, Martin McKenzie-Murray

19:27

31 Jan 24

What did the ICJ's ruling really mean?

Last weekend’s decision by the International Court of Justice was heralded as a victory by many. South Africa and the Palestinian Authority saw it as a vindication, as orders have been made to prevent any genocidal acts in Gaza and the ICJ will move towards a full trial. Others heralded it as a win for Israel, with the court refusing to make an order for the end of military action against Hamas. Today, expert in international law and Professor of Law at the University of California Davis Chimene Keitner, on what the ICJ really considered and what their interim decision means. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Expert in international law and Professor of Law at the University of California Davis Chimene Keitner

What did the ICJ's ruling really mean?

Last weekend’s decision by the International Court of Justice was heralded as a victory by many. South Africa and the Palestinian Authority saw it as a vindication, as orders have been made to prevent any genocidal acts in Gaza and the ICJ will move towards a full trial. Others heralded it as a win for Israel, with the court refusing to make an order for the end of military action against Hamas. Today, expert in international law and Professor of Law at the University of California Davis Chimene Keitner, on what the ICJ really considered and what their interim decision means. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Expert in international law and Professor of Law at the University of California Davis Chimene Keitner

22:30

30 Jan 24

The Dreyfus interview: The Attorney-General's vision for ‘honest government’

The Labor government promised it would return transparency to government once elected at the 2022 election. More than anyone else that mission was given to the new first law officer of Australia: Attorney-General Mark Dreyfus. So how has he measured up to Labor’s promise? Today, Attorney-General Mark Dreyfus, on his essay in the new edition of The Monthly and his vision of a more honest Australian government. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Attorney-General, Mark Dreyfus.

The Dreyfus interview: The Attorney-General's vision for ‘honest government’

The Labor government promised it would return transparency to government once elected at the 2022 election. More than anyone else that mission was given to the new first law officer of Australia: Attorney-General Mark Dreyfus. So how has he measured up to Labor’s promise? Today, Attorney-General Mark Dreyfus, on his essay in the new edition of The Monthly and his vision of a more honest Australian government. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Attorney-General, Mark Dreyfus.

22:09

29 Jan 24

Why Albanese changed his mind on tax cuts

The stage three tax cuts the Labor government said they’d deliver will be altered and now be of greater benefit to lower and middle-income earners. What does the change mean for all of us? Is there such a thing as a good promise to break? And does this decision signal that Anthony Albanese is taking a new approach to being prime minister? Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno, on what to make of the big changes coming to our pay packets. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

Why Albanese changed his mind on tax cuts

The stage three tax cuts the Labor government said they’d deliver will be altered and now be of greater benefit to lower and middle-income earners. What does the change mean for all of us? Is there such a thing as a good promise to break? And does this decision signal that Anthony Albanese is taking a new approach to being prime minister? Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno, on what to make of the big changes coming to our pay packets. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Columnist for The Saturday Paper, Paul Bongiorno.

18:10

28 Jan 24

The Weekend Read: Anthony Ham on what happens when a mine is meant to be rehabilitated

Surrounded by what we know as the Kakadu National Park, the Northern Territory’s Ranger Uranium Mine finally ceased processing in 2021, after nearly 50 years of operation.  With the mine now closed, Kakadu’s traditional owners are seeking that the government make good on the original promise of a national park in their care. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Writer and photographer Anthony Ham

The Weekend Read: Anthony Ham on what happens when a mine is meant to be rehabilitated

Surrounded by what we know as the Kakadu National Park, the Northern Territory’s Ranger Uranium Mine finally ceased processing in 2021, after nearly 50 years of operation.  With the mine now closed, Kakadu’s traditional owners are seeking that the government make good on the original promise of a national park in their care. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Writer and photographer Anthony Ham

26:34

27 Jan 24

Peter Dutton’s failing culture war over Jan 26

This year, the attempt to whip up nationalism over January 26 has taken a different turn. While politicians and the media talk about pride in celebrating Australia Day, many businesses and cultural institutions are moving ahead with not recognising a holiday that celebrates colonisation. So is the culture war actually failing? Is the debate over? And in the shadow of the referendum defeat, what is the state of the push for justice for Indigenous Australians? Today, writer and host of The Mission on 3RRR radio Daniel James, on what this year’s debate about January 26 tells us about the direction of the country. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Writer and host of The Mission on RRR radio Daniel James

Peter Dutton’s failing culture war over Jan 26

This year, the attempt to whip up nationalism over January 26 has taken a different turn. While politicians and the media talk about pride in celebrating Australia Day, many businesses and cultural institutions are moving ahead with not recognising a holiday that celebrates colonisation. So is the culture war actually failing? Is the debate over? And in the shadow of the referendum defeat, what is the state of the push for justice for Indigenous Australians? Today, writer and host of The Mission on 3RRR radio Daniel James, on what this year’s debate about January 26 tells us about the direction of the country. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Writer and host of The Mission on RRR radio Daniel James

17:24

25 Jan 24

Is Australia lagging on AI?

All over the world, humanity is rushing to regulate the development of artificial intelligence. Now, the Australian government has announced its first steps toward controlling the development of AI. But is it already too late? And do we really understand what the risks are? The technology is advancing at such a fast pace that some examples are becoming indistinguishable from real life. Today, Professor Toby Walsh, author of Faking It, on whether Australia is going far enough to regulate AI and the consequences of getting it wrong. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Author of Faking It, Professor Toby Walsh

Is Australia lagging on AI?

All over the world, humanity is rushing to regulate the development of artificial intelligence. Now, the Australian government has announced its first steps toward controlling the development of AI. But is it already too late? And do we really understand what the risks are? The technology is advancing at such a fast pace that some examples are becoming indistinguishable from real life. Today, Professor Toby Walsh, author of Faking It, on whether Australia is going far enough to regulate AI and the consequences of getting it wrong. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Author of Faking It, Professor Toby Walsh

18:31

24 Jan 24

Julian Assange’s brother on his last shot at freedom

For years, Gabriel Shipton has been desperately advocating for the release of his older brother, Julian Assange.  It’s a fight that may have nearly reached its end. Next month, Julian Assange has one final chance, to request an appeal of his extradition to the United States. If it fails, medical experts insist Assange will take his own life.  Today, Gabriel Shipton on his brother’s last shot at freedom.  Warning: this episode discusses suicide. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Filmmaker and brother of Julian Assange, Gabriel Shipton

Julian Assange’s brother on his last shot at freedom

For years, Gabriel Shipton has been desperately advocating for the release of his older brother, Julian Assange.  It’s a fight that may have nearly reached its end. Next month, Julian Assange has one final chance, to request an appeal of his extradition to the United States. If it fails, medical experts insist Assange will take his own life.  Today, Gabriel Shipton on his brother’s last shot at freedom.  Warning: this episode discusses suicide. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Filmmaker and brother of Julian Assange, Gabriel Shipton

19:18

23 Jan 24

Why judges will soon get to decide ‘Australian values’

At the end of last year, the government rushed through new laws that have largely flown under the radar.  The new citizenship act, which was passed following a High Court decision, allows judges to strip a dual citizen of their Australian citizenship if they repudiate ‘Australian values’.  But, what are Australian values? And can they be defined, anyway? Today, constitutional and citizenship expert and contributor to The Saturday Paper Professor Kim Rubenstein on why a new set of laws are forcing us to reckon with what it means to be Australian. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Constitutional and citizenship expert and contributor to The Saturday Paper, Professor Kim Rubenstein

Why judges will soon get to decide ‘Australian values’

At the end of last year, the government rushed through new laws that have largely flown under the radar.  The new citizenship act, which was passed following a High Court decision, allows judges to strip a dual citizen of their Australian citizenship if they repudiate ‘Australian values’.  But, what are Australian values? And can they be defined, anyway? Today, constitutional and citizenship expert and contributor to The Saturday Paper Professor Kim Rubenstein on why a new set of laws are forcing us to reckon with what it means to be Australian. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Constitutional and citizenship expert and contributor to The Saturday Paper, Professor Kim Rubenstein

19:50

22 Jan 24

Why time’s up for Coles and Woolies

Supermarket prices have finally caught the attention of our leaders. While the cost of living crisis continues, customers and, now, politicians are becoming increasingly fed up with the price of groceries, while Woolworths and Coles rake in billions of dollars in profits. So, what can be done about it? And will government scrutiny be enough to fix an industry dominated by two powerful players? Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton on how 2024 could be a year of reckoning for Coles and Woolies. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton.

Why time’s up for Coles and Woolies

Supermarket prices have finally caught the attention of our leaders. While the cost of living crisis continues, customers and, now, politicians are becoming increasingly fed up with the price of groceries, while Woolworths and Coles rake in billions of dollars in profits. So, what can be done about it? And will government scrutiny be enough to fix an industry dominated by two powerful players? Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton on how 2024 could be a year of reckoning for Coles and Woolies. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton.

17:49

21 Jan 24

The ‘elephant in the room’ at the Australian Open

Professional sport has grappled with how to address athletes’ domestic violence and sexual assault allegations for years. It’s an issue that’s currently unfolding before viewers worldwide, who are tuning into the Australian Open in Melbourne. Tennis star Alexander Zverev is playing at the tournament while facing domestic violence allegations and an impending trial in Germany. Today, sports journalist and author of new biography Naomi Osaka, Ben Rothenberg, sheds light on the culture of silence around domestic violence in tennis. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Sports journalist and author of new biography Naomi Osaka, Ben Rothenberg.

The ‘elephant in the room’ at the Australian Open

Professional sport has grappled with how to address athletes’ domestic violence and sexual assault allegations for years. It’s an issue that’s currently unfolding before viewers worldwide, who are tuning into the Australian Open in Melbourne. Tennis star Alexander Zverev is playing at the tournament while facing domestic violence allegations and an impending trial in Germany. Today, sports journalist and author of new biography Naomi Osaka, Ben Rothenberg, sheds light on the culture of silence around domestic violence in tennis. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Sports journalist and author of new biography Naomi Osaka, Ben Rothenberg.

18:29

18 Jan 24

Why America is willing to re-elect Trump

Donald Trump has passed the first electoral test of his ambitious campaign to return to the White House. The former president convincingly won the Republican caucus in Iowa, asserting his stronghold over the party, less than four years after losing the presidential election to Joe Biden. Trump is now likely to become the Republican presidential nominee. So, what does his victory say about America? Today, senior researcher at the Australia Institute Dr Emma Shortis on the risks of Trump’s enduring popularity in the United States.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior researcher at the Australia Institute, Dr Emma Shortis

Why America is willing to re-elect Trump

Donald Trump has passed the first electoral test of his ambitious campaign to return to the White House. The former president convincingly won the Republican caucus in Iowa, asserting his stronghold over the party, less than four years after losing the presidential election to Joe Biden. Trump is now likely to become the Republican presidential nominee. So, what does his victory say about America? Today, senior researcher at the Australia Institute Dr Emma Shortis on the risks of Trump’s enduring popularity in the United States.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior researcher at the Australia Institute, Dr Emma Shortis

19:13

17 Jan 24

The chaos at the ABC

The ABC is facing mounting scrutiny over the sacking of radio presenter Antoinette Lattouf, just days into a short-term contract. In a Fair Work case against the ABC, Lattouf alleges she was dismissed over a pro-Palestine social media post, as well as claiming systemic racial discrimination within the organisation against people of Arab or Muslim backgrounds. Meanwhile, the public broadcaster is dealing with the resignation of other high-profile presenters and scores of redundancies amid a restructure that is causing tension among staff over the ABC’s broader direction. So, what’s going on at Aunty? Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper and editor of 7am Scott Mitchell explores the deeper problems and frustrations at the ABC. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper and editor of 7am, Scott Mitchell.

The chaos at the ABC

The ABC is facing mounting scrutiny over the sacking of radio presenter Antoinette Lattouf, just days into a short-term contract. In a Fair Work case against the ABC, Lattouf alleges she was dismissed over a pro-Palestine social media post, as well as claiming systemic racial discrimination within the organisation against people of Arab or Muslim backgrounds. Meanwhile, the public broadcaster is dealing with the resignation of other high-profile presenters and scores of redundancies amid a restructure that is causing tension among staff over the ABC’s broader direction. So, what’s going on at Aunty? Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper and editor of 7am Scott Mitchell explores the deeper problems and frustrations at the ABC. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper and editor of 7am, Scott Mitchell.

18:37

16 Jan 24

A major hospital in strife

The catholic church is known for running schools and charity services in Australia, but it also operates more than 20 publicly funded hospitals.  It’s an arrangement that helped bring healthcare to the public before Australia was even federated, but it often goes unnoticed by patients.  So, what happens when a hospital run by a catholic body gets into major financial strife? Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton, on how an iconic public hospital may soon run out of money.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton.

A major hospital in strife

The catholic church is known for running schools and charity services in Australia, but it also operates more than 20 publicly funded hospitals.  It’s an arrangement that helped bring healthcare to the public before Australia was even federated, but it often goes unnoticed by patients.  So, what happens when a hospital run by a catholic body gets into major financial strife? Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton, on how an iconic public hospital may soon run out of money.  Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Senior reporter for The Saturday Paper, Rick Morton.

18:11

15 Jan 24

What will happen if the Israel–Hamas war lasts for all of 2024?

Israel’s war against Hamas in Gaza now seems like it will last even longer, with the Israeli military saying it is prepared for a long conflict – one that could last all year. But the longer the war continues, the more devastating the humanitarian situation in Gaza becomes, and the higher the chance of more war breaking out across the region. Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper and Middle East correspondent for The Economist Gregg Carlstrom on the efforts to limit the conflict – and why so far it’s been failing. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper and Middle East correspondent for The Economist, Gregg Carlstrom

What will happen if the Israel–Hamas war lasts for all of 2024?

Israel’s war against Hamas in Gaza now seems like it will last even longer, with the Israeli military saying it is prepared for a long conflict – one that could last all year. But the longer the war continues, the more devastating the humanitarian situation in Gaza becomes, and the higher the chance of more war breaking out across the region. Today, contributor to The Saturday Paper and Middle East correspondent for The Economist Gregg Carlstrom on the efforts to limit the conflict – and why so far it’s been failing. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Contributor to The Saturday Paper and Middle East correspondent for The Economist, Gregg Carlstrom

18:41

14 Jan 24

The Summer Read: New nipples with tattoo ink

A clinic inside Melbourne’s Royal Women’s Hospital is quietly changing lives through the power of tattoos.  The Combined Breast Service offers breast reconstruction, including making nipples anew with tattoo ink. It’s an offering that empowers post-mastectomy patients and breast cancer survivors, who often grapple with accepting their new chests.  Today, author Katherine Wilson will be reading her piece from the May issue of The Monthly. (This episode first aired in August 2023) Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Author Katherine Wilson

The Summer Read: New nipples with tattoo ink

A clinic inside Melbourne’s Royal Women’s Hospital is quietly changing lives through the power of tattoos.  The Combined Breast Service offers breast reconstruction, including making nipples anew with tattoo ink. It’s an offering that empowers post-mastectomy patients and breast cancer survivors, who often grapple with accepting their new chests.  Today, author Katherine Wilson will be reading her piece from the May issue of The Monthly. (This episode first aired in August 2023) Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Author Katherine Wilson

21:20

11 Jan 24

The Summer Read: Richard King on how ChatGPT is changing how knowledge is shared

Today on the show, writer Richard King, with his piece ‘Machine Learning’ about the AI chatbot ChatGPT. He begins his story with discourse sweeping a university campus as AI reaches the hands of ordinary students and teachers. How will this technology – still only a few months old – change not only teaching and marking, but the very nature of the transfer of knowledge? This is the question he sets out to answer, and it’s a compelling one as we stand on the precipice of a new age of technology. Richard will read his story from the latest edition of The Monthly after a short conversation. (This episode first aired in April 2023) Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Writer Richard King.

The Summer Read: Richard King on how ChatGPT is changing how knowledge is shared

Today on the show, writer Richard King, with his piece ‘Machine Learning’ about the AI chatbot ChatGPT. He begins his story with discourse sweeping a university campus as AI reaches the hands of ordinary students and teachers. How will this technology – still only a few months old – change not only teaching and marking, but the very nature of the transfer of knowledge? This is the question he sets out to answer, and it’s a compelling one as we stand on the precipice of a new age of technology. Richard will read his story from the latest edition of The Monthly after a short conversation. (This episode first aired in April 2023) Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Writer Richard King.

18:14

10 Jan 24

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Download on the App Store
Get it on Google Play
Download on the App Store