facebook
twitter
copy link
The Briefing

The Briefing

facebook
twitter
copy link

A daily news podcast, The Briefing gives you the latest headlines, discussion and explainer interviews, all in under 20 minutes. Bringing you the news you need to know at 6am and 3pm Monday to Friday, and profiles across the weekend, The Br

More

#News & Opinion

Season 5


Harrison Butker wants women to graduate to "wife" and "mother"

Social media has gone into meltdown after a video from a US college commencement speech went viral. The footage shows NFL player and Kansas City Chiefs kicker Harrison Butker addressing the female graduates in the crowd, telling them that ultimately, their main and most valuable vocation in life is being a wife and mother. Butker has sparked a storm of criticism, the NFL even coming out to distance itself from his comments. In the post #MeToo world and amidst a spike in violence against women in Australia, we’re breaking down and debunking Butker’s comments and why they are so dangerous.'' Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Harrison Butker wants women to graduate to "wife" and "mother"

Social media has gone into meltdown after a video from a US college commencement speech went viral. The footage shows NFL player and Kansas City Chiefs kicker Harrison Butker addressing the female graduates in the crowd, telling them that ultimately, their main and most valuable vocation in life is being a wife and mother. Butker has sparked a storm of criticism, the NFL even coming out to distance itself from his comments. In the post #MeToo world and amidst a spike in violence against women in Australia, we’re breaking down and debunking Butker’s comments and why they are so dangerous.'' Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

15:33

EP229 - S5

17 May 24

AI Just got more human, should we be afraid?

This week Chat GPT revealed the next steps in the way their AI interacts with humans. Now the interface can recognise emotions and have more nuanced conversations with the user. Meanwhile Google has revealed its new AI assistant “Astra” and their plans to scrabble back searches previously lost to Chat GPT by integrating more AI into Google search. But what is the cost of greater humanising of AI? And is it safe? Tech entrepreneur Ashi Bhat joins The Briefing to unpack the AI rat race. Headlines: Peter Dutton wants to slash immigration  Company at the centre of major data hack revealed  ANU and Deakin University move to shut down pro-Palestine encampments Namatjira responds to Rinehart portrait controversy  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

AI Just got more human, should we be afraid?

This week Chat GPT revealed the next steps in the way their AI interacts with humans. Now the interface can recognise emotions and have more nuanced conversations with the user. Meanwhile Google has revealed its new AI assistant “Astra” and their plans to scrabble back searches previously lost to Chat GPT by integrating more AI into Google search. But what is the cost of greater humanising of AI? And is it safe? Tech entrepreneur Ashi Bhat joins The Briefing to unpack the AI rat race. Headlines: Peter Dutton wants to slash immigration  Company at the centre of major data hack revealed  ANU and Deakin University move to shut down pro-Palestine encampments Namatjira responds to Rinehart portrait controversy  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

24:19

EP228 - S5

16 May 24

Great holidays. Secure job. So why are teachers quitting?

Australia is in the grip of a teacher shortage that is a decade in the making.   New research by McCrindle has revealed more than half of educators are considering leaving the profession. On top of that, teaching is increasingly becoming an aging profession, with 20% of the workforce to reach retirement age over the next decade. On today’s briefing, we speak with social researcher and demographer, Mark McCrindle, to explore why this is happening and what’s being done to attract more people to study teaching. Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Great holidays. Secure job. So why are teachers quitting?

Australia is in the grip of a teacher shortage that is a decade in the making.   New research by McCrindle has revealed more than half of educators are considering leaving the profession. On top of that, teaching is increasingly becoming an aging profession, with 20% of the workforce to reach retirement age over the next decade. On today’s briefing, we speak with social researcher and demographer, Mark McCrindle, to explore why this is happening and what’s being done to attract more people to study teaching. Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

11:47

EP227 - S5

16 May 24

Do we have a secret role in the war in Gaza?

For over half a century, the US and Australia have operated Pine Gap - a joint top-secret spy base at Alice Springs in the heart of outback Australia Today, concern is mounting that spies at Pine Gap may be eavesdropping on the Middle East and passing critical information on to the Israeli Defence Force. This would mean Australia is playing a role in the conflict, raising serious questions about the public’s right to know how our land, resources and geographical advantage is being deployed, especially when it makes us a nuclear target for foreign powers. Today we’re joined by Alice Springs journalist Alexandra Barwick, host of new ABC podcast Spies in the Outback, to assess the evidence and get a local perspective. Headlines: Sydney council reverses same sex parent book ban Slovakia PM shot in assassination attempt  Labor senator breaks ranks to label Israel’s war in Gaza genocide Gina Rinehart has demanded the National Gallery of Australia remove a portrait of her Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Do we have a secret role in the war in Gaza?

For over half a century, the US and Australia have operated Pine Gap - a joint top-secret spy base at Alice Springs in the heart of outback Australia Today, concern is mounting that spies at Pine Gap may be eavesdropping on the Middle East and passing critical information on to the Israeli Defence Force. This would mean Australia is playing a role in the conflict, raising serious questions about the public’s right to know how our land, resources and geographical advantage is being deployed, especially when it makes us a nuclear target for foreign powers. Today we’re joined by Alice Springs journalist Alexandra Barwick, host of new ABC podcast Spies in the Outback, to assess the evidence and get a local perspective. Headlines: Sydney council reverses same sex parent book ban Slovakia PM shot in assassination attempt  Labor senator breaks ranks to label Israel’s war in Gaza genocide Gina Rinehart has demanded the National Gallery of Australia remove a portrait of her Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

21:33

EP226 - S5

15 May 24

How Coca-Cola is selling you bottled water you already own

When you take a gulp of bottled Mt Franklin spring water, you might imagine it comes from a pristine and abundant water source in an exotic wilderness location.  But In reality, Coca-Cola has been legally pumping groundwater for free out of a bore on the outskirts of Perth in WA to sell as bottled water for 32 years.  And now residents have had enough. They’re worried about the amount of water being extracted without obvious oversight in a region that’s drying out and prone to fire. WA Water Minister Simone McGurk talks to Simon Beaton about what she's doing to hold Coca-Cola to account. Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

How Coca-Cola is selling you bottled water you already own

When you take a gulp of bottled Mt Franklin spring water, you might imagine it comes from a pristine and abundant water source in an exotic wilderness location.  But In reality, Coca-Cola has been legally pumping groundwater for free out of a bore on the outskirts of Perth in WA to sell as bottled water for 32 years.  And now residents have had enough. They’re worried about the amount of water being extracted without obvious oversight in a region that’s drying out and prone to fire. WA Water Minister Simone McGurk talks to Simon Beaton about what she's doing to hold Coca-Cola to account. Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

12:43

EP225 - S5

15 May 24

Federal Budget - The top five things that matter the most

Last night, Treasurer Jim Chalmers handed down the Budget, aka the economic plan for the next four years and beyond.  On the positive side, he delivered his second consecutive surplus and a bunch of cost of living sweeteners – including a new $300 payment in energy bill relief for every Australian household, which he reckons will help put downward pressure on inflation.  We saw more detail on Treasury’s optimistic new forecast showing inflation will drop below 3% by Christmas, plus the things we knew already about like Stage 3 tax cuts and $3 billion in student debt being wiped.  But on the negative side: critics have described it as a “band aid” budget that relies on a lot of variables for its economic outlook, benefits billionaires and multinationals and could actually make inflation worse.  And while the Treasurer can pat himself on the back for this year’s surplus of $9.3 billion, looks like we’re heading deep into the red next year with a $28.3 billion deficit, followed by a $42.8 per cent deficit in 2025-26.  With an election looming, the year ahead will be critical in determining if he hit the right note between bringing inflation under control without hurting the economy.  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Federal Budget - The top five things that matter the most

Last night, Treasurer Jim Chalmers handed down the Budget, aka the economic plan for the next four years and beyond.  On the positive side, he delivered his second consecutive surplus and a bunch of cost of living sweeteners – including a new $300 payment in energy bill relief for every Australian household, which he reckons will help put downward pressure on inflation.  We saw more detail on Treasury’s optimistic new forecast showing inflation will drop below 3% by Christmas, plus the things we knew already about like Stage 3 tax cuts and $3 billion in student debt being wiped.  But on the negative side: critics have described it as a “band aid” budget that relies on a lot of variables for its economic outlook, benefits billionaires and multinationals and could actually make inflation worse.  And while the Treasurer can pat himself on the back for this year’s surplus of $9.3 billion, looks like we’re heading deep into the red next year with a $28.3 billion deficit, followed by a $42.8 per cent deficit in 2025-26.  With an election looming, the year ahead will be critical in determining if he hit the right note between bringing inflation under control without hurting the economy.  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

18:43

EP224 - S5

14 May 24

Is Vladimir Putin about to hit the nuclear button?

Russian President Vladimir Putin is threatening nuclear war as his invasion of the Ukraine continues. Putin last week ordered Russian troops to perform military exercises to prepare for the use of tactical nuclear weapons.  Tactical nukes are generally smaller and less powerful than traditional nuclear weapons, but use of such weapons would be catastrophic.  It’s now been more than 800 days since Russia’s massive ground invasion of Ukraine, a military operation supposedly intended to only run for ten days.  In this episode of The Briefing, Benison speaks to Dr Keith Suter, former President of the Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies at the University of Sydney about why Putin would make this new threat now, and just how worried should we be in this moment. Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Is Vladimir Putin about to hit the nuclear button?

Russian President Vladimir Putin is threatening nuclear war as his invasion of the Ukraine continues. Putin last week ordered Russian troops to perform military exercises to prepare for the use of tactical nuclear weapons.  Tactical nukes are generally smaller and less powerful than traditional nuclear weapons, but use of such weapons would be catastrophic.  It’s now been more than 800 days since Russia’s massive ground invasion of Ukraine, a military operation supposedly intended to only run for ten days.  In this episode of The Briefing, Benison speaks to Dr Keith Suter, former President of the Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies at the University of Sydney about why Putin would make this new threat now, and just how worried should we be in this moment. Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

12:04

EP223 - S5

14 May 24

Copycat stabbings: is social media fuelling knife crimes?

It’s been a month since the horrific attack at Bondi Junction Westfield, during which a man stabbed 18 people, killing six. Most of his victims were women. The event was heavily reported on by the media, and in the wake of the tragedy we’ve seen dozens more instances of violent knife crime right around Australia. It may feel like we’re seeing an increase in these sort of attacks, but is that true? What do the stats tell us? And does more media reporting mean more people want to copy what they see? Criminologist Xanthe Mallett from the University of Newcastle joins the Briefing to breakdown Australia’s knife crime. Headlines: NSW moves on new bail laws for domestic violence offenders  X no longer forced to remove videos of Wakeley church stabbing  Treasurer to announce $9.3 billion surplus in tonight’s budget  #Blockout2024: Celebs lose hundreds of thousands of followers over their silence on Gaza and insane displays of wealth  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Copycat stabbings: is social media fuelling knife crimes?

It’s been a month since the horrific attack at Bondi Junction Westfield, during which a man stabbed 18 people, killing six. Most of his victims were women. The event was heavily reported on by the media, and in the wake of the tragedy we’ve seen dozens more instances of violent knife crime right around Australia. It may feel like we’re seeing an increase in these sort of attacks, but is that true? What do the stats tell us? And does more media reporting mean more people want to copy what they see? Criminologist Xanthe Mallett from the University of Newcastle joins the Briefing to breakdown Australia’s knife crime. Headlines: NSW moves on new bail laws for domestic violence offenders  X no longer forced to remove videos of Wakeley church stabbing  Treasurer to announce $9.3 billion surplus in tonight’s budget  #Blockout2024: Celebs lose hundreds of thousands of followers over their silence on Gaza and insane displays of wealth  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

21:35

EP222 - S5

13 May 24

Dementia kills children at the same rate as cancer. Here's why.

Childhood and dementia aren’t two words you’d expect to hear together, but children are dying from this disease at the same rate as they are dying from cancer.  One in every 2,900 children are born with childhood dementia, a progressive disease that is caused by rare neurodegenerative genetic disorders   It’s a heart-breaking condition that has historically received little attention and research hours. In this episode of The Briefing Antoinette chats to Meg Maack, Director and CEO of the Childhood Dementia Initiative, about what a new grant will mean for those suffering and their families.

Dementia kills children at the same rate as cancer. Here's why.

Childhood and dementia aren’t two words you’d expect to hear together, but children are dying from this disease at the same rate as they are dying from cancer.  One in every 2,900 children are born with childhood dementia, a progressive disease that is caused by rare neurodegenerative genetic disorders   It’s a heart-breaking condition that has historically received little attention and research hours. In this episode of The Briefing Antoinette chats to Meg Maack, Director and CEO of the Childhood Dementia Initiative, about what a new grant will mean for those suffering and their families.

13:37

EP221 - S5

13 May 24

The Atlantic ocean current that will change life as we know it

There’s a critical current in the Atlantic that moves heat, carbon, and nutrients from the tropics, which is cooled and sinks once it reaches the Arctic. The current is important because it helps regulate climate on Earth. Now this current is slowing, and it’s impact on global climate could be disastrous. At the same time we’ve seen the end of a hot, dry, El Nino weather pattern, which came after three back-to-back wet La Nina’s....and there’s a strong chance that we could see another La Nina next season too – a frequency and sequence that’s never been recorded before. So are these two weather systems linked? Could this be a sign that things might be changing faster than expected? Professor Matthew England from the University of NSW joins host Simon Beaton to answer these questions and more. Headlines: Inflation could fall to within target range by the end of the year  US steps up condemnation of Israel Man who received first pig kidney transplant dies Aussies go wild for Aurora Australis  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

The Atlantic ocean current that will change life as we know it

There’s a critical current in the Atlantic that moves heat, carbon, and nutrients from the tropics, which is cooled and sinks once it reaches the Arctic. The current is important because it helps regulate climate on Earth. Now this current is slowing, and it’s impact on global climate could be disastrous. At the same time we’ve seen the end of a hot, dry, El Nino weather pattern, which came after three back-to-back wet La Nina’s....and there’s a strong chance that we could see another La Nina next season too – a frequency and sequence that’s never been recorded before. So are these two weather systems linked? Could this be a sign that things might be changing faster than expected? Professor Matthew England from the University of NSW joins host Simon Beaton to answer these questions and more. Headlines: Inflation could fall to within target range by the end of the year  US steps up condemnation of Israel Man who received first pig kidney transplant dies Aussies go wild for Aurora Australis  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

17:33

EP220 - S5

12 May 24

Making space for the motherless on Mother's Day

For most families, Mother’s Day is about celebrating our mums and all they do for us. But for those whose Mum is no longer around, it can be a pretty tough day. New research shows this is having a big impact on women, with over 1 million losing their Mum before the age of 44. Now there are fears their grief is being ignored with women reporting higher rates of depression, anxiety, prolonged grief and post-traumatic stress. So, is their pain being ignored? And what can be done to raise more awareness to make sure they get the help they need? On today’s episode of The Briefing, we talk to Danielle Snelling – the Co-Founder of Motherless Daughters Australia to find out.

Making space for the motherless on Mother's Day

For most families, Mother’s Day is about celebrating our mums and all they do for us. But for those whose Mum is no longer around, it can be a pretty tough day. New research shows this is having a big impact on women, with over 1 million losing their Mum before the age of 44. Now there are fears their grief is being ignored with women reporting higher rates of depression, anxiety, prolonged grief and post-traumatic stress. So, is their pain being ignored? And what can be done to raise more awareness to make sure they get the help they need? On today’s episode of The Briefing, we talk to Danielle Snelling – the Co-Founder of Motherless Daughters Australia to find out.

11:44

EP219 - S5

11 May 24

Keiynan Lonsdale: The Western Sydney kid who made it big in Hollywood

Keiynan Lonsdale grew up in Sydney’s Western suburbs, with 11 siblings and a dream to make it in Hollywood. From the small screen with shows like ABC’s dance academy to the big screen with Love Simon – he’s ticking off his bucket list. Now after being in the music industry for 16 years Keiynan is embarking on his first headline tour. In this chat with Antoinette Lattouf, Keiynan breaks down his latest role in SBS a Swift Street and what it was like to come out on Instagram. You can find a Swift Street on SBS on demand here WEEKEND LIST TO EAT - Eggplant and meatball pasta from Antoinette's adopted Nonna TO WATCH - Unfrosted on Netflix TO EAT - Deconstructed sushi bowls TO LISTEN - Any soundtrack from Lin-Manuel Miranda Send us your Weekend Briefing suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

Keiynan Lonsdale: The Western Sydney kid who made it big in Hollywood

Keiynan Lonsdale grew up in Sydney’s Western suburbs, with 11 siblings and a dream to make it in Hollywood. From the small screen with shows like ABC’s dance academy to the big screen with Love Simon – he’s ticking off his bucket list. Now after being in the music industry for 16 years Keiynan is embarking on his first headline tour. In this chat with Antoinette Lattouf, Keiynan breaks down his latest role in SBS a Swift Street and what it was like to come out on Instagram. You can find a Swift Street on SBS on demand here WEEKEND LIST TO EAT - Eggplant and meatball pasta from Antoinette's adopted Nonna TO WATCH - Unfrosted on Netflix TO EAT - Deconstructed sushi bowls TO LISTEN - Any soundtrack from Lin-Manuel Miranda Send us your Weekend Briefing suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

30:30

EP218 - S5

10 May 24

Your guide to Eurovision 2024

This year marks the 68th Eurovision Song Contest. Starting out as an expression of unity and goodwill after WWII and a technical experiment to create a live televised music competition across so many borders, Eurovision now features 37 countries, including Australia.  So what happened with our entry for this year? And what else has been most controversial throughout the competition?  In this episode, Bension Siebert and Chris Spyrou unpack the history, the scandals, and what’s been most topical so far in this year’s Eurovision event. 

Your guide to Eurovision 2024

This year marks the 68th Eurovision Song Contest. Starting out as an expression of unity and goodwill after WWII and a technical experiment to create a live televised music competition across so many borders, Eurovision now features 37 countries, including Australia.  So what happened with our entry for this year? And what else has been most controversial throughout the competition?  In this episode, Bension Siebert and Chris Spyrou unpack the history, the scandals, and what’s been most topical so far in this year’s Eurovision event. 

12:17

EP217 - S5

10 May 24

How Cosmo plans to make the comeback of the century

Once upon a time, women’s magazines had a place on every hairdresser’s bench top, family kitchen table and teenager’s bedside drawer. That all changed with the advent and surging dominance of online media – and magazine numbers slowly dwindled with dozens of titles axed in Australia. Now, Cosmopolitan, one of Australia’s favourite magazines for women is making a comeback. Publisher of Cosmo, Katarina Kroslakova from KK Press, talks to Sacha Barbour Gatt about why Cosmo is making a comeback now and how she plans to make it successful. Headlines: Joe Biden says the US won’t supply weapons to Israel for Rafah invasion  The Federal Government wants us to have more babies  TikTok, Meta bosses to be grilled on how they damage society in senate inquiry Apple cops it over piano crushing ad Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

How Cosmo plans to make the comeback of the century

Once upon a time, women’s magazines had a place on every hairdresser’s bench top, family kitchen table and teenager’s bedside drawer. That all changed with the advent and surging dominance of online media – and magazine numbers slowly dwindled with dozens of titles axed in Australia. Now, Cosmopolitan, one of Australia’s favourite magazines for women is making a comeback. Publisher of Cosmo, Katarina Kroslakova from KK Press, talks to Sacha Barbour Gatt about why Cosmo is making a comeback now and how she plans to make it successful. Headlines: Joe Biden says the US won’t supply weapons to Israel for Rafah invasion  The Federal Government wants us to have more babies  TikTok, Meta bosses to be grilled on how they damage society in senate inquiry Apple cops it over piano crushing ad Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

23:18

EP216 - S5

9 May 24

Facing the consequences of our Baby Reindeer obsession

Some true crime content – like The Teacher’s Pet or Up and Vanished has helped lead detectives to suspects, even resulting in convictions on cold cases.   But armchair detectives don’t always get it right – like the TikTok star in Idaho who wrongfully accused a professor of murder.   Take the popular Netflix series Baby Reindeer, based on a wild, but true story.  Fans have started to investigate the real-life people characters were based on, despite the writer and director going to pretty great lengths to try to keep their true identities private.  Is online sleuthing here to stay? And can it cause greater harm than good?  In this episode, Sacha Barbour Gatt speaks with Greg Stratton from RMIT, who is currently writing a book about true crime and wrongful convictions. 

Facing the consequences of our Baby Reindeer obsession

Some true crime content – like The Teacher’s Pet or Up and Vanished has helped lead detectives to suspects, even resulting in convictions on cold cases.   But armchair detectives don’t always get it right – like the TikTok star in Idaho who wrongfully accused a professor of murder.   Take the popular Netflix series Baby Reindeer, based on a wild, but true story.  Fans have started to investigate the real-life people characters were based on, despite the writer and director going to pretty great lengths to try to keep their true identities private.  Is online sleuthing here to stay? And can it cause greater harm than good?  In this episode, Sacha Barbour Gatt speaks with Greg Stratton from RMIT, who is currently writing a book about true crime and wrongful convictions. 

12:53

EP215 - S5

9 May 24

Drake v Kendrick Lamar isn't just a war of words

Popular rappers Drake and Kendrick Lamar are currently embroiled in a very public spat. It’s a feud that has a long history, but things have really escalated. Hip hop journo and author Simone Amelia Jordan explains why this feud is more than petty online drama. Headlines: US pauses weapons delivery to Israel amid Rafah offensive Treasurer forecasts a growth in disposable incomes in Budget sneak peak  Stormy Daniels details Donald Trump encounter in hush money trial World reaches crucial clean energy turning point Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Drake v Kendrick Lamar isn't just a war of words

Popular rappers Drake and Kendrick Lamar are currently embroiled in a very public spat. It’s a feud that has a long history, but things have really escalated. Hip hop journo and author Simone Amelia Jordan explains why this feud is more than petty online drama. Headlines: US pauses weapons delivery to Israel amid Rafah offensive Treasurer forecasts a growth in disposable incomes in Budget sneak peak  Stormy Daniels details Donald Trump encounter in hush money trial World reaches crucial clean energy turning point Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

21:48

EP214 - S5

8 May 24

Confronting the instigator of the same-sex book ban

A local council in Sydney has voted to ban books about same-sex parents from its libraries. Six Cumberland City Councillors voted in favour of the ban, while five, including Mayor Lisa Lake, opposed it.  The New South Wales Government has warned it could breach the Anti-Discrimination Act and even threatened to pull the council’s library funding, as a result.  Councillor Steve Christou proposed the ban, arguing that most of the council’s constituents are conservative and religious, and don't want “any form of sexualised experiences” available to children in the library. But is a same-sex parenting book sexualised content? In this episode, Bension Siebert speaks with Councillor Steve Christou to find out why he proposed the ban.

Confronting the instigator of the same-sex book ban

A local council in Sydney has voted to ban books about same-sex parents from its libraries. Six Cumberland City Councillors voted in favour of the ban, while five, including Mayor Lisa Lake, opposed it.  The New South Wales Government has warned it could breach the Anti-Discrimination Act and even threatened to pull the council’s library funding, as a result.  Councillor Steve Christou proposed the ban, arguing that most of the council’s constituents are conservative and religious, and don't want “any form of sexualised experiences” available to children in the library. But is a same-sex parenting book sexualised content? In this episode, Bension Siebert speaks with Councillor Steve Christou to find out why he proposed the ban.

12:46

EP213 - S5

8 May 24

Why Australia’s birth rate is lower than ever

Australia’s birth rate has been in a relatively steady decline since a peak in the early 1960s. It’s rebounded a small amount after hitting a record low in 2020, but it still sits well below the total fertility rate of 2.1 that’s needed for a population to sustain itself. Is that a bad thing for Australia? And how does the rest of the world compare? On today’s deep dive we speak with Professor Amanda Davies from the School of Social Sciences at the University of Western Australia to try to answer those questions. Headlines: Parents of slain Aussie brothers speak for the first time Israel takes control of Palestinian side of Rafah crossing as ceasefire deal stalls Interest rates staying at 4.35 per cent TikTok sues to block US law that’d ban the app  Mona’s ‘Ladies Lounge’ could become a toilet or church in a bid to keep men out Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Why Australia’s birth rate is lower than ever

Australia’s birth rate has been in a relatively steady decline since a peak in the early 1960s. It’s rebounded a small amount after hitting a record low in 2020, but it still sits well below the total fertility rate of 2.1 that’s needed for a population to sustain itself. Is that a bad thing for Australia? And how does the rest of the world compare? On today’s deep dive we speak with Professor Amanda Davies from the School of Social Sciences at the University of Western Australia to try to answer those questions. Headlines: Parents of slain Aussie brothers speak for the first time Israel takes control of Palestinian side of Rafah crossing as ceasefire deal stalls Interest rates staying at 4.35 per cent TikTok sues to block US law that’d ban the app  Mona’s ‘Ladies Lounge’ could become a toilet or church in a bid to keep men out Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

17:50

EP212 - S5

7 May 24

This is why Israel is about to invade Rafah

Israeli tanks have reportedly been spotted just 200 metres from the edge of Rafah, less than a day after an estimated 100,000 Palestinian civilians were ordered to evacuate.  Bordering on Egypt, the southernmost city of Gaza has become the last refuge for around 1.4 million Palestinians who have fled the violence and destruction elsewhere.  The impending invasion comes after Hamas agreed to a proposed ceasefire that was declined by Israel, and after the forced the closure of foreign media outlet Al Jazeera - one of the only media broadcasters active from the Gaza strip.  To explain more, Bension Siebert is joined by Antony Loewenstein, an independent journalist, film-maker and author of the best-selling book, The Palestine Laboratory.

This is why Israel is about to invade Rafah

Israeli tanks have reportedly been spotted just 200 metres from the edge of Rafah, less than a day after an estimated 100,000 Palestinian civilians were ordered to evacuate.  Bordering on Egypt, the southernmost city of Gaza has become the last refuge for around 1.4 million Palestinians who have fled the violence and destruction elsewhere.  The impending invasion comes after Hamas agreed to a proposed ceasefire that was declined by Israel, and after the forced the closure of foreign media outlet Al Jazeera - one of the only media broadcasters active from the Gaza strip.  To explain more, Bension Siebert is joined by Antony Loewenstein, an independent journalist, film-maker and author of the best-selling book, The Palestine Laboratory.

13:18

EP211 - S5

7 May 24

Why witch hunts are still happening in 2024

Witch hunts aren’t just the stuff of colonial America; they’re happening right now all around the world. People are still being persecuted and often murdered on suspicion of being involved in witchcraft, in a trend that’s currently being driven by fundamental Christianity, poverty and civil conflict. On today’s briefing we’re joined by Professor Miranda Forsyth to find out who is at risk, why they’re being targeted and what’s being done to address the issue. Headlines: Hamas accepts “softened” ceasefire deal Tributes for Aussie brothers killed in Mexico Judge in Trump hush money trial threatens jail as ex-President breaches gag order for a 10th time Met Gala Monday is here Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Why witch hunts are still happening in 2024

Witch hunts aren’t just the stuff of colonial America; they’re happening right now all around the world. People are still being persecuted and often murdered on suspicion of being involved in witchcraft, in a trend that’s currently being driven by fundamental Christianity, poverty and civil conflict. On today’s briefing we’re joined by Professor Miranda Forsyth to find out who is at risk, why they’re being targeted and what’s being done to address the issue. Headlines: Hamas accepts “softened” ceasefire deal Tributes for Aussie brothers killed in Mexico Judge in Trump hush money trial threatens jail as ex-President breaches gag order for a 10th time Met Gala Monday is here Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

19:46

EP210 - S5

6 May 24

How our youth are being radicalised, and how we can stop it

Over the weekend in Perth, a sixteen-year-old boy has been shot dead by police after allegedly wounding a man who was unknown to him with a knife. WA Premier Roger Cook has said that there were indications that the teenager had been radicalised online. The news comes just weeks after Sydney's Wakeley church attack, where another 16-year-old boy allegedly stabbed Bishop Mar Mari Emmanuel, in what has been labelled a terrorist act. In this episode, Bension Siebert speaks with internationally renowned expert on terrorism and extremism, Deakin University Professor Greg Barton, to establish how big of an issue radicalisation is in Australia, and what is being done to prevent and safeguard our youth. 

How our youth are being radicalised, and how we can stop it

Over the weekend in Perth, a sixteen-year-old boy has been shot dead by police after allegedly wounding a man who was unknown to him with a knife. WA Premier Roger Cook has said that there were indications that the teenager had been radicalised online. The news comes just weeks after Sydney's Wakeley church attack, where another 16-year-old boy allegedly stabbed Bishop Mar Mari Emmanuel, in what has been labelled a terrorist act. In this episode, Bension Siebert speaks with internationally renowned expert on terrorism and extremism, Deakin University Professor Greg Barton, to establish how big of an issue radicalisation is in Australia, and what is being done to prevent and safeguard our youth. 

11:53

EP209 - S5

6 May 24

Could Beijing be underwater in 100 years?

Cities in China are sinking and satellite imagery shows Beijing is among one of the fastest going under. According to a new study in the journal Science, development and groundwater pumping are causing land subsidence and heightening the risks of sea level rise. Within 100 years, a quarter of China’s urban coastal land could sit below sea level. In this episode of The Briefing, we’re joined by Robert Nicholls, a climate scientist and civil engineer at the University of East Anglia who reviewed the paper to find out why China’s cities are sinking and what can be done to fix the problem Headlines: Israel shuts down Al Jazeera Labor to introduce weekly payment for nursing, teaching students on placements Free Madonna concert draws crowd of 1.6 million in Rio de Janeiro Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Could Beijing be underwater in 100 years?

Cities in China are sinking and satellite imagery shows Beijing is among one of the fastest going under. According to a new study in the journal Science, development and groundwater pumping are causing land subsidence and heightening the risks of sea level rise. Within 100 years, a quarter of China’s urban coastal land could sit below sea level. In this episode of The Briefing, we’re joined by Robert Nicholls, a climate scientist and civil engineer at the University of East Anglia who reviewed the paper to find out why China’s cities are sinking and what can be done to fix the problem Headlines: Israel shuts down Al Jazeera Labor to introduce weekly payment for nursing, teaching students on placements Free Madonna concert draws crowd of 1.6 million in Rio de Janeiro Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

19:41

EP208 - S5

5 May 24

Ziggy Ramo wants you to feel uncomfortable

Ziggy Ramo is a Wik man, powerful storyteller and rapper - but it took him fives years to release his first album because the world wasn't ready to embrace his art and perspective. Soon after the Black Lives Matter movement Ziggy set his words into the world releasing his music and he’s now written a book – his memoir – Human? In this chat with Antoinette Lattouf, Ziggy explains how racism in Australia continues to dehumanise groups of people and what lead him to rap. Ziggy will be appearing speaking throughout the Melbourne Writers Festival and on May 10th Jan Fran will be joining Ziggy live. Event details here WEEKEND LIST TO READ - Pheasants Nest by Louise Milligan TO EAT- Pasta salad by Emily English on TikTok TO WATCH - Baby Reindeer on Netflix TO LISTEN - I Forgot to Tell You Something podcast

Ziggy Ramo wants you to feel uncomfortable

Ziggy Ramo is a Wik man, powerful storyteller and rapper - but it took him fives years to release his first album because the world wasn't ready to embrace his art and perspective. Soon after the Black Lives Matter movement Ziggy set his words into the world releasing his music and he’s now written a book – his memoir – Human? In this chat with Antoinette Lattouf, Ziggy explains how racism in Australia continues to dehumanise groups of people and what lead him to rap. Ziggy will be appearing speaking throughout the Melbourne Writers Festival and on May 10th Jan Fran will be joining Ziggy live. Event details here WEEKEND LIST TO READ - Pheasants Nest by Louise Milligan TO EAT- Pasta salad by Emily English on TikTok TO WATCH - Baby Reindeer on Netflix TO LISTEN - I Forgot to Tell You Something podcast

30:25

EP207 - S5

3 May 24

Why smut is the new porn

Smut used to be the kind of genre you’d find hidden away in the back corner of bookstores. But not anymore. Now, smut series are being featured on the New York Times Best Sellers list, and a quick search of #spicybook or #smut on TikTok will find hundreds of thousands of videos. But that doesn’t mean it doesn’t have its issues. In this episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert speaks with Esmé Louise James, author of “Kinky History”, to find out about the history of smut, discuss problematic characters, and get her personal smutty recommendations.

Why smut is the new porn

Smut used to be the kind of genre you’d find hidden away in the back corner of bookstores. But not anymore. Now, smut series are being featured on the New York Times Best Sellers list, and a quick search of #spicybook or #smut on TikTok will find hundreds of thousands of videos. But that doesn’t mean it doesn’t have its issues. In this episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert speaks with Esmé Louise James, author of “Kinky History”, to find out about the history of smut, discuss problematic characters, and get her personal smutty recommendations.

12:31

EP206 - S5

3 May 24

The Matildas effect: Is the soccer boom here to stay?

Since the Matildas world cup frenzy we’ve seen a rise in soccer participation numbers – not just for young girls – but also boys and older women too. The A League Women season will come to a close tomorrow with Melbourne City taking on Sydney FC in what will hopefully be a record-breaking crowd. On today’s briefing, we chat to Moya Dodd, lawyer, sports administrator and former Matilda, to find out if these numbers are sustainable. Headlines: Police dismantle UCLA pro-Palestine encampment as Biden speaks out  New ad campaign to show misogynistic social media feeds Aussie kids are seeing Australia’s housing crisis not going anywhere Sex scenes decline by 40% in Hollywood flicks Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

The Matildas effect: Is the soccer boom here to stay?

Since the Matildas world cup frenzy we’ve seen a rise in soccer participation numbers – not just for young girls – but also boys and older women too. The A League Women season will come to a close tomorrow with Melbourne City taking on Sydney FC in what will hopefully be a record-breaking crowd. On today’s briefing, we chat to Moya Dodd, lawyer, sports administrator and former Matilda, to find out if these numbers are sustainable. Headlines: Police dismantle UCLA pro-Palestine encampment as Biden speaks out  New ad campaign to show misogynistic social media feeds Aussie kids are seeing Australia’s housing crisis not going anywhere Sex scenes decline by 40% in Hollywood flicks Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

25:17

EP205 - S5

2 May 24

Are nicotine pouches the new vapes?

Snus is a small tobacco sachet placed between your gum and upper lip. But now there’s a new form of ‘snussing’, with products that take out the tobacco and replace it with flavours like cool mint, espresso, or bellini, and leave in the nicotine.  Advertised on TikTok as an alternative to vaping, following a federal crackdown on non-prescription vapes, are these products just another sneaky way to keep the tobacco industry alive? In this episode, Sacha Barbour Gatt speaks with Associate Professor Becky Freeman, from the School of Public Health at Sydney University, to learn more about nicotine pouches and their growing popularity in Australia.

Are nicotine pouches the new vapes?

Snus is a small tobacco sachet placed between your gum and upper lip. But now there’s a new form of ‘snussing’, with products that take out the tobacco and replace it with flavours like cool mint, espresso, or bellini, and leave in the nicotine.  Advertised on TikTok as an alternative to vaping, following a federal crackdown on non-prescription vapes, are these products just another sneaky way to keep the tobacco industry alive? In this episode, Sacha Barbour Gatt speaks with Associate Professor Becky Freeman, from the School of Public Health at Sydney University, to learn more about nicotine pouches and their growing popularity in Australia.

11:39

EP204 - S5

2 May 24

Inside student camps for Palestine at Australian universities

A movement is growing around the world protesting Israel’s offensive against Palestine in the Middle East. This time it feels different. More than 100 students at Columbia University in New York were arrested last month when the college called in police to break up their protest, an encampment in the university’s quadrangle. Riot police were called in yesterday to remove students from a campus building. The arrests at Columbia marked a defining moment in the global protest – and similar protest encampments are springing up on campuses across the globe. In this episode of The Briefing, LiSTNR reporter Helen Smith visits an encampment at Sydney University to find out how and why the students have decided to join the global campaign.   Headlines: What’s come out of yesterday’s National Cabinet meeting on domestic violence? US Uni protests escalate into violence New AI chatbot launching on our iPhones  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Inside student camps for Palestine at Australian universities

A movement is growing around the world protesting Israel’s offensive against Palestine in the Middle East. This time it feels different. More than 100 students at Columbia University in New York were arrested last month when the college called in police to break up their protest, an encampment in the university’s quadrangle. Riot police were called in yesterday to remove students from a campus building. The arrests at Columbia marked a defining moment in the global protest – and similar protest encampments are springing up on campuses across the globe. In this episode of The Briefing, LiSTNR reporter Helen Smith visits an encampment at Sydney University to find out how and why the students have decided to join the global campaign.   Headlines: What’s come out of yesterday’s National Cabinet meeting on domestic violence? US Uni protests escalate into violence New AI chatbot launching on our iPhones  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

22:49

EP203 - S5

1 May 24

Driverless cars. Would you climb into an autonomous vehicle?

Experiments on driverless - or autonomous - cars began 100 years ago, but only in the last twenty years have they become a genuine reality. Elon Musk's Telsa announced last month it was launching an autonomous taxi. How do they work? How safe are they? And how long will it be before we're all expected to share the road with autonomous vehicles? In this episode of The Briefing, we're joined by James Ward from Drive.com.au to discuss the latest developments in autonomous vehicles.

Driverless cars. Would you climb into an autonomous vehicle?

Experiments on driverless - or autonomous - cars began 100 years ago, but only in the last twenty years have they become a genuine reality. Elon Musk's Telsa announced last month it was launching an autonomous taxi. How do they work? How safe are they? And how long will it be before we're all expected to share the road with autonomous vehicles? In this episode of The Briefing, we're joined by James Ward from Drive.com.au to discuss the latest developments in autonomous vehicles.

12:23

EP202 - S5

1 May 24

Arman's dad killed his mum. Here's how he broke the cycle

Over the last few weeks, our national conversation has been heavily focused on the number of lives that have been taken by men because of domestic violence. Arman Abrahimzadeh lost his mother to domestic violence in 2010 when his father murdered her in front of 300 people. Since then Arman has dedicated his life to trying to end family and domestic abuse - talking to perpetrators in prisons, young people and across schools. On this episode, Arman joins us to discuss how we can stop the abuse, stop re-offenders, and protect victim-survivors. Lifeline - 13 11 14 1800RESPECT - 1800 737 732 Headlines: National Cabinet to discuss tracking DV offenders, online content   Donald Trump fined $13,000 and threatened with jail time over gag order  Bonza enters voluntary administration  King Charles returns to public duties  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Arman's dad killed his mum. Here's how he broke the cycle

Over the last few weeks, our national conversation has been heavily focused on the number of lives that have been taken by men because of domestic violence. Arman Abrahimzadeh lost his mother to domestic violence in 2010 when his father murdered her in front of 300 people. Since then Arman has dedicated his life to trying to end family and domestic abuse - talking to perpetrators in prisons, young people and across schools. On this episode, Arman joins us to discuss how we can stop the abuse, stop re-offenders, and protect victim-survivors. Lifeline - 13 11 14 1800RESPECT - 1800 737 732 Headlines: National Cabinet to discuss tracking DV offenders, online content   Donald Trump fined $13,000 and threatened with jail time over gag order  Bonza enters voluntary administration  King Charles returns to public duties  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

23:05

EP201 - S5

30 Apr 24

Ozempic has revolutionised weight loss. Can it help with addiction too?

Ozempic is the new wonder drug sweeping the world of weight loss. But now a new surprising side effect has potentially been uncovered. There's anecdotal evidence that semaglutide – the active ingredient in Ozempic, may also be able to reduce the desire for alcohol, cigarettes and other drugs. Now, research is being undertaken to find out if science can back up those claims. In this episode of The Briefing, Simon Beaton speaks with Dr Leigh Walker from the Florey Institute to find out what we know already, and how safe Ozempic could be to treat addictions.

Ozempic has revolutionised weight loss. Can it help with addiction too?

Ozempic is the new wonder drug sweeping the world of weight loss. But now a new surprising side effect has potentially been uncovered. There's anecdotal evidence that semaglutide – the active ingredient in Ozempic, may also be able to reduce the desire for alcohol, cigarettes and other drugs. Now, research is being undertaken to find out if science can back up those claims. In this episode of The Briefing, Simon Beaton speaks with Dr Leigh Walker from the Florey Institute to find out what we know already, and how safe Ozempic could be to treat addictions.

10:07

EP200 - S5

30 Apr 24

Does forcing mentally ill people into treatment work?

Imagine going to your doctor and having treatment forced upon you. This is called compulsory treatment and in Australia it’s legal. Compulsory mental health treatment is when a psychiatrist believes that a patient is at a severe risk of harming themselves or others, who can then be forced to take medication or undergo treatment. But how subjective is that decision on labelling the risk? And if the medical practitioner gets it wrong it means a loss of their rights, and quite often incredibly strong and debilitating medication. Dr Kay Wilson from the University of Melbourne joins the Briefing to explain how compulsory treatment works and the stigmas attached to mental health in Australia. Headlines: 30% spike in women killed by intimate partners last year US hopeful Hamas will accept new ceasefire offer Telcos to be forced to prioritise Triple Zero functions in outages News from the Royals Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Does forcing mentally ill people into treatment work?

Imagine going to your doctor and having treatment forced upon you. This is called compulsory treatment and in Australia it’s legal. Compulsory mental health treatment is when a psychiatrist believes that a patient is at a severe risk of harming themselves or others, who can then be forced to take medication or undergo treatment. But how subjective is that decision on labelling the risk? And if the medical practitioner gets it wrong it means a loss of their rights, and quite often incredibly strong and debilitating medication. Dr Kay Wilson from the University of Melbourne joins the Briefing to explain how compulsory treatment works and the stigmas attached to mental health in Australia. Headlines: 30% spike in women killed by intimate partners last year US hopeful Hamas will accept new ceasefire offer Telcos to be forced to prioritise Triple Zero functions in outages News from the Royals Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

23:10

EP199 - S5

29 Apr 24

Finland is ending homelessness, so could we do it here too?

At least 120-thousand people are experiencing homelessness in any given night in Australia. And this isn't a problem that only we are facing, with many countries around the globe struggling to tackle the homelessness issue.  However, this isn’t the case in Finland.   In their capital, Helsinki, the government aims to end homelessness – or get it down to where becoming homeless is likely to be very temporary for most people – by 2025.  So how are they doing this? And could Australia learn from what they’re doing right?  On this episode, Bension Siebert speaks with Juha Kahila, Head of International Affairs at the Y-Foundation, as he joins us from Finland. 

Finland is ending homelessness, so could we do it here too?

At least 120-thousand people are experiencing homelessness in any given night in Australia. And this isn't a problem that only we are facing, with many countries around the globe struggling to tackle the homelessness issue.  However, this isn’t the case in Finland.   In their capital, Helsinki, the government aims to end homelessness – or get it down to where becoming homeless is likely to be very temporary for most people – by 2025.  So how are they doing this? And could Australia learn from what they’re doing right?  On this episode, Bension Siebert speaks with Juha Kahila, Head of International Affairs at the Y-Foundation, as he joins us from Finland. 

11:55

EP198 - S5

29 Apr 24

"Playboy Rapist” survivor on how we can stop more women dying

Huge crowds gathered at the weekend to protest laws that see high-risk offenders released on bail. As anger mounts over this year’s soaring domestic violence death toll, we speak with Kay Schubach, a domestic violence survivor about what really needs to change to stop more Australian women dying at the hands of offenders released by our courts. In this episode of The Briefing, Kay joins Sacha Barbour Gatt to talk about what we can all do – from the public to government and judicial system - to break the horrific cycle of post-custody attacks by high-risk domestic violence offenders. Headlines: Emergency National Cabinet meeting called after weekend of gender violence rallies Antony Blinken to travel to Saudi Arabia to help restart ceasefire talks Australia’s Defence Minister has spent the weekend in Ukraine Titanic watch breaks records at auction Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

"Playboy Rapist” survivor on how we can stop more women dying

Huge crowds gathered at the weekend to protest laws that see high-risk offenders released on bail. As anger mounts over this year’s soaring domestic violence death toll, we speak with Kay Schubach, a domestic violence survivor about what really needs to change to stop more Australian women dying at the hands of offenders released by our courts. In this episode of The Briefing, Kay joins Sacha Barbour Gatt to talk about what we can all do – from the public to government and judicial system - to break the horrific cycle of post-custody attacks by high-risk domestic violence offenders. Headlines: Emergency National Cabinet meeting called after weekend of gender violence rallies Antony Blinken to travel to Saudi Arabia to help restart ceasefire talks Australia’s Defence Minister has spent the weekend in Ukraine Titanic watch breaks records at auction Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

24:20

EP197 - S5

28 Apr 24

How Tim Duggan got out of a one million dollar tax bill

Do you feel like you have a good work-life balance? It’s something that most people struggle with, particularly with current cost-of-living pressures. Tim Duggan is the co-founder of Junkee Media. As a young man who launched several digital media platforms he knows a thing or two about work life balance. He’s also the author of several books, his latest is called Work Backwards. In this interview with Tom Tilley he talks about what he did with the freedom to choose his work, after selling Junkee for around 15 million dollars. Send us your Weekend Briefing suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

How Tim Duggan got out of a one million dollar tax bill

Do you feel like you have a good work-life balance? It’s something that most people struggle with, particularly with current cost-of-living pressures. Tim Duggan is the co-founder of Junkee Media. As a young man who launched several digital media platforms he knows a thing or two about work life balance. He’s also the author of several books, his latest is called Work Backwards. In this interview with Tom Tilley he talks about what he did with the freedom to choose his work, after selling Junkee for around 15 million dollars. Send us your Weekend Briefing suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

41:12

EP196 - S5

27 Apr 24

Nina Oyama is an iPad kid who wants us to hire more lesbians

Nina Oyama wants people to hire more lesbians. She also has a fondness for iPads over mobiles. But most of all, Nina is funny. She’s a comedian, actor and award-winning writer and director who can go from smutty stand-up to sweet characters on screen. Her portrayal of the uptight eco warrior Courtney in Utopia or the anxious policewoman Abby in Deadloch being some of her stand out performances. Her latest live show is called 'Nina Oyama is Coming' and in this chat with Antoinette Lattouf, she explains why you’ll never look back if you hire a lesbian and why her greatest achievement in life involves hanging upside down. Tickets to Nina's show here WEEKEND LIST TO LISTEN - Ushers album Coming Home TO TRY - Foot lotion and socks TO TRY - Order coffee using fake names TO LISTEN - Clara Bow Scandal series on Shameless Send us your Weekend Briefing suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

Nina Oyama is an iPad kid who wants us to hire more lesbians

Nina Oyama wants people to hire more lesbians. She also has a fondness for iPads over mobiles. But most of all, Nina is funny. She’s a comedian, actor and award-winning writer and director who can go from smutty stand-up to sweet characters on screen. Her portrayal of the uptight eco warrior Courtney in Utopia or the anxious policewoman Abby in Deadloch being some of her stand out performances. Her latest live show is called 'Nina Oyama is Coming' and in this chat with Antoinette Lattouf, she explains why you’ll never look back if you hire a lesbian and why her greatest achievement in life involves hanging upside down. Tickets to Nina's show here WEEKEND LIST TO LISTEN - Ushers album Coming Home TO TRY - Foot lotion and socks TO TRY - Order coffee using fake names TO LISTEN - Clara Bow Scandal series on Shameless Send us your Weekend Briefing suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

34:50

EP195 - S5

26 Apr 24

Australia's space rocket industry is about to really take off

A rocket is set to take off soon from North Queensland, becoming the first locally made orbital rocket to blast off from Australian soil. It will also mark our country as one of only twelve around the globe that can boast space launch technology that goes from build to launch. Yet, strangely enough, this rocket is highly likely to fail. On this episode, Bension Siebert speaks with LiSTNR journalist, Courtney Thomas, to discuss why it’s so significant, and why the small town of Bowen, south of Townsville, has been chosen for the launch site.   

Australia's space rocket industry is about to really take off

A rocket is set to take off soon from North Queensland, becoming the first locally made orbital rocket to blast off from Australian soil. It will also mark our country as one of only twelve around the globe that can boast space launch technology that goes from build to launch. Yet, strangely enough, this rocket is highly likely to fail. On this episode, Bension Siebert speaks with LiSTNR journalist, Courtney Thomas, to discuss why it’s so significant, and why the small town of Bowen, south of Townsville, has been chosen for the launch site.   

09:20

EP194 - S5

26 Apr 24

Is Columbia University a defining moment in student protest?

Columbia University in New York this week called in police to arrest pro-Palestinian protestors. Universities have always championed free speech. Is Columbia a sign of the changing nature of protest in our tertiary institutions? Once places that encouraged challenging discussions on politics and culture. In this episode of The Briefing, we’re joined by Tim Briedis, an academic and historian from the University of Sydney who specialises in the history of student activism, to discuss how and why protest culture at our universities has changed and what it means for the future of dialogue on politics and culture. Headlines: Harvey Weinstein’s 2020 rape conviction has been overturned E-safety: Dutton says we can’t police the world  Australians hit by biggest tax increase in the world 100 whales saved off the coast of WA The iconic Moulin Rouge sails have fallen off Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Is Columbia University a defining moment in student protest?

Columbia University in New York this week called in police to arrest pro-Palestinian protestors. Universities have always championed free speech. Is Columbia a sign of the changing nature of protest in our tertiary institutions? Once places that encouraged challenging discussions on politics and culture. In this episode of The Briefing, we’re joined by Tim Briedis, an academic and historian from the University of Sydney who specialises in the history of student activism, to discuss how and why protest culture at our universities has changed and what it means for the future of dialogue on politics and culture. Headlines: Harvey Weinstein’s 2020 rape conviction has been overturned E-safety: Dutton says we can’t police the world  Australians hit by biggest tax increase in the world 100 whales saved off the coast of WA The iconic Moulin Rouge sails have fallen off Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

23:38

EP193 - S5

25 Apr 24

The outback pub where two-up is legal all year round

At pubs around the country, people are watching pairs of coins tossed in the air for the classic ANZAC Day tradition of playing two-up.  In most parts of Australia it’s illegal to play this quintessentially Australian game any day other than ANZAC Day.  But one pub in Broken Hill – the far west New South Wales mining town near the border South Australia – it's played legally every Friday night.  So how is it that two-up is legal any time of the year are mid-sized pub in the middle of the outback?  Ringmaster of two-up at the Palace Hotel in Broken Hill Fisk Nagas joins Bension Siebert to explain. 

The outback pub where two-up is legal all year round

At pubs around the country, people are watching pairs of coins tossed in the air for the classic ANZAC Day tradition of playing two-up.  In most parts of Australia it’s illegal to play this quintessentially Australian game any day other than ANZAC Day.  But one pub in Broken Hill – the far west New South Wales mining town near the border South Australia – it's played legally every Friday night.  So how is it that two-up is legal any time of the year are mid-sized pub in the middle of the outback?  Ringmaster of two-up at the Palace Hotel in Broken Hill Fisk Nagas joins Bension Siebert to explain. 

10:01

EP192 - S5

25 Apr 24

The rise and rise of ANZAC day

On this Anzac Day morning, we reflect on the rise and rise of Anzac Day and how only a generation ago, it was declining before a huge upsurge in interest and favour in the late 1990s. The day has not always been as revered as it is today. We’re joined by Anzac historian Mat McLachlan to discuss the current popularity of Anzac Day, and whether it will survive into the future.

The rise and rise of ANZAC day

On this Anzac Day morning, we reflect on the rise and rise of Anzac Day and how only a generation ago, it was declining before a huge upsurge in interest and favour in the late 1990s. The day has not always been as revered as it is today. We’re joined by Anzac historian Mat McLachlan to discuss the current popularity of Anzac Day, and whether it will survive into the future.

18:13

EP191 - S5

24 Apr 24

Would tougher bail laws make women safer?

At the beginning of this week, a woman was allegedly murdered by her former partner while he was out on bail. He’d been charged with her rape as well as intimidation. The alleged incident has thrown our bail laws into sharp relief, with both federal and state politicians pledging to do more to keep women safe.   In this episode of The Briefing, Sacha Barbour Gatt speaks with Dr Terry Goldsworthy, an associate professor in criminology at Bond University, about whether our bail laws need to change. 

Would tougher bail laws make women safer?

At the beginning of this week, a woman was allegedly murdered by her former partner while he was out on bail. He’d been charged with her rape as well as intimidation. The alleged incident has thrown our bail laws into sharp relief, with both federal and state politicians pledging to do more to keep women safe.   In this episode of The Briefing, Sacha Barbour Gatt speaks with Dr Terry Goldsworthy, an associate professor in criminology at Bond University, about whether our bail laws need to change. 

11:54

EP190 - S5

24 Apr 24

More parents are choosing to keep their kids off socials

Social media has become entrenched in our society, replacing town squares and the water cooler as the place we come together to share our lives, our thoughts and our ideas. But the internet can be a dangerous place, especially for kids, where predators lurk, scams are rife and content inappropriate for young eyes is readily available. Even innocent trends can prove dangerous; think intense skincare regimes designed for 30- somethings becoming popular among little kids who just want to be like their favourite influencer. So, it’s no surprise that new research has revealed parents are looking to delay their children’s entry into the world of social media – but are they fighting a losing battle? Headlines: Donald Trump is back in court for day two of his criminal trial  200 days of war on Gaza Coalition to call for compulsory age verification on social media Indigenous spears returned from Cambridge University Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

More parents are choosing to keep their kids off socials

Social media has become entrenched in our society, replacing town squares and the water cooler as the place we come together to share our lives, our thoughts and our ideas. But the internet can be a dangerous place, especially for kids, where predators lurk, scams are rife and content inappropriate for young eyes is readily available. Even innocent trends can prove dangerous; think intense skincare regimes designed for 30- somethings becoming popular among little kids who just want to be like their favourite influencer. So, it’s no surprise that new research has revealed parents are looking to delay their children’s entry into the world of social media – but are they fighting a losing battle? Headlines: Donald Trump is back in court for day two of his criminal trial  200 days of war on Gaza Coalition to call for compulsory age verification on social media Indigenous spears returned from Cambridge University Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

22:28

EP189 - S5

23 Apr 24

Meet the double act who want to be Australia's first job-sharing MP

For the first time, two independent candidates are attempting to run for federal parliament as ‘job-sharing candidates’.   Lucy Bradlow and Bronwen Bock want to run for the Melbourne seat of Higgins as a single candidate on the ballot paper. They claim that they could do the role like any other job-share – splitting duties, making join decisions, sharing the salary – and that allowing job-sharing would make parliament more representative of modern Australian society.  But is it constitutionally legal for two people to run as a single federal member? And how would this actually work?  Joining Bension Siebert are the job-sharing independent candidates for the singular seat of Higgins in Melbourne, Bronwen Bock and Lucy Bradlow. 

Meet the double act who want to be Australia's first job-sharing MP

For the first time, two independent candidates are attempting to run for federal parliament as ‘job-sharing candidates’.   Lucy Bradlow and Bronwen Bock want to run for the Melbourne seat of Higgins as a single candidate on the ballot paper. They claim that they could do the role like any other job-share – splitting duties, making join decisions, sharing the salary – and that allowing job-sharing would make parliament more representative of modern Australian society.  But is it constitutionally legal for two people to run as a single federal member? And how would this actually work?  Joining Bension Siebert are the job-sharing independent candidates for the singular seat of Higgins in Melbourne, Bronwen Bock and Lucy Bradlow. 

12:04

EP188 - S5

23 Apr 24

Doctors Note: The consequences

Today, we bring you the final episode of our exclusive, three-part special investigation into the risky new frontier of Australia's healthcare system. The Briefing's investigative team went undercover online to expose the risks Australia's government, medical regulators and doctors' groups are only now beginning to realise. The investigation reveals how the crisis in Australia's GP practices has degraded the way healthcare being is done online - including by doctors working for one of this country's biggest corporations. In our last part of Doctors Note - we find out the consequences for doctors who practice this kind of healthcare, and hear from the people meant to keep us safe about what they're going to do about it. Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Doctors Note: The consequences

Today, we bring you the final episode of our exclusive, three-part special investigation into the risky new frontier of Australia's healthcare system. The Briefing's investigative team went undercover online to expose the risks Australia's government, medical regulators and doctors' groups are only now beginning to realise. The investigation reveals how the crisis in Australia's GP practices has degraded the way healthcare being is done online - including by doctors working for one of this country's biggest corporations. In our last part of Doctors Note - we find out the consequences for doctors who practice this kind of healthcare, and hear from the people meant to keep us safe about what they're going to do about it. Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

17:00

EP187 - S5

22 Apr 24

Doctors Note: The sting operation

Today, we bring you the second part of our exclusive, three-part special investigation into the risky new frontier of Australia's healthcare system.   The Briefing's investigative team went undercover online to expose the risks Australia's government, medical regulators and doctors' groups are only now beginning to realise.  The investigation reveals how the crisis in Australia's GP practices has degraded the way healthcare being is done online - including by doctors working for one of this country’s biggest corporations.  In part two of Doctors Note - we show you how we went undercover, and expose the potential danger that online medical services pose to your health.

Doctors Note: The sting operation

Today, we bring you the second part of our exclusive, three-part special investigation into the risky new frontier of Australia's healthcare system.   The Briefing's investigative team went undercover online to expose the risks Australia's government, medical regulators and doctors' groups are only now beginning to realise.  The investigation reveals how the crisis in Australia's GP practices has degraded the way healthcare being is done online - including by doctors working for one of this country’s biggest corporations.  In part two of Doctors Note - we show you how we went undercover, and expose the potential danger that online medical services pose to your health.

15:53

EP186 - S5

22 Apr 24

Doctors Note: What you don't know could kill you

Today, we bring you the first part of our exclusive, three-part special investigation into the risky new frontier of Australia's healthcare system.   The Briefing's investigative team went undercover online to expose the risks Australia's government, medical regulators and doctors' groups are only now beginning to realise.  The investigation reveals how the crisis in Australia's GP practices has degraded the way healthcare being is done online - including by doctors working for one of this country’s biggest corporations.  In part one of Doctors Note - why patients around the country are vulnerable to a new kind of healthcare that has experts alarmed. Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Doctors Note: What you don't know could kill you

Today, we bring you the first part of our exclusive, three-part special investigation into the risky new frontier of Australia's healthcare system.   The Briefing's investigative team went undercover online to expose the risks Australia's government, medical regulators and doctors' groups are only now beginning to realise.  The investigation reveals how the crisis in Australia's GP practices has degraded the way healthcare being is done online - including by doctors working for one of this country’s biggest corporations.  In part one of Doctors Note - why patients around the country are vulnerable to a new kind of healthcare that has experts alarmed. Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

12:39

EP185 - S5

21 Apr 24

How Andreas Lundin survived Alone Australia and eating possum

Alone has been dubbed the most successful original commission in SBS history. The series is a reality show like never before, where 10 people get dropped into a remote environment completely alone to see who can survive for the longest. Andreas Lundin, a former model, personal trainer and hunter, was part of Australia's season two. In this chat with Tom Tilley, Andreas explains the strategy he used and what a possum tastes like. Send us your Weekend Briefing suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

How Andreas Lundin survived Alone Australia and eating possum

Alone has been dubbed the most successful original commission in SBS history. The series is a reality show like never before, where 10 people get dropped into a remote environment completely alone to see who can survive for the longest. Andreas Lundin, a former model, personal trainer and hunter, was part of Australia's season two. In this chat with Tom Tilley, Andreas explains the strategy he used and what a possum tastes like. Send us your Weekend Briefing suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

43:28

EP184 - S5

20 Apr 24

Esme Louise James is the kinkiest historian you'll ever meet

History is a lot of things. Fascinating, confronting, sometimes shameful, often brutal, and also incredibly kinky. Esme Louise James is a sex historian – her work explores the history of human sexuality – including hidden queer histories, plus kinks and fetishes throughout the ages. In this chat with Antoinette Lattouf, Esme reveals her favourite historical kinky and her TMI moments whilst working with her Mum. WEEKEND LIST WATCH- Esme Louise James TedX EAT- Glass noodle jar salads TRY- Clothes swap with friends TRY-Adult colouring books Send us your Weekend Briefing suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

Esme Louise James is the kinkiest historian you'll ever meet

History is a lot of things. Fascinating, confronting, sometimes shameful, often brutal, and also incredibly kinky. Esme Louise James is a sex historian – her work explores the history of human sexuality – including hidden queer histories, plus kinks and fetishes throughout the ages. In this chat with Antoinette Lattouf, Esme reveals her favourite historical kinky and her TMI moments whilst working with her Mum. WEEKEND LIST WATCH- Esme Louise James TedX EAT- Glass noodle jar salads TRY- Clothes swap with friends TRY-Adult colouring books Send us your Weekend Briefing suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

38:33

EP183 - S5

19 Apr 24

'Cicada-geddon' is about to sweep across America

This spring, up to 16 states across the US will see a natural phenomenon of spectacular proportions not seen in over 200 years, as an estimated trillion periodical cicadas emerge in the same season. While there are over 1,500 different species of cicada, only seven emerge as a brood every 7 years, 13 years or 17 years. Because these cycles are all prime numbers, it is incredibly rare that the different broods emerge during the same year. But 2024 is one of those years. The Briefing's Simon Beaton spoke with one of Australia's leading cicada experts, Lindsay Popple, to find out more about these strange insects, and what a trillion cicadas will mean for the US.

'Cicada-geddon' is about to sweep across America

This spring, up to 16 states across the US will see a natural phenomenon of spectacular proportions not seen in over 200 years, as an estimated trillion periodical cicadas emerge in the same season. While there are over 1,500 different species of cicada, only seven emerge as a brood every 7 years, 13 years or 17 years. Because these cycles are all prime numbers, it is incredibly rare that the different broods emerge during the same year. But 2024 is one of those years. The Briefing's Simon Beaton spoke with one of Australia's leading cicada experts, Lindsay Popple, to find out more about these strange insects, and what a trillion cicadas will mean for the US.

12:18

EP182 - S5

19 Apr 24

Could we be seeing the end of trial by jury? Higgins Judge weighs in

This week lawyers in New York are trying to pick the jury for Donald Trump’s trial. On the first day more than 50 potential jurors were dismissed, with many saying they couldn’t be impartial. In this episode of The Briefing we ask Chief Justice Lucy McCallum about the future of juries. Justice McCallum presided over the trial between Bruce Lehrmann and Brittany Higgins— that case ultimately had to be abandoned due to juror misconduct. Headlines: 16-year-old charged with terrorist act  Seven CEO James Warburton departs network Vape shops could be forced to close Cocaine mystery solved Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Could we be seeing the end of trial by jury? Higgins Judge weighs in

This week lawyers in New York are trying to pick the jury for Donald Trump’s trial. On the first day more than 50 potential jurors were dismissed, with many saying they couldn’t be impartial. In this episode of The Briefing we ask Chief Justice Lucy McCallum about the future of juries. Justice McCallum presided over the trial between Bruce Lehrmann and Brittany Higgins— that case ultimately had to be abandoned due to juror misconduct. Headlines: 16-year-old charged with terrorist act  Seven CEO James Warburton departs network Vape shops could be forced to close Cocaine mystery solved Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

20:35

EP181 - S5

18 Apr 24

After Bondi, here's what you should know about schizophrenia

Australia was shocked as a mass stabbing event unfolded at Sydney’s Westfield Bondi Junction shopping centre at the weekend. The centre reopened today for quiet reflection. Retail outlets did not open, trade will recommence tomorrow. The 40-year-old Queensland man Joel Cauchi, who was responsible for the attacks was diagnosed with schizophrenia as a teenager, and spent more than 20 years trying to navigate life while suffering from schizophrenia. In this episode of The Briefing, we’re joined by Professor Patrick McGorry, former Australian of the Year, and career advocate for the mentally ill, to try to learn exactly what schizophrenia is, and how families and loved ones of those who suffer from the condition live with the challenge of managing their loved ones’ lives.

After Bondi, here's what you should know about schizophrenia

Australia was shocked as a mass stabbing event unfolded at Sydney’s Westfield Bondi Junction shopping centre at the weekend. The centre reopened today for quiet reflection. Retail outlets did not open, trade will recommence tomorrow. The 40-year-old Queensland man Joel Cauchi, who was responsible for the attacks was diagnosed with schizophrenia as a teenager, and spent more than 20 years trying to navigate life while suffering from schizophrenia. In this episode of The Briefing, we’re joined by Professor Patrick McGorry, former Australian of the Year, and career advocate for the mentally ill, to try to learn exactly what schizophrenia is, and how families and loved ones of those who suffer from the condition live with the challenge of managing their loved ones’ lives.

12:35

EP180 - S5

18 Apr 24

Something in the water? The Boomer stare explained

The health issues associated with long-term lead poisoning are not secret and governments around the world have been making moves since the 1970s to limit our exposure to the element. But there’s a theory floating around that the damage has already been done and its impacts are being seen clearly on an entire generation – the Baby Boomers. The ‘Boomer stare’ is a trend that’s taken off on TikTok and today we’re going to find out if we really can blame lead for changing the personalities of a generation. Assistant Professor at Michigan State University Ted Schwaba is our guest on this episode of The Briefing to explain if the ‘Boomer stare’ is for real. Headlines: Bondi Junction to reopen for “community reflection” Father of alleged teenage attacker says he’s seen signs of “disobedience”  Communications minister pledges to fine X and Meta over hosting misinformation and disinformation Kaylee McKeown breaks record in the pool Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Something in the water? The Boomer stare explained

The health issues associated with long-term lead poisoning are not secret and governments around the world have been making moves since the 1970s to limit our exposure to the element. But there’s a theory floating around that the damage has already been done and its impacts are being seen clearly on an entire generation – the Baby Boomers. The ‘Boomer stare’ is a trend that’s taken off on TikTok and today we’re going to find out if we really can blame lead for changing the personalities of a generation. Assistant Professor at Michigan State University Ted Schwaba is our guest on this episode of The Briefing to explain if the ‘Boomer stare’ is for real. Headlines: Bondi Junction to reopen for “community reflection” Father of alleged teenage attacker says he’s seen signs of “disobedience”  Communications minister pledges to fine X and Meta over hosting misinformation and disinformation Kaylee McKeown breaks record in the pool Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

19:10

EP179 - S5

17 Apr 24

Behind the evil tech that DV offenders use to maintain control

Malware, spyware and stalkerware programs give unauthorised and undetected insight into another person’s device. All too often, they are used as an insidious tool for domestic violence offenders. Installed without consent or knowledge of the victim, the software gives the perpetrator control to track the user, read their messages, or even discreetly activate the phone's microphone or camera. In this episode, Bension Siebert speaks with cyber forensic expert, Rose MacDonald, to find out how victims can determine if their phones are bugged, and what needs to happen to better protect domestic violence survivors against technology-facilitated abuse. If you'd like to hear more about Rose's story and her work in digital forensics, check out her recent episode on Crime Insiders: FORENSICS. This episode contains references to intimate partner violence and coercive control. For support, dial 1800 RESPECT on 1800 737 732.

Behind the evil tech that DV offenders use to maintain control

Malware, spyware and stalkerware programs give unauthorised and undetected insight into another person’s device. All too often, they are used as an insidious tool for domestic violence offenders. Installed without consent or knowledge of the victim, the software gives the perpetrator control to track the user, read their messages, or even discreetly activate the phone's microphone or camera. In this episode, Bension Siebert speaks with cyber forensic expert, Rose MacDonald, to find out how victims can determine if their phones are bugged, and what needs to happen to better protect domestic violence survivors against technology-facilitated abuse. If you'd like to hear more about Rose's story and her work in digital forensics, check out her recent episode on Crime Insiders: FORENSICS. This episode contains references to intimate partner violence and coercive control. For support, dial 1800 RESPECT on 1800 737 732.

12:20

EP178 - S5

17 Apr 24

The significance of Iran's strike on Israel explained

Iran dropped 300 missiles and drones on Israeli territory over the weekend after an air strike on Iran’s consulate in Syria last week. Most were intercepted – as many as 99% according to Israel – but it is being deemed a watershed moment in the conflict. Professor Michael Humphrey from the University of Sydney joins the Briefing to explain the significance of the strike globally. Headlines: An update on Sydney’s stabbings A blow to Julian Assange’s bid to avoid extradition to the US Linda Reynolds to proceed with case against Brittany Higgins Supermarket bosses grilled at Senate inquiry  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

The significance of Iran's strike on Israel explained

Iran dropped 300 missiles and drones on Israeli territory over the weekend after an air strike on Iran’s consulate in Syria last week. Most were intercepted – as many as 99% according to Israel – but it is being deemed a watershed moment in the conflict. Professor Michael Humphrey from the University of Sydney joins the Briefing to explain the significance of the strike globally. Headlines: An update on Sydney’s stabbings A blow to Julian Assange’s bid to avoid extradition to the US Linda Reynolds to proceed with case against Brittany Higgins Supermarket bosses grilled at Senate inquiry  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

22:34

EP177 - S5

16 Apr 24

Why Gen Z needs a crash course in communication

The National Institute of Dramatic Art has launched a new course to help teach Gen Z how to be in an office environment after they came of age during the pandemic. The course called ‘Prologue’ was created off the back of research showing younger workers have a skills gap when it comes to offline interaction, like picking up a phone instead of sending an email or text.  In this episode of The Briefing, we speak with researcher Claire Madden about the skills Gen Z are apparently lacking, and how NIDA plans to teach them. 

Why Gen Z needs a crash course in communication

The National Institute of Dramatic Art has launched a new course to help teach Gen Z how to be in an office environment after they came of age during the pandemic. The course called ‘Prologue’ was created off the back of research showing younger workers have a skills gap when it comes to offline interaction, like picking up a phone instead of sending an email or text.  In this episode of The Briefing, we speak with researcher Claire Madden about the skills Gen Z are apparently lacking, and how NIDA plans to teach them. 

10:31

EP176 - S5

16 Apr 24

Sex work in 2024: Is the world’s oldest profession still worth it?

Sex work is often referred to as the world’s oldest profession, and our attitudes to it are rapidly evolving. The language around it has changed, and public figures from politicians to influencers are being more open about it than ever. The shame and stigma around the profession seems weaker now than even a few years ago. So, what does sex work look like in Australia in 2024? In this four-part series, The Briefing dives deeper into the profession, where it’s been and where it’s going. In our final part of the series, we speak with Nova Hawthorne, one of Australia’s most successful Only Fans creator, to get a peek behind the curtain of the online sex work industry. Headlines: Bishop injured in south west Sydney church stabbing Lehrmann could face rape trial after defamation loss  Trump’s hush money trial begins Alice Springs curfew ends this morning Peggy and Molly reunited Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Sex work in 2024: Is the world’s oldest profession still worth it?

Sex work is often referred to as the world’s oldest profession, and our attitudes to it are rapidly evolving. The language around it has changed, and public figures from politicians to influencers are being more open about it than ever. The shame and stigma around the profession seems weaker now than even a few years ago. So, what does sex work look like in Australia in 2024? In this four-part series, The Briefing dives deeper into the profession, where it’s been and where it’s going. In our final part of the series, we speak with Nova Hawthorne, one of Australia’s most successful Only Fans creator, to get a peek behind the curtain of the online sex work industry. Headlines: Bishop injured in south west Sydney church stabbing Lehrmann could face rape trial after defamation loss  Trump’s hush money trial begins Alice Springs curfew ends this morning Peggy and Molly reunited Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

24:04

EP175 - S5

15 Apr 24

Court finds Bruce Lehrmann raped Brittany Higgins in Parliament House

Bruce Lehrmann has lost his defamation trial against Lisa Wilkinson and Channel Ten. The court today found that, on the balance of probabilities, Lehrmann did rape Brittany Higgins at Parliament House in 2019.  The former Liberal Party staffer sued Channel Ten and Lisa Wilkinson over an interview in 2021, in which Brittany Higgins claimed she was raped by a colleague at Parliament House.  Lehrmann, who denies the allegations, says while he wasn’t named, he could have been identified.  Justice Michael Lee allowed the trial to be reopened last week to hear allegations the Seven Network paid for cocaine and sex workers for Lehrmann while trying to land an interview with him.  In this episode of the Briefing, we’re joined by Nine Newspaper’s Chief Investigative journalist Kate McClymont who was in court today to hear Justice Lee’s findings.  If you or anyone needs support following the details made public of this case, there are services available:  1800RESPECT: 1800 737 732 Lifeline: 13 11 14 Sexual Assault Counselling Australia: 1800 211 028  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Court finds Bruce Lehrmann raped Brittany Higgins in Parliament House

Bruce Lehrmann has lost his defamation trial against Lisa Wilkinson and Channel Ten. The court today found that, on the balance of probabilities, Lehrmann did rape Brittany Higgins at Parliament House in 2019.  The former Liberal Party staffer sued Channel Ten and Lisa Wilkinson over an interview in 2021, in which Brittany Higgins claimed she was raped by a colleague at Parliament House.  Lehrmann, who denies the allegations, says while he wasn’t named, he could have been identified.  Justice Michael Lee allowed the trial to be reopened last week to hear allegations the Seven Network paid for cocaine and sex workers for Lehrmann while trying to land an interview with him.  In this episode of the Briefing, we’re joined by Nine Newspaper’s Chief Investigative journalist Kate McClymont who was in court today to hear Justice Lee’s findings.  If you or anyone needs support following the details made public of this case, there are services available:  1800RESPECT: 1800 737 732 Lifeline: 13 11 14 Sexual Assault Counselling Australia: 1800 211 028  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

11:11

EP174 - S5

15 Apr 24

Bondi Junction: a nation mourns

Australia stood still on Saturday afternoon when news reports started to feature reports of a stabbing at the Westfield shopping centre at Bondi Junction in Sydney’s eastern suburbs.  We now know seven people died in the attacks – including the man responsible, 40-year-old Joel Cauchi from Queensland.  In this extra episode of The Briefing, we discuss what we know so far, what Queensland Police know of Cauchi, and what his possible motivation was.  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Bondi Junction: a nation mourns

Australia stood still on Saturday afternoon when news reports started to feature reports of a stabbing at the Westfield shopping centre at Bondi Junction in Sydney’s eastern suburbs.  We now know seven people died in the attacks – including the man responsible, 40-year-old Joel Cauchi from Queensland.  In this extra episode of The Briefing, we discuss what we know so far, what Queensland Police know of Cauchi, and what his possible motivation was.  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

14:51

EP173 - S5

14 Apr 24

Sex work in 2024: Can your boss stop your sex work side hustle

Sex work is often referred to as the world’s oldest profession, and our attitudes to it are rapidly evolving. The language around it has changed, and public figures from politicians to influencers are being more open about it than ever. The shame and stigma around the profession seems weaker now than even a few years ago. So, what does sex work look like in Australia in 2024? In this four-part series, The Briefing dives deeper into the profession, where it’s been and where it’s going. In part three, we speak with Georgie Purcell, a former sex worker and now MP, to find out about the stigma and difficulties that still exist for those who work in the industry. Headlines: Flags at half-mast for Bondi Junction today Lehrmann findings to be delivered today  Israel war cabinet authorised to respond to Iran air strikes  Joe Biden and Donald Trump urged to participate in televised debate by US news networks Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Sex work in 2024: Can your boss stop your sex work side hustle

Sex work is often referred to as the world’s oldest profession, and our attitudes to it are rapidly evolving. The language around it has changed, and public figures from politicians to influencers are being more open about it than ever. The shame and stigma around the profession seems weaker now than even a few years ago. So, what does sex work look like in Australia in 2024? In this four-part series, The Briefing dives deeper into the profession, where it’s been and where it’s going. In part three, we speak with Georgie Purcell, a former sex worker and now MP, to find out about the stigma and difficulties that still exist for those who work in the industry. Headlines: Flags at half-mast for Bondi Junction today Lehrmann findings to be delivered today  Israel war cabinet authorised to respond to Iran air strikes  Joe Biden and Donald Trump urged to participate in televised debate by US news networks Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

21:13

EP172 - S5

14 Apr 24

Meet the 16-year-old news anchor Leo Puglisi behind 6NEWSAU

Leo Puglisi is the 16 year old anchor-man who isn’t afraid of tackling the big dogs. When Leo was 11 years old he founded 6NEWS Australia which lead him to interviewing Prime Ministers, Ministers and Opposition leaders, including his infamous interview with Scott Morrison. In this chat with Tom Tilley, Leo explains his pet hate of people saying he is controlled by his parents and what being woke looks like in schools. Send us your Weekend Briefing suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

Meet the 16-year-old news anchor Leo Puglisi behind 6NEWSAU

Leo Puglisi is the 16 year old anchor-man who isn’t afraid of tackling the big dogs. When Leo was 11 years old he founded 6NEWS Australia which lead him to interviewing Prime Ministers, Ministers and Opposition leaders, including his infamous interview with Scott Morrison. In this chat with Tom Tilley, Leo explains his pet hate of people saying he is controlled by his parents and what being woke looks like in schools. Send us your Weekend Briefing suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

38:51

EP171 - S5

13 Apr 24

How Michael Shafar became the accidental Jewish rep of comedy

Is laughter the best medicine? Well comedian Michael Shafar might be able to help with that. He’s probably the only person who can make fun being Jewish, having cancer and his genitals in the same breath – and not only get away with it – but have the room in hysterics In this chat with Antoinette Lattouf, Michael explains why he isn’t afraid to tackle political topics in his shows and how he’s accidentally become the Jewish representative of comedy. WEEKEND LIST TRY- Don’t charge your phone in your bedroom WATCH - Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt TRY- BlendJet portable blender WATCH - Loot on Apple TV Send us your Weekend Briefing suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

How Michael Shafar became the accidental Jewish rep of comedy

Is laughter the best medicine? Well comedian Michael Shafar might be able to help with that. He’s probably the only person who can make fun being Jewish, having cancer and his genitals in the same breath – and not only get away with it – but have the room in hysterics In this chat with Antoinette Lattouf, Michael explains why he isn’t afraid to tackle political topics in his shows and how he’s accidentally become the Jewish representative of comedy. WEEKEND LIST TRY- Don’t charge your phone in your bedroom WATCH - Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt TRY- BlendJet portable blender WATCH - Loot on Apple TV Send us your Weekend Briefing suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

32:08

EP170 - S5

12 Apr 24

The textbook child star rebrand of JoJo Siwa

The rebranding of child stars as they transition into more mature identities is nothing new. After Britney Spears and Miley Cyrus, we're now seeing JoJo Siwa struggle as she does the same. Made famous from the reality TV series Dance Moms, she became known for a squeaky-clean aesthetic of bright colours, big hair bows and later, her pop hit 'Boomerang'. But now, she's wearing eccentric black outfits (complete with makeup) amid a much saucier vibe in her new release 'Karma'. So how did we get here, how is JoJo's rebrand different from the other former child stars that have come before her, and what can we expect for the future? On this episode of The Briefing, Sacha Barbour Gatt speaks with one of our producers, Helen Smith, to unpack the challenging journey of child stars when they shift to a more mature identity in the public eye.

The textbook child star rebrand of JoJo Siwa

The rebranding of child stars as they transition into more mature identities is nothing new. After Britney Spears and Miley Cyrus, we're now seeing JoJo Siwa struggle as she does the same. Made famous from the reality TV series Dance Moms, she became known for a squeaky-clean aesthetic of bright colours, big hair bows and later, her pop hit 'Boomerang'. But now, she's wearing eccentric black outfits (complete with makeup) amid a much saucier vibe in her new release 'Karma'. So how did we get here, how is JoJo's rebrand different from the other former child stars that have come before her, and what can we expect for the future? On this episode of The Briefing, Sacha Barbour Gatt speaks with one of our producers, Helen Smith, to unpack the challenging journey of child stars when they shift to a more mature identity in the public eye.

12:38

EP169 - S5

12 Apr 24

Why South Korean women are swearing off men

Have you heard of the 4B movement? It’s a feminist action that’s taking hold of South Korea. The movement follows the four B’s: no marriage, no sex with men, no child-rearing and no dating. In this episode of The Briefing Sacha Barbour Gatt speaks with Su-Kyoung Hwang from the University of Sydney about why Korean women are swearing off men. Headlines: OJ Simpson dies at the age of 76 School holiday strike avoided as airport fire fighters secure deal Vietnamese real estate tycoon sentenced to death over $19 billion fraud Three men rescued from remote island after spelling ‘HELP’ with palm fronds Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Why South Korean women are swearing off men

Have you heard of the 4B movement? It’s a feminist action that’s taking hold of South Korea. The movement follows the four B’s: no marriage, no sex with men, no child-rearing and no dating. In this episode of The Briefing Sacha Barbour Gatt speaks with Su-Kyoung Hwang from the University of Sydney about why Korean women are swearing off men. Headlines: OJ Simpson dies at the age of 76 School holiday strike avoided as airport fire fighters secure deal Vietnamese real estate tycoon sentenced to death over $19 billion fraud Three men rescued from remote island after spelling ‘HELP’ with palm fronds Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

19:47

EP168 - S5

11 Apr 24

Turns out we aren’t paying enough for our daily cup of coffee

Plenty of Australians have been cutting down on their daily coffee amid the cost-of-living crisis, but new research shows that cafe coffee in Australia is actually too cheap. In many cases rents, wages, specialty beans and milk are all getting more expensive, and that’s squeezing cafe owners. In this episode of The Briefing, Sacha Barbour Gatt speaks with Emma Felton from the University of South Australia to find out how much we should be paying for our daily cup of joe.

Turns out we aren’t paying enough for our daily cup of coffee

Plenty of Australians have been cutting down on their daily coffee amid the cost-of-living crisis, but new research shows that cafe coffee in Australia is actually too cheap. In many cases rents, wages, specialty beans and milk are all getting more expensive, and that’s squeezing cafe owners. In this episode of The Briefing, Sacha Barbour Gatt speaks with Emma Felton from the University of South Australia to find out how much we should be paying for our daily cup of joe.

10:54

EP167 - S5

11 Apr 24

Why QLD's new coercive control laws may not be enforced

QLD has introduced strict new coercive control laws. Coercive control has serious and traumatic impacts for a victim. It can be subtle and insidious, and individually targeted and tailored to a victim. Under new legislation announced in Queensland, the new standalone offence of coercive control will carry a maximum penalty of 14 years imprisonment. In today’s Briefing, Bension Siebert and LiSTNR journo Lizzie Vigar take a deep dive into Queensland’s new coercive control laws and why they may be very, very difficult to police. Headlines: Dutton on Palestinian statehood comments Joe Biden considering Australia’s request to drop charges against Julian Assange SA Police arrive in Alice Springs Molly the magpie to return home to best friend Peggy the dog Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Why QLD's new coercive control laws may not be enforced

QLD has introduced strict new coercive control laws. Coercive control has serious and traumatic impacts for a victim. It can be subtle and insidious, and individually targeted and tailored to a victim. Under new legislation announced in Queensland, the new standalone offence of coercive control will carry a maximum penalty of 14 years imprisonment. In today’s Briefing, Bension Siebert and LiSTNR journo Lizzie Vigar take a deep dive into Queensland’s new coercive control laws and why they may be very, very difficult to police. Headlines: Dutton on Palestinian statehood comments Joe Biden considering Australia’s request to drop charges against Julian Assange SA Police arrive in Alice Springs Molly the magpie to return home to best friend Peggy the dog Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

19:55

EP166 - S5

10 Apr 24

How the end of MONA's Ladies Lounge could still be part of the art

Tasmania’s MONA has been forced to allow men into its women’s only Ladies Lounge.   A NSW man who was upset when he was denied entry into the lounge, has taken the museum to the Tasmanian Civil Administrative Tribunal and won. This means MONA now has 28 days to stop refusing entry to men – or people who don’t identify as ladies.  In this episode, one of our producers, Helen Smith, speaks with Jahan Kalantar, a Sydney-based solicitor, university lecturer and entrepreneur who calls himself the “little guy lawyer”, to ask if the decision could lead to women being allowed into men's clubs that have been off limits to women for decades. 

How the end of MONA's Ladies Lounge could still be part of the art

Tasmania’s MONA has been forced to allow men into its women’s only Ladies Lounge.   A NSW man who was upset when he was denied entry into the lounge, has taken the museum to the Tasmanian Civil Administrative Tribunal and won. This means MONA now has 28 days to stop refusing entry to men – or people who don’t identify as ladies.  In this episode, one of our producers, Helen Smith, speaks with Jahan Kalantar, a Sydney-based solicitor, university lecturer and entrepreneur who calls himself the “little guy lawyer”, to ask if the decision could lead to women being allowed into men's clubs that have been off limits to women for decades. 

08:28

EP165 - S5

10 Apr 24

The Youth Curfew in Alice Springs has been extended, so is it working?

A few weeks ago, chaos erupted in the heart of Alice Springs, with unrest that saw buildings trashed, the doors of the local tavern kicked in, and a car set on fire. The Northern Territory Chief Minister Eva Lawler called an 'emergency situation', which resulted in around 80 additional police officers being redeployed into Alice Springs, and a youth curfew coming into effect from 6am to 6 pm in the town centre. Yesterday, we found out that while no arrests had so far been made in relation to the youth curfew, the conditions would stay in place for almost another week while the town tries to transition away from the violence and into longer- term strategies. In this episode, we speak with 18-year-old Armani Francois, a local Indigenous social youth case worker, to find out exactly how people in Alice Springs are feeling right now. Headlines: Australian government flags recognising Palestinian two-state solution ASIO warns right-wing extremists want a race war in Australia 2000 Swiss women sue their government for failure to act on climate change MONA ordered to let men into women-only exhibit Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

The Youth Curfew in Alice Springs has been extended, so is it working?

A few weeks ago, chaos erupted in the heart of Alice Springs, with unrest that saw buildings trashed, the doors of the local tavern kicked in, and a car set on fire. The Northern Territory Chief Minister Eva Lawler called an 'emergency situation', which resulted in around 80 additional police officers being redeployed into Alice Springs, and a youth curfew coming into effect from 6am to 6 pm in the town centre. Yesterday, we found out that while no arrests had so far been made in relation to the youth curfew, the conditions would stay in place for almost another week while the town tries to transition away from the violence and into longer- term strategies. In this episode, we speak with 18-year-old Armani Francois, a local Indigenous social youth case worker, to find out exactly how people in Alice Springs are feeling right now. Headlines: Australian government flags recognising Palestinian two-state solution ASIO warns right-wing extremists want a race war in Australia 2000 Swiss women sue their government for failure to act on climate change MONA ordered to let men into women-only exhibit Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

20:29

EP164 - S5

9 Apr 24

Is AUKUS about to become JAUKUS?

The federal government this morning announced that the AUKUS defence agreement partners (Australia, the United States and the UK) are considering expanding the group to include Japan. China has already issued a statement to say it is “gravely concerned” with news AUKUS is considering expanding.  So what does it mean for the Asia/Pacific region, and more specifically Australia?   In this episode of The Briefing, we’re joined by David Andrews, senior policy advisor at the ANU National Security College, to find out why Japan is seeking to join AUKUS and what it will prompt from China on the world stage. 

Is AUKUS about to become JAUKUS?

The federal government this morning announced that the AUKUS defence agreement partners (Australia, the United States and the UK) are considering expanding the group to include Japan. China has already issued a statement to say it is “gravely concerned” with news AUKUS is considering expanding.  So what does it mean for the Asia/Pacific region, and more specifically Australia?   In this episode of The Briefing, we’re joined by David Andrews, senior policy advisor at the ANU National Security College, to find out why Japan is seeking to join AUKUS and what it will prompt from China on the world stage. 

10:53

EP163 - S5

9 Apr 24

Why the new flu jab is a game changer

A new flu vaccine has arrived in Australia and it’s not like traditional vaccines – it's cell-based. Cell-based flu vaccines are developed differently from the traditional egg-based vaccines – and they offer advantages in production, scale and better matching viruses in our vaccines to those actually circulating in the community. In this episode of the Briefing, immunologist Dr Julianne Bayliss explains why the new vaccine is a game-changer for Australians and why you need to get the new flu jab. Headlines: Date set for Rafah invasion: Netanyahu Donald Trump stops short of calling for a national abortion ban New poll finds more Aussies would back radical housing policies Total solar eclipse observed across North America Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Why the new flu jab is a game changer

A new flu vaccine has arrived in Australia and it’s not like traditional vaccines – it's cell-based. Cell-based flu vaccines are developed differently from the traditional egg-based vaccines – and they offer advantages in production, scale and better matching viruses in our vaccines to those actually circulating in the community. In this episode of the Briefing, immunologist Dr Julianne Bayliss explains why the new vaccine is a game-changer for Australians and why you need to get the new flu jab. Headlines: Date set for Rafah invasion: Netanyahu Donald Trump stops short of calling for a national abortion ban New poll finds more Aussies would back radical housing policies Total solar eclipse observed across North America Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

21:12

EP162 - S5

8 Apr 24

Rhys Nicholson on RuPaul’s Drag Race & why redheads have more fun

Hey Briefers. An apology: this interview was scheduled to be released on Saturday morning, but due to a technical glitch it didn't, so it's appearing in your feed today instead. Sincere apologies to our wonderful host Antoinette and to her fabulous guest Rhys Nicholson - we hope you enjoy catching up.  Rhys Nicholson is a judge on RuPaul’s Drag race, a much-loved comedian and believes they have a very muggable face. They have a successful career in comedy, presenting and the arts, but Rhys lives with chronic anxiety. In this chat with Antoinette Lattouf, Rhys breaks down the number of times they’ve been mugged and why redheads have more fun. WEEKEND LIST WATCH - Gilmore Girls READ - Down the drain by Julia Fox DO - YouTube workouts by Sydney Cummings Houdyshell LISTEN - Sounds Like a Cult Send us your Weekend Briefing suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

Rhys Nicholson on RuPaul’s Drag Race & why redheads have more fun

Hey Briefers. An apology: this interview was scheduled to be released on Saturday morning, but due to a technical glitch it didn't, so it's appearing in your feed today instead. Sincere apologies to our wonderful host Antoinette and to her fabulous guest Rhys Nicholson - we hope you enjoy catching up.  Rhys Nicholson is a judge on RuPaul’s Drag race, a much-loved comedian and believes they have a very muggable face. They have a successful career in comedy, presenting and the arts, but Rhys lives with chronic anxiety. In this chat with Antoinette Lattouf, Rhys breaks down the number of times they’ve been mugged and why redheads have more fun. WEEKEND LIST WATCH - Gilmore Girls READ - Down the drain by Julia Fox DO - YouTube workouts by Sydney Cummings Houdyshell LISTEN - Sounds Like a Cult Send us your Weekend Briefing suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

42:01

EP161 - S5

8 Apr 24

Sex work in 2024: How the internet has changed the industry

Sex work is often referred to as the world’s oldest profession, and our attitudes to it are rapidly evolving.   The language around it has changed, and public figures from politicians to influencers are being more open than ever. The shame and stigma around the profession seem weaker now than even a few years ago.  So, what does sex work look like in Australia in 2024? In this four-part series, The Briefing dives deeper into the profession, where it’s been and where it’s going.  In part two, we speak with a former sex worker and now-brothel owner about how the internet has revolutionised the industry.  To hear part one about the history and regulations of sex work in Australia, click here.

Sex work in 2024: How the internet has changed the industry

Sex work is often referred to as the world’s oldest profession, and our attitudes to it are rapidly evolving.   The language around it has changed, and public figures from politicians to influencers are being more open than ever. The shame and stigma around the profession seem weaker now than even a few years ago.  So, what does sex work look like in Australia in 2024? In this four-part series, The Briefing dives deeper into the profession, where it’s been and where it’s going.  In part two, we speak with a former sex worker and now-brothel owner about how the internet has revolutionised the industry.  To hear part one about the history and regulations of sex work in Australia, click here.

12:57

EP160 - S5

8 Apr 24

Sex work in 2024: how did we get here?

Sex work is often referred to as the world's oldest profession and our attitudes to it are rapidly evolving. The language around it has changed, and public figures from politicians to influencers are being more open about it than ever. The shame and stigma around the profession seems weaker now than even a few years ago. So, what does sex work look like in Australia in 2024? In this four-part series, The Briefing dives deeper into the profession, where it's been and where it's going. In part one, we're looking back and asking: how did we get here? Headlines: Interim report into supermarkets recommends massive fines Israeli troops withdraw from southern Gaza PM defends his border security record as missing asylum seeker found NSW pill testing pilot starts today Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Sex work in 2024: how did we get here?

Sex work is often referred to as the world's oldest profession and our attitudes to it are rapidly evolving. The language around it has changed, and public figures from politicians to influencers are being more open about it than ever. The shame and stigma around the profession seems weaker now than even a few years ago. So, what does sex work look like in Australia in 2024? In this four-part series, The Briefing dives deeper into the profession, where it's been and where it's going. In part one, we're looking back and asking: how did we get here? Headlines: Interim report into supermarkets recommends massive fines Israeli troops withdraw from southern Gaza PM defends his border security record as missing asylum seeker found NSW pill testing pilot starts today Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

20:48

EP159 - S5

7 Apr 24

How YouTubers Boy Boy snuck into a CIA base without getting arrested

Imagine going to North Korea to get a haircut or breaking into a military base, well YouTubers Alex Apollonov and Aleksa Vulovic did just that. The guys are behind the YouTube channel Boy Boy, with content that clocks up millions of views and boasts almost a million subscribers. In this chat with Tom Tilley, Alex and Aleksa explain what it’s like working with Friendlyjordies and their close calls with the police. Send us your Weekend Briefing suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

How YouTubers Boy Boy snuck into a CIA base without getting arrested

Imagine going to North Korea to get a haircut or breaking into a military base, well YouTubers Alex Apollonov and Aleksa Vulovic did just that. The guys are behind the YouTube channel Boy Boy, with content that clocks up millions of views and boasts almost a million subscribers. In this chat with Tom Tilley, Alex and Aleksa explain what it’s like working with Friendlyjordies and their close calls with the police. Send us your Weekend Briefing suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

34:37

EP158 - S5

6 Apr 24

The Quiet on Set documentary is about to ruin your childhood nostalgia

A new documentary exposing the dark underbelly of kid’s television in the nineties and early 2000s is dropping in Australia today.   Quiet on Set details shocking accusations of what it was like for child stars working on some of the biggest television shows when many of us were growing up. In particular, it presents harsh allegations against one of Nickelodeon’s most prized producers and screenwriters – Dan Schneider.  LiSTNR’s Justin Hill, entertainment reporter and host of The Streaming Service joins The Briefing’s Sacha Barbour-Gatt, to take us through the revelations in the documentary, and why it’s already received so much attention worldwide.  This episode discussed child sexual abuse and mental health. If you are struggling, or need help, call Lifeline now on 13 11 14.

The Quiet on Set documentary is about to ruin your childhood nostalgia

A new documentary exposing the dark underbelly of kid’s television in the nineties and early 2000s is dropping in Australia today.   Quiet on Set details shocking accusations of what it was like for child stars working on some of the biggest television shows when many of us were growing up. In particular, it presents harsh allegations against one of Nickelodeon’s most prized producers and screenwriters – Dan Schneider.  LiSTNR’s Justin Hill, entertainment reporter and host of The Streaming Service joins The Briefing’s Sacha Barbour-Gatt, to take us through the revelations in the documentary, and why it’s already received so much attention worldwide.  This episode discussed child sexual abuse and mental health. If you are struggling, or need help, call Lifeline now on 13 11 14.

12:46

EP157 - S5

5 Apr 24

Could Australia become a dumping ground for nuclear waste?

Australia could be taking on nuclear waste from the AUKUS submarine deal after new laws tabled in Parliament last year. The legislation says it would allow for the creation of facilities for "managing, storing or disposing of radioactive waste from an AUKUS submarine". It's led to the resurfacing of talk about nuclear waste; asking if we'd be taking on waste from the UK and US, and in terms of our own, where would it go? In this episode of The Briefing, Sacha Barbour Gatt is speaking with Tony Irwin about what these laws mean. Headlines: Taylor Auerbach cross examination to continue after bombshell claims in court Calls grow for independent inquiry into killing of aid workers in Gaza Wild weather to lash NSW and Queensland Study warns all people in Japan could have the same last name in 500 years Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Could Australia become a dumping ground for nuclear waste?

Australia could be taking on nuclear waste from the AUKUS submarine deal after new laws tabled in Parliament last year. The legislation says it would allow for the creation of facilities for "managing, storing or disposing of radioactive waste from an AUKUS submarine". It's led to the resurfacing of talk about nuclear waste; asking if we'd be taking on waste from the UK and US, and in terms of our own, where would it go? In this episode of The Briefing, Sacha Barbour Gatt is speaking with Tony Irwin about what these laws mean. Headlines: Taylor Auerbach cross examination to continue after bombshell claims in court Calls grow for independent inquiry into killing of aid workers in Gaza Wild weather to lash NSW and Queensland Study warns all people in Japan could have the same last name in 500 years Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

21:29

EP156 - S5

4 Apr 24

The long road for those suffering with long covid

It's been over four years since COVID-19 first shook the world. And though vaccines have allowed many of us to move on with our lives, a large number of people are not recovering from the virus. In fact, scientists believe at least 65 million people worldwide have, or have had, long covid.  A recent study from WA found about 20 per cent of people infected during one of the state’s COVID waves still had fatigue, memory loss and trouble with concentration, three months after they first became sick.  On this episode of The Briefing, Sacha Barbour Gatt speaks with Dr Margaret Van Heekeren, a university lecturer and mother of two, whose life has been turned upside down after she contracted long covid.

The long road for those suffering with long covid

It's been over four years since COVID-19 first shook the world. And though vaccines have allowed many of us to move on with our lives, a large number of people are not recovering from the virus. In fact, scientists believe at least 65 million people worldwide have, or have had, long covid.  A recent study from WA found about 20 per cent of people infected during one of the state’s COVID waves still had fatigue, memory loss and trouble with concentration, three months after they first became sick.  On this episode of The Briefing, Sacha Barbour Gatt speaks with Dr Margaret Van Heekeren, a university lecturer and mother of two, whose life has been turned upside down after she contracted long covid.

11:25

EP155 - S5

4 Apr 24

What is the National Autism Strategy and why does Australia need one?

Earlier this week the Federal Government released a draft of the National Autism Strategy, in the hopes to improve the lives of autistic Australians. The development of the strategy was first announced back in 2022 and covers key reform areas including access to services, healthcare, education, and employment. Will it change the lives of people with autism? In this episode of The Briefing, we're joined by Professor Cheryl Dissanayake, a leading autism researcher at La Trobe University to find out what the strategy means for people with autism in Australia. Headlines: Former heads of World Central Kitchen question strike that killed aid workers Rescue efforts continue in Taiwan after earthquake Brittany Higgins and Linda Reynolds mediation talks collapse Magpie and staffy besties a step closer to being reunited Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

What is the National Autism Strategy and why does Australia need one?

Earlier this week the Federal Government released a draft of the National Autism Strategy, in the hopes to improve the lives of autistic Australians. The development of the strategy was first announced back in 2022 and covers key reform areas including access to services, healthcare, education, and employment. Will it change the lives of people with autism? In this episode of The Briefing, we're joined by Professor Cheryl Dissanayake, a leading autism researcher at La Trobe University to find out what the strategy means for people with autism in Australia. Headlines: Former heads of World Central Kitchen question strike that killed aid workers Rescue efforts continue in Taiwan after earthquake Brittany Higgins and Linda Reynolds mediation talks collapse Magpie and staffy besties a step closer to being reunited Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

21:52

EP154 - S5

3 Apr 24

Could aid relief in Gaza halt after the death of innocent aid workers?

Seven aid workers for the World Central Kitchen, including Australian Zomi Frankcom, are confirmed to have been killed in an Israeli airstrike in Gaza. Since news of the attack broke, Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese has spoken with his Israeli counterpart Benjamin Netanyahu, conveying the country’s outrage over the death. The Israeli government says it will investigate how the deaths occurred.  One of Australia's leading voices on humanitarian aid and the former head of World Vision Australia, Reverend Tim Costello, says he is devastated by the news, and that he hopes this will be a turning point in the conflict. But will already limited aid in the conflict come to a halt after this death? He joins The Briefing's Bension Siebert to discuss.

Could aid relief in Gaza halt after the death of innocent aid workers?

Seven aid workers for the World Central Kitchen, including Australian Zomi Frankcom, are confirmed to have been killed in an Israeli airstrike in Gaza. Since news of the attack broke, Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese has spoken with his Israeli counterpart Benjamin Netanyahu, conveying the country’s outrage over the death. The Israeli government says it will investigate how the deaths occurred.  One of Australia's leading voices on humanitarian aid and the former head of World Vision Australia, Reverend Tim Costello, says he is devastated by the news, and that he hopes this will be a turning point in the conflict. But will already limited aid in the conflict come to a halt after this death? He joins The Briefing's Bension Siebert to discuss.

11:52

EP153 - S5

3 Apr 24

What the Armaguard crisis tells us about the future of cash

Armaguard, the cash delivery business, is going broke. No one uses cash anymore so the nation's number one cash-in-transit business is losing money. What does the collapse of Armaguard mean for Australia's cash flow? Most consumers use tap-and-go to pay for goods and services, and it means businesses like big supermarket chains simply don't have cash reserves like they used to. In this episode of The Briefing, we investigate what the Armaguard crisis tells us about the future of cash, what Australia would look like if we go cash-less and what is the future of cash in Australia? Headlines: Albanese demands meeting with Netanyahu over aid killings in Gaza Channel Ten wins bid to reopen Bruce Lehrmann defamation trial NASA investigating after chunk of metal from ISS rips through Florida home Taylor Swift is listed on the billionaire rich list for the first time Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

What the Armaguard crisis tells us about the future of cash

Armaguard, the cash delivery business, is going broke. No one uses cash anymore so the nation's number one cash-in-transit business is losing money. What does the collapse of Armaguard mean for Australia's cash flow? Most consumers use tap-and-go to pay for goods and services, and it means businesses like big supermarket chains simply don't have cash reserves like they used to. In this episode of The Briefing, we investigate what the Armaguard crisis tells us about the future of cash, what Australia would look like if we go cash-less and what is the future of cash in Australia? Headlines: Albanese demands meeting with Netanyahu over aid killings in Gaza Channel Ten wins bid to reopen Bruce Lehrmann defamation trial NASA investigating after chunk of metal from ISS rips through Florida home Taylor Swift is listed on the billionaire rich list for the first time Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

20:57

EP152 - S5

2 Apr 24

Behind the first successful pig-to-human kidney transplant

Late last month, Richard Slayman became the first person in history to successfully undergo an organ transplantation of a genetically modified pig kidney. While human-to-animal transplant, or xenotransplantation, isn't new (heart valves from horses, cows and pigs having been used for over 30 years), cases of entire organ transplants are incredibly complex, while raising a host of other ethical and health concerns. So how significant is the recent pig kidney transplant, where are we at with this science, and could this one day be our go-to solution for those in desperate need of an organ transplant? To explain the science of xenotransplantation, Bension Siebert is joined by Wayne Hawthorne, professor of transplantation at the University of Sydney.

Behind the first successful pig-to-human kidney transplant

Late last month, Richard Slayman became the first person in history to successfully undergo an organ transplantation of a genetically modified pig kidney. While human-to-animal transplant, or xenotransplantation, isn't new (heart valves from horses, cows and pigs having been used for over 30 years), cases of entire organ transplants are incredibly complex, while raising a host of other ethical and health concerns. So how significant is the recent pig kidney transplant, where are we at with this science, and could this one day be our go-to solution for those in desperate need of an organ transplant? To explain the science of xenotransplantation, Bension Siebert is joined by Wayne Hawthorne, professor of transplantation at the University of Sydney.

12:36

EP151 - S5

2 Apr 24

Is this the end of Reddit as we know it?

Reddit has gone public, making its debut on the New York stock exchange. Its value made it over $9b. Reddit is one of the world’s most popular websites, with 73 million unique active visitors a day—and can engage in over 100,000 forums. Going public could majorly change the platform though, with everything from ads through to how Reddit forums are moderated likely to be put under the microscope. In this episode of The Briefing, Sacha Barbour Gatt sits down with James Hennessy to find out what this IPO means for the future of the website. Headlines: Australia could become a dumping ground for nuclear waste under AUKUS deal IDF ends 14-day Al Shifa Hospital siege in Gaza amid protests in Israel against Netanyahu New evidence could be heard in Lehrmann defamation case Round up of the best April Fool's pranks Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Is this the end of Reddit as we know it?

Reddit has gone public, making its debut on the New York stock exchange. Its value made it over $9b. Reddit is one of the world’s most popular websites, with 73 million unique active visitors a day—and can engage in over 100,000 forums. Going public could majorly change the platform though, with everything from ads through to how Reddit forums are moderated likely to be put under the microscope. In this episode of The Briefing, Sacha Barbour Gatt sits down with James Hennessy to find out what this IPO means for the future of the website. Headlines: Australia could become a dumping ground for nuclear waste under AUKUS deal IDF ends 14-day Al Shifa Hospital siege in Gaza amid protests in Israel against Netanyahu New evidence could be heard in Lehrmann defamation case Round up of the best April Fool's pranks Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

22:47

EP150 - S5

1 Apr 24

How Black artists like Beyoncé are reclaiming country music

Though Beyoncé has claimed that Cowboy Carter is a 'Beyoncé album', rather than 'a country album', it's a release that definitely dips into the genre. And country music has a complex relationship with Black musicians - a few years back, Lil Nas X faced a heavy backlash from Old Town Road, which was scrapped from Billboard's country chart, triggering criticism that the reason was in part racially motivated. Yet over the last few years, country has seen a massive boom in its widespread popularity, with many large-name artists delving into the sound. So what can we expect next, and why is it significant that Black artists are making music in the space? In this episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert speaks with LiSTNR journalist Loren Howarth to find out.

How Black artists like Beyoncé are reclaiming country music

Though Beyoncé has claimed that Cowboy Carter is a 'Beyoncé album', rather than 'a country album', it's a release that definitely dips into the genre. And country music has a complex relationship with Black musicians - a few years back, Lil Nas X faced a heavy backlash from Old Town Road, which was scrapped from Billboard's country chart, triggering criticism that the reason was in part racially motivated. Yet over the last few years, country has seen a massive boom in its widespread popularity, with many large-name artists delving into the sound. So what can we expect next, and why is it significant that Black artists are making music in the space? In this episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert speaks with LiSTNR journalist Loren Howarth to find out.

10:52

EP149 - S5

1 Apr 24

Inbox Zero or Inbox 7,568? How you should manage your emails

Do you have thousands of emails in your inbox, or are you an Inbox Zero type of person? A new study is looking at personal email management, and has found only half of people are happy with how they deal with their inbox. In this episode of The Briefing, Sacha Barbour Gatt talks to Matt Balogh from the University of New England about what we should be doing with our emails.  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Inbox Zero or Inbox 7,568? How you should manage your emails

Do you have thousands of emails in your inbox, or are you an Inbox Zero type of person? A new study is looking at personal email management, and has found only half of people are happy with how they deal with their inbox. In this episode of The Briefing, Sacha Barbour Gatt talks to Matt Balogh from the University of New England about what we should be doing with our emails.  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

12:48

EP148 - S5

31 Mar 24

Why Tom Ballard is so angry at politicians

Tom Ballard is possibly the most political comedian in Australia, with his stand up tackling issues including asylum seekers, racism, the monarchy and capitalism. His new show, Good Point Well Made, is no different. He reflects on Australia's failed voice referendum and Donald Trump- alongside a healthy dose of toilet humour. In this chat with Tom Tilley, Ballard opens up about the process of writing the show, why he loves performing, and the rise of fellow comedian and friend Hannah Gadsby. Send us your Weekend Briefing suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

Why Tom Ballard is so angry at politicians

Tom Ballard is possibly the most political comedian in Australia, with his stand up tackling issues including asylum seekers, racism, the monarchy and capitalism. His new show, Good Point Well Made, is no different. He reflects on Australia's failed voice referendum and Donald Trump- alongside a healthy dose of toilet humour. In this chat with Tom Tilley, Ballard opens up about the process of writing the show, why he loves performing, and the rise of fellow comedian and friend Hannah Gadsby. Send us your Weekend Briefing suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

44:09

EP147 - S5

29 Mar 24

Radio Queen Emma Chow on balancing Mike E, the mic & motherhood

Emma Chow is one half of the 14-years strong radio duo Mike E & Emma- broadcasting live every weekday nationally for their breakfast show. Emma has achieved radio queen status with her radio husband but admits that there have TMI moments throughout her career. In this chat with Antoinette Lattouf, Emma reminisces about having one of the most unique gender reveals on air- and then copping slack for returning to work weeks after giving birth. You can hear Emma on Mike E & Emma live 6-9am Nationally on RnB Fridays Radio as well as 9am-11am on 2DayFM in Sydney! WEEKEND LIST Challengers movie Beyond Utopia documentary McoBeauty eyebrow gel House of Gods on ABC iview Send us your Weekend Briefing suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

Radio Queen Emma Chow on balancing Mike E, the mic & motherhood

Emma Chow is one half of the 14-years strong radio duo Mike E & Emma- broadcasting live every weekday nationally for their breakfast show. Emma has achieved radio queen status with her radio husband but admits that there have TMI moments throughout her career. In this chat with Antoinette Lattouf, Emma reminisces about having one of the most unique gender reveals on air- and then copping slack for returning to work weeks after giving birth. You can hear Emma on Mike E & Emma live 6-9am Nationally on RnB Fridays Radio as well as 9am-11am on 2DayFM in Sydney! WEEKEND LIST Challengers movie Beyond Utopia documentary McoBeauty eyebrow gel House of Gods on ABC iview Send us your Weekend Briefing suggestions on Instagram at @thebriefingpodcast!

31:04

EP146 - S5

29 Mar 24

It’s only March – why am I already exhausted?

Everyone’s hustling, everyone’s struggling with cost of living pressures, rents are rising, interest rates are rising. We’re exhausted, and it’s only March.  We’re constantly told to look after our mental health and to support those around us who need love and care – family and friends.  But how can we, when we’re at the point of burnout almost every day.  In this special episode of The Briefing brought to you by Medibank, our hosts Sacha Barbour Gatt and Bension Siebert talk about why they’re feeling burnt out and what they do about it.  You’ll also hear some awesome stories about ordinary people doing extraordinary things and practical ways to improve your overall wellbeing. 

It’s only March – why am I already exhausted?

Everyone’s hustling, everyone’s struggling with cost of living pressures, rents are rising, interest rates are rising. We’re exhausted, and it’s only March.  We’re constantly told to look after our mental health and to support those around us who need love and care – family and friends.  But how can we, when we’re at the point of burnout almost every day.  In this special episode of The Briefing brought to you by Medibank, our hosts Sacha Barbour Gatt and Bension Siebert talk about why they’re feeling burnt out and what they do about it.  You’ll also hear some awesome stories about ordinary people doing extraordinary things and practical ways to improve your overall wellbeing. 

14:11

EP145 - S5

29 Mar 24

How chocolate has helped bring bilbies back from the brink

Once upon a time bilbies lived all over Australia; where there was desert, there was a bilby. After the introduction of cats and foxes, the bilby’s numbers plummeted, in the 80s they were only found in a couple of tiny patches in the wild. Now their numbers are up and growing, and partly that’s thanks to the idea of the easter bilby. Chocolate bilbies appeared in shops in the 90s as an environmental alternative to the easter bunny, the idea has raised awareness and funds. In this episode of The Briefing we find out how bilbies have come back from the brink.  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

How chocolate has helped bring bilbies back from the brink

Once upon a time bilbies lived all over Australia; where there was desert, there was a bilby. After the introduction of cats and foxes, the bilby’s numbers plummeted, in the 80s they were only found in a couple of tiny patches in the wild. Now their numbers are up and growing, and partly that’s thanks to the idea of the easter bilby. Chocolate bilbies appeared in shops in the 90s as an environmental alternative to the easter bunny, the idea has raised awareness and funds. In this episode of The Briefing we find out how bilbies have come back from the brink.  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

15:11

EP144 - S5

28 Mar 24

The truth about how ticketing for concerts works in Australia

Right now, Moshtix is in the process of refunding all of the tickets for the Splendour in the Grass festival, after the unexpected news that the event had been cancelled.  Though we've seen many festivals across the country postpone or cancel their events, we've also lately seen several big concerts, with a massive demand for tickets.   Often, it feels like no matter how quick you are to get onto the website, whether you actually get a ticket seems pretty random. But is it?   What is actually happening in the background when we log in? Who decides who gets a ticket and why and they so goddamn expensive?    On this episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert speaks with LiSTNR journalist Tessa Randello, to find out why we need to look closer at Australia’s ticketing industry. 

The truth about how ticketing for concerts works in Australia

Right now, Moshtix is in the process of refunding all of the tickets for the Splendour in the Grass festival, after the unexpected news that the event had been cancelled.  Though we've seen many festivals across the country postpone or cancel their events, we've also lately seen several big concerts, with a massive demand for tickets.   Often, it feels like no matter how quick you are to get onto the website, whether you actually get a ticket seems pretty random. But is it?   What is actually happening in the background when we log in? Who decides who gets a ticket and why and they so goddamn expensive?    On this episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert speaks with LiSTNR journalist Tessa Randello, to find out why we need to look closer at Australia’s ticketing industry. 

13:10

EP143 - S5

28 Mar 24

Why Splendour is the latest in a long line of cancelled Aussie music festivals

Splendour in the Grass will not go ahead this year, and we are yet to learn the official reason. This isn’t the first time the event has been hit with difficulties. In 2022 the first day of Splendour was cancelled due to flooding, and last year saw the event far from selling out, with ticket sales down 30%.  In this episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert spoke with Swinburne’s Event Management and Public Relations expert, Associate Professor Robert Gill to find out what his take was, and what the future could hold for Australia’s large music festival industry.  Headlines: Entire countries could be blacklisted under Labor’s deportation bill Cargo ship’s black box recovered in Baltimore disaster A billion meals go to waste everyday as people go hungry Thailand to legalise same sex marriage Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Why Splendour is the latest in a long line of cancelled Aussie music festivals

Splendour in the Grass will not go ahead this year, and we are yet to learn the official reason. This isn’t the first time the event has been hit with difficulties. In 2022 the first day of Splendour was cancelled due to flooding, and last year saw the event far from selling out, with ticket sales down 30%.  In this episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert spoke with Swinburne’s Event Management and Public Relations expert, Associate Professor Robert Gill to find out what his take was, and what the future could hold for Australia’s large music festival industry.  Headlines: Entire countries could be blacklisted under Labor’s deportation bill Cargo ship’s black box recovered in Baltimore disaster A billion meals go to waste everyday as people go hungry Thailand to legalise same sex marriage Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

20:49

EP142 - S5

27 Mar 24

An Australian engineer explains the Baltimore bridge disaster

About 1:30AM local time, the Francis Scott Key Bridge in the US city of Baltimore collapsed after being struck by a container ship. The loaded ship reportedly suffered a power issue just prior to the incident, alerting a mayday just in time to stop traffic from crossing the bridge. Tragically, eight roadworkers were still working on the bridge at the time of the collapse. Two were rescued, one body has been recovered, while searches for the remaining have been suspended until morning. Authorities have said they are presumed dead. On this episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert speaks with the Chair of the Insititute of Structural Engineers, Colin Caprani, about why the bridge collapsed, and whether the same could happen here in Australia.

An Australian engineer explains the Baltimore bridge disaster

About 1:30AM local time, the Francis Scott Key Bridge in the US city of Baltimore collapsed after being struck by a container ship. The loaded ship reportedly suffered a power issue just prior to the incident, alerting a mayday just in time to stop traffic from crossing the bridge. Tragically, eight roadworkers were still working on the bridge at the time of the collapse. Two were rescued, one body has been recovered, while searches for the remaining have been suspended until morning. Authorities have said they are presumed dead. On this episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert speaks with the Chair of the Insititute of Structural Engineers, Colin Caprani, about why the bridge collapsed, and whether the same could happen here in Australia.

11:15

EP141 - S5

27 Mar 24

Who is Kristi Noam, Trump's likely running mate

Donald Trump and Joe Biden have now secured their respective parties’ presidential nomination for the November US presidential election. Biden will partner with Vice President Kamala Harris for the second election in succession. But who will be Donald Trump’s running mate? Most pundits are pointing to South Dakota governor Kristi Noam. So who is she? And why is Donald Trump keeping his cards so close to his chest before naming his running mate? Headlines: Julian Assange granted legal lifeline Search underway in icy conditions after Baltimore bridge collapse  Australia could move to holding federal elections every four years The iconic floating door from Titanic film sells at auction Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Who is Kristi Noam, Trump's likely running mate

Donald Trump and Joe Biden have now secured their respective parties’ presidential nomination for the November US presidential election. Biden will partner with Vice President Kamala Harris for the second election in succession. But who will be Donald Trump’s running mate? Most pundits are pointing to South Dakota governor Kristi Noam. So who is she? And why is Donald Trump keeping his cards so close to his chest before naming his running mate? Headlines: Julian Assange granted legal lifeline Search underway in icy conditions after Baltimore bridge collapse  Australia could move to holding federal elections every four years The iconic floating door from Titanic film sells at auction Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

20:42

EP140 - S5

26 Mar 24

Computer chips inside your brain are now possible. Here's how it works

Noland Arbaugh was paralysed from the shoulders down after a diving accident eight years ago. But now, thanks to a brain computer interface chip, he's able to play video games like Mario Kart or virtual chess simply by concentrating his mind on the screen. The chip, which is the size of a coin, was surgically implanted back in January by Elon Musk's company, Neuralink. While the company have said there are still a few problems to work through, it is incredible technology that promises to give people with severe disabilities a much better quality of life. So how does this technology work, and is it as incredible as it appears?  On this episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert is joined by neural engineering expert, Associate Professor Sam John to explain how this works, the ethical dilemmas and how common it could be in the future.

Computer chips inside your brain are now possible. Here's how it works

Noland Arbaugh was paralysed from the shoulders down after a diving accident eight years ago. But now, thanks to a brain computer interface chip, he's able to play video games like Mario Kart or virtual chess simply by concentrating his mind on the screen. The chip, which is the size of a coin, was surgically implanted back in January by Elon Musk's company, Neuralink. While the company have said there are still a few problems to work through, it is incredible technology that promises to give people with severe disabilities a much better quality of life. So how does this technology work, and is it as incredible as it appears?  On this episode of The Briefing, Bension Siebert is joined by neural engineering expert, Associate Professor Sam John to explain how this works, the ethical dilemmas and how common it could be in the future.

11:36

EP139 - S5

26 Mar 24

What is ISIS-K and why has it targeted Russia?

Russia has suffered its deadliest terror attack in 20 years, after 133 people were killed and 100 were injured when gunmen opened fire at a theatre in Moscow. Russia’s president, Vladimir Putin, fresh from his election win has blamed Ukraine for the attack despite a terrorist group called ISIS-K claiming responsibility. In this episode of The Briefing Bension Siebert speaks to terrorism expert Greg Barton from Deakin university about what’s going on. Headlines: UN has called for a ceasefire in Gaza for the first time Trump’s fraud bond reduced Boeing CEO steps down Rebel Wilson names Sacha Baron Cohen "massive arsehole" Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

What is ISIS-K and why has it targeted Russia?

Russia has suffered its deadliest terror attack in 20 years, after 133 people were killed and 100 were injured when gunmen opened fire at a theatre in Moscow. Russia’s president, Vladimir Putin, fresh from his election win has blamed Ukraine for the attack despite a terrorist group called ISIS-K claiming responsibility. In this episode of The Briefing Bension Siebert speaks to terrorism expert Greg Barton from Deakin university about what’s going on. Headlines: UN has called for a ceasefire in Gaza for the first time Trump’s fraud bond reduced Boeing CEO steps down Rebel Wilson names Sacha Baron Cohen "massive arsehole" Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

20:40

EP138 - S5

25 Mar 24

This is why Tasmania's election was important

The results from Tasmania's election, which took place over the weekend, are mostly in. While Liberal Premier Jeremy Rockliff called the election a year early in the hopes of forming a stable majority government, he hasn't been able to secure the outcome he was hoping for. It's expected that the Liberals will hold 13-15 seats, which is more than Labor... But short of the 18 required to form a majority government. So what will this mean for Tasmania's future, and the controversial policies that have divided the island? And could this be a preview of how our next federal election could unfold? To explain what's happened, and what it means, Bension Siebert is joined by LiSTNR journalist, Tessa Randello.

This is why Tasmania's election was important

The results from Tasmania's election, which took place over the weekend, are mostly in. While Liberal Premier Jeremy Rockliff called the election a year early in the hopes of forming a stable majority government, he hasn't been able to secure the outcome he was hoping for. It's expected that the Liberals will hold 13-15 seats, which is more than Labor... But short of the 18 required to form a majority government. So what will this mean for Tasmania's future, and the controversial policies that have divided the island? And could this be a preview of how our next federal election could unfold? To explain what's happened, and what it means, Bension Siebert is joined by LiSTNR journalist, Tessa Randello.

10:56

EP137 - S5

25 Mar 24

Why are we making weapons for the US?

Did you know Australia has been recruited by America to produce some of its weapons? The wars in Ukraine and Gaza have stretched US capabilities to make things like artillery shells and missiles, so it’s taking advantage of our munitions factories that have room to grow. On today’s episode of The Briefing, Sacha Barbour Gatt speaks with Charles Edel from the Center for Strategic and International Studies about where the weapons being made in Australia are ending up and the geopolitical impacts of buying and selling devices made to kill people. Headlines: Day of mourning declared in Russia after terror attack  Labor concedes defeat in Tasmanian election  Royal spokesperson urges public to give Kate and William space Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Why are we making weapons for the US?

Did you know Australia has been recruited by America to produce some of its weapons? The wars in Ukraine and Gaza have stretched US capabilities to make things like artillery shells and missiles, so it’s taking advantage of our munitions factories that have room to grow. On today’s episode of The Briefing, Sacha Barbour Gatt speaks with Charles Edel from the Center for Strategic and International Studies about where the weapons being made in Australia are ending up and the geopolitical impacts of buying and selling devices made to kill people. Headlines: Day of mourning declared in Russia after terror attack  Labor concedes defeat in Tasmanian election  Royal spokesperson urges public to give Kate and William space Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

20:49

EP136 - S5

24 Mar 24

Dr Zac Seidler on toxic masculinity and dealing with grief

Dr Zac Seidler is a clinical psychologist, researcher and leading men’s mental health expert. With seven men across Australia dying by suicide every day- globally, an average of one man every minute- it’s his mission to create a dialogue with men, not about them, in the mental health space. In this chat with Tom Tilley, Zac opens up about how his father’s suicide shaped his career, explains why we should ditch the label “toxic masculinity”- and why men need more friends. If you are in need of help, call LIFELINE now on 13 11 14.

Dr Zac Seidler on toxic masculinity and dealing with grief

Dr Zac Seidler is a clinical psychologist, researcher and leading men’s mental health expert. With seven men across Australia dying by suicide every day- globally, an average of one man every minute- it’s his mission to create a dialogue with men, not about them, in the mental health space. In this chat with Tom Tilley, Zac opens up about how his father’s suicide shaped his career, explains why we should ditch the label “toxic masculinity”- and why men need more friends. If you are in need of help, call LIFELINE now on 13 11 14.

39:54

EP135 - S5

23 Mar 24

Reuben Kaye on why trauma makes you funny

Reuben Kaye is what happens when you tell your children they can be anything. In this chat with Antoinette Lattouf, Reuben recalls the moment he discovered he was funny, opens up about finding humour in dark places- and explains why he stands by that controversial joke about Jesus he told on The Project last year. You can catch Reuben’s show Apocalipstik and his signature huge eyelashes at the Melbourne Comedy festival from next weekend, before he heads to Canberra, Sydney and Brisbane. WEEKEND LIST Late Night with the Devil One Day on Netflix 1Q84 The Imperfects Podcast- Social Anxiety

Reuben Kaye on why trauma makes you funny

Reuben Kaye is what happens when you tell your children they can be anything. In this chat with Antoinette Lattouf, Reuben recalls the moment he discovered he was funny, opens up about finding humour in dark places- and explains why he stands by that controversial joke about Jesus he told on The Project last year. You can catch Reuben’s show Apocalipstik and his signature huge eyelashes at the Melbourne Comedy festival from next weekend, before he heads to Canberra, Sydney and Brisbane. WEEKEND LIST Late Night with the Devil One Day on Netflix 1Q84 The Imperfects Podcast- Social Anxiety

25:27

EP134 - S5

22 Mar 24

Why politicians are always trying to build new stadiums

Why are politicians so desperate for the sport vote?   As Tasmania head into an election this weekend, one of the major talking points surrounds whether they really should be about to build a new AFL stadium. And this isn't the first time we've seen governments wrestle with the politics of stadia, with other states and territories similarly finding themselves similarly under fire over proposals and upgrades. So why are politicians so desperate to spend so much money on stadiums, that will only ever be used by a very small percentage of voters? Or should all states and territories have these facilities? On this episode of The Briefing, Sacha Barbour Gatt sits down with Dr Hunter Fujak, a lecturer in Sport Management at Deakin University to find out more.

Why politicians are always trying to build new stadiums

Why are politicians so desperate for the sport vote?   As Tasmania head into an election this weekend, one of the major talking points surrounds whether they really should be about to build a new AFL stadium. And this isn't the first time we've seen governments wrestle with the politics of stadia, with other states and territories similarly finding themselves similarly under fire over proposals and upgrades. So why are politicians so desperate to spend so much money on stadiums, that will only ever be used by a very small percentage of voters? Or should all states and territories have these facilities? On this episode of The Briefing, Sacha Barbour Gatt sits down with Dr Hunter Fujak, a lecturer in Sport Management at Deakin University to find out more.

12:25

EP133 - S5

22 Mar 24

Why Leonardo DiCaprio wants Tasmanians to vote Green

Tasmania goes to the polls this weekend, and one of the major issues people will be voting on is whether to log or not to log the state’s forests. The coalition, who have been in power for a decade say they will ramp up the logging of Tasmania's native forests, Labor has said they will extend logging contracts to 2040, while the Greens are the only party wanting to get rid of native logging altogether. In this episode of The Briefing Sacha Barbour Gatt talks about what’s at stake this weekend with Bob Brown, and what does Leonardo DiCaprio have to do with it? Headlines: US files landmark lawsuit against Apple  Jobs surge puts doubt on rate cut Man plays chess with his mind thanks to brain chip Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Why Leonardo DiCaprio wants Tasmanians to vote Green

Tasmania goes to the polls this weekend, and one of the major issues people will be voting on is whether to log or not to log the state’s forests. The coalition, who have been in power for a decade say they will ramp up the logging of Tasmania's native forests, Labor has said they will extend logging contracts to 2040, while the Greens are the only party wanting to get rid of native logging altogether. In this episode of The Briefing Sacha Barbour Gatt talks about what’s at stake this weekend with Bob Brown, and what does Leonardo DiCaprio have to do with it? Headlines: US files landmark lawsuit against Apple  Jobs surge puts doubt on rate cut Man plays chess with his mind thanks to brain chip Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

22:15

EP132 - S5

21 Mar 24

Is Boeing an airplane manufacturer in crisis?

There's been a lot of attention on Boeing recently, after a spate of inflight incidents.  In January, a Boeing 737 Max on a flight from Portland to Ontario in California had its emergency door plug blow off mid-flight, while in February, pilots reported a Boeing 737 Max having jammed flight controls as the plane landed in New Jersey. And just last week, the LATAM 787 Boeing Dreamliner, flying from Sydney to New Zealand plunged midflight, injuring 50 people.  After so many well-publicised safety incidents, should we still trust a Boeing plane? Or is this an overblown crisis in an industry otherwise renowned for its extremely high safety standards?  One of our producers, Simon Beaton, spoke with the Head of Aviation at Central Queensland University, Professor Doug Drury, to find out what's going on.

Is Boeing an airplane manufacturer in crisis?

There's been a lot of attention on Boeing recently, after a spate of inflight incidents.  In January, a Boeing 737 Max on a flight from Portland to Ontario in California had its emergency door plug blow off mid-flight, while in February, pilots reported a Boeing 737 Max having jammed flight controls as the plane landed in New Jersey. And just last week, the LATAM 787 Boeing Dreamliner, flying from Sydney to New Zealand plunged midflight, injuring 50 people.  After so many well-publicised safety incidents, should we still trust a Boeing plane? Or is this an overblown crisis in an industry otherwise renowned for its extremely high safety standards?  One of our producers, Simon Beaton, spoke with the Head of Aviation at Central Queensland University, Professor Doug Drury, to find out what's going on.

10:58

EP131 - S5

21 Mar 24

Harmony Day's racist roots

Today is Harmony Day when Australia celebrates its multiculturism and diversity, but did you know we’re the only country who does? It’s because Australia has a difficult relationship with what the day is actually for internationally, which is the UN International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. In this episode of The Briefing Sacha Barbour Gatt delves into Australia’s murky past with Listnr investigative journalist Claudianna Blanco to find out why this is such a controversial day. Headlines: Kevin Rudd to remain as US ambassador after Trump comments  Celebrities looking to include Rupert Murdoch in lawsuit against his papers Affordable housing now out of reach in all Australian eastern capitals Australia ranks 10 in the world for happiness  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Harmony Day's racist roots

Today is Harmony Day when Australia celebrates its multiculturism and diversity, but did you know we’re the only country who does? It’s because Australia has a difficult relationship with what the day is actually for internationally, which is the UN International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. In this episode of The Briefing Sacha Barbour Gatt delves into Australia’s murky past with Listnr investigative journalist Claudianna Blanco to find out why this is such a controversial day. Headlines: Kevin Rudd to remain as US ambassador after Trump comments  Celebrities looking to include Rupert Murdoch in lawsuit against his papers Affordable housing now out of reach in all Australian eastern capitals Australia ranks 10 in the world for happiness  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

23:21

EP130 - S5

20 Mar 24


Season 4



Season 3



Season 2



Season 1



Episodes


Listnr

Download the app to get the full experience

Get a fully curated daily feed based on your favourites, access to curated collections, preview every show, and much more.

Get it on Google Play
Download on the App Store
Get it on Google Play
Download on the App Store

You might also like