The Briefing

The Briefing

Australia’s fastest growing daily news podcast, The Briefing serves up the latest news headlines and a deep dive into a topic affecting you. All in under 20 minutes. Hosted by Tom Tilley and co-hosts Jan Fran, Katrina Blowers, Antoinette

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Season 3


Are lab-grown diamonds a girl's best friend?

What are lab-grown diamonds, and why are they becoming so popular? Lab-grown diamonds are becoming increasingly popular, with a recent survey showing nearly 70% of millennials are happy to consider them for an engagement ring.  We’re joined by Jodi Bradby, professor at the Research School of Physics and Engineering at the Australian National University; and Ronnie Bauer from the Jewellers Association of Australia. In today’s Briefing, lab-grown diamonds are chemically, physically and optically identical to mined diamonds, so how are they made, and are they more sustainable than traditional diamonds? Headlines: - Interest rate pain in lead-up to Christmas - National Cabinet to meet Friday to discuss energy price caps - Indonesia bans sex outside of marriage - Watermelon prices skyrocket Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Are lab-grown diamonds a girl's best friend?

What are lab-grown diamonds, and why are they becoming so popular? Lab-grown diamonds are becoming increasingly popular, with a recent survey showing nearly 70% of millennials are happy to consider them for an engagement ring.  We’re joined by Jodi Bradby, professor at the Research School of Physics and Engineering at the Australian National University; and Ronnie Bauer from the Jewellers Association of Australia. In today’s Briefing, lab-grown diamonds are chemically, physically and optically identical to mined diamonds, so how are they made, and are they more sustainable than traditional diamonds? Headlines: - Interest rate pain in lead-up to Christmas - National Cabinet to meet Friday to discuss energy price caps - Indonesia bans sex outside of marriage - Watermelon prices skyrocket Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

22:49

EP287 - S3

6 Dec 22

North Korea’s tween successor

Why has North Korean leader Kim Jong-un decided to reveal his daughter to the world now?  Kim Jong-un has revealed North Korea plans to build the “world’s most powerful nuclear force” after testing out a new ballistic missile. He’s also revealed his daughter to the public for the first time ever. So why has the North Korean leader chosen to unveil her to the world now?  In this episode of the Briefing we’re speaking to Gordon Flake, founding CEO of the Perth USAsia Centre at The University of Western Australia.  We explore North Korea’s nuclear plans and the significance of Kim Jong-un revealing his daughter. Headlines: - Albo tests positive for Covid-19 - RBA expected to increase rates today - Hillsong founder Houston returns to court today - China criticises Australian delegation to Taiwan - Heatwave heading to northern Australia Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

North Korea’s tween successor

Why has North Korean leader Kim Jong-un decided to reveal his daughter to the world now?  Kim Jong-un has revealed North Korea plans to build the “world’s most powerful nuclear force” after testing out a new ballistic missile. He’s also revealed his daughter to the public for the first time ever. So why has the North Korean leader chosen to unveil her to the world now?  In this episode of the Briefing we’re speaking to Gordon Flake, founding CEO of the Perth USAsia Centre at The University of Western Australia.  We explore North Korea’s nuclear plans and the significance of Kim Jong-un revealing his daughter. Headlines: - Albo tests positive for Covid-19 - RBA expected to increase rates today - Hillsong founder Houston returns to court today - China criticises Australian delegation to Taiwan - Heatwave heading to northern Australia Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

19:22

EP286 - S3

5 Dec 22

WA’s Banksia Hill’s shameful treatment of detainees

What is it like for youngsters locked up inside Western Australia’s Banksia Hill detention centre?   We’re joined by the ABC reporter Grace Tobin, whose distressing Four Corners report has revealed the number of excessive force complaints against officers at Banksia Hill. Officers have been exposed for using the ‘folding up’ technique to restrain teenagers. The movement is banned in Queensland over fears it could lead to suffocation or death.  In this episode of the Briefing, WA’s Banksia Hill’s shameful treatment of detainees - many of whom are children Headlines: - Feds push for cap on energy prices - Albo finishes year on top of the polls - Iran to scrap morality police  - Alleged ISIS terrorist Prakash facing six charges  - Shane Warne elevated to legend status at Australian Sport Hall of Fame Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

WA’s Banksia Hill’s shameful treatment of detainees

What is it like for youngsters locked up inside Western Australia’s Banksia Hill detention centre?   We’re joined by the ABC reporter Grace Tobin, whose distressing Four Corners report has revealed the number of excessive force complaints against officers at Banksia Hill. Officers have been exposed for using the ‘folding up’ technique to restrain teenagers. The movement is banned in Queensland over fears it could lead to suffocation or death.  In this episode of the Briefing, WA’s Banksia Hill’s shameful treatment of detainees - many of whom are children Headlines: - Feds push for cap on energy prices - Albo finishes year on top of the polls - Iran to scrap morality police  - Alleged ISIS terrorist Prakash facing six charges  - Shane Warne elevated to legend status at Australian Sport Hall of Fame Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

20:52

EP285 - S3

4 Dec 22

The Choice: Violence or Poverty with Dr Anne Summers

Dr Anne Summers is one of Australia's greatest contributors to the feminist movement.  She is a writer, speaker and author, who was editor of the American publication Ms magazine in the 1980s and editor of the Good Weekend here in Australia in the 1990s. In between those roles she advised Prime Ministers Hawke and Keating on women's issues and went on to run the Office for the Status of Women, in Canberra. Her most recent work is about the link between family violence and women’s poverty.   To read the full report on The Choice: Violence or Poverty by Anne Summers, click the link here: https://www.violenceorpoverty.com/ In this conversation Jamila Rizvi explores the life of Anne Summers, and the pair dissect the confronting figures on the correlation of violence and poverty experienced by women in Australia.  THE WEEKEND LIST WATCH: Wednesday - Netflix  WATCH: From Lone Wolf to Leader: The Making of Anthony Albanese – The Guardian DO:  Wear sunscreen people! EAT: Gingerbread house recipe – Sally’s Baking Addiction   Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

The Choice: Violence or Poverty with Dr Anne Summers

Dr Anne Summers is one of Australia's greatest contributors to the feminist movement.  She is a writer, speaker and author, who was editor of the American publication Ms magazine in the 1980s and editor of the Good Weekend here in Australia in the 1990s. In between those roles she advised Prime Ministers Hawke and Keating on women's issues and went on to run the Office for the Status of Women, in Canberra. Her most recent work is about the link between family violence and women’s poverty.   To read the full report on The Choice: Violence or Poverty by Anne Summers, click the link here: https://www.violenceorpoverty.com/ In this conversation Jamila Rizvi explores the life of Anne Summers, and the pair dissect the confronting figures on the correlation of violence and poverty experienced by women in Australia.  THE WEEKEND LIST WATCH: Wednesday - Netflix  WATCH: From Lone Wolf to Leader: The Making of Anthony Albanese – The Guardian DO:  Wear sunscreen people! EAT: Gingerbread house recipe – Sally’s Baking Addiction   Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

27:15

EP284 - S3

2 Dec 22

Isaiah Firebrace: teaching kids about our First Peoples

You may know Isaiah Firebrace from the X Factor or Eurovision.  Well he’s written a new children’s book - Come Together - things every kid should know about our First Peoples Isaiah joins Rhianna to explain the book is a heart-warming, debut picture book for children aged 5 and up, inspired by Isaiah’s petition to the Australian Government calling for Aboriginal history to be taught in every classroom.   Come Together will make every Aussie kid proud that we are home to the longest continuing culture on Earth!  The book is available now. Headlines: - Chris Dawson to be sentenced today - Territories given go-ahead to debate voluntary dying laws - Meghan and Harry’s Netflix trailer drops - Socceroos to face Argentina early Sunday Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Isaiah Firebrace: teaching kids about our First Peoples

You may know Isaiah Firebrace from the X Factor or Eurovision.  Well he’s written a new children’s book - Come Together - things every kid should know about our First Peoples Isaiah joins Rhianna to explain the book is a heart-warming, debut picture book for children aged 5 and up, inspired by Isaiah’s petition to the Australian Government calling for Aboriginal history to be taught in every classroom.   Come Together will make every Aussie kid proud that we are home to the longest continuing culture on Earth!  The book is available now. Headlines: - Chris Dawson to be sentenced today - Territories given go-ahead to debate voluntary dying laws - Meghan and Harry’s Netflix trailer drops - Socceroos to face Argentina early Sunday Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

20:26

EP283 - S3

1 Dec 22

Inside China’s Covid protests

The Chinese government introduced its ‘zero-Covid’ policy back in 2019 when the virus was first detected. So why are protesters choosing to demonstrate against it almost three years later? We’re joined by author and Senior Fellow for East Asia at the Lowy Institute Richard McGregor, to discuss the ‘White Paper protests’ and how the Chinese authorities are attempting to mute them. In this episode of the Briefing we explore how protestors in China are using creative methods to stand up against the country’s strict Covid measures. Headlines: - Socceroos WIN!!  Australia through to Round of 16  - Former PM Morrison censured by Parliament - First day of summer after miserable spring - Inflation decline potentially good news for interest rates  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Inside China’s Covid protests

The Chinese government introduced its ‘zero-Covid’ policy back in 2019 when the virus was first detected. So why are protesters choosing to demonstrate against it almost three years later? We’re joined by author and Senior Fellow for East Asia at the Lowy Institute Richard McGregor, to discuss the ‘White Paper protests’ and how the Chinese authorities are attempting to mute them. In this episode of the Briefing we explore how protestors in China are using creative methods to stand up against the country’s strict Covid measures. Headlines: - Socceroos WIN!!  Australia through to Round of 16  - Former PM Morrison censured by Parliament - First day of summer after miserable spring - Inflation decline potentially good news for interest rates  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

18:06

EP282 - S3

30 Nov 22

Freezing eggs and buying time - why are more women choosing IVF?

Why is it becoming more common for women to freeze their eggs?  A couple in the US has just welcomed twins into the world using embryos made 30 years ago. The twins have been named the ‘oldest babies’ to be born after the eggs were kept in ice for 3 decades.  We’re joined by Molly Johnston, a bioethics lecturer at Monash University and she’s been working in the IVF field for the last five years to find out if this is something that could happen in Australia. In this episode of the Briefing we explore the growing popularity of women choosing to freeze their eggs and have babies at a later stage in life. Headlines: -New national anti-corruption commission to become law today  - Nationals split over Indigenous Voice - NSW Covid fines scrapped - Outback Wrangler charged over chopper crash Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Freezing eggs and buying time - why are more women choosing IVF?

Why is it becoming more common for women to freeze their eggs?  A couple in the US has just welcomed twins into the world using embryos made 30 years ago. The twins have been named the ‘oldest babies’ to be born after the eggs were kept in ice for 3 decades.  We’re joined by Molly Johnston, a bioethics lecturer at Monash University and she’s been working in the IVF field for the last five years to find out if this is something that could happen in Australia. In this episode of the Briefing we explore the growing popularity of women choosing to freeze their eggs and have babies at a later stage in life. Headlines: -New national anti-corruption commission to become law today  - Nationals split over Indigenous Voice - NSW Covid fines scrapped - Outback Wrangler charged over chopper crash Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

21:29

EP281 - S3

29 Nov 22

Put down the phone: your right to disconnect

Should employers respect a worker’s right to disconnect? The age of mobile phones and the internet means we’re connected more than ever. We’re basically available 24/7. Should workers retain the right to disconnect once their work day is done? A growing movement, called 'right to disconnect' is urging employers to respect a worker’s right to their own downtime.  We’re joined by a Queensland teacher and Greens Senator Barbara Pocock. Before she was elected earlier this year, she was worked at the University of South Austrlalia and wrote several books on work/life balance. In this episode of the Briefing we explore the growing movement to enable staff to say ‘enough’s enough’ and to turn off their phones in their own time. Headlines: - Nationals will not support Indigenous Voice  - $50m fines for companies over data breaches - RBA boss apologises for wrong advice  - Australia’s terror threat reduced - WHO renames monkeypox over racism concerns Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Put down the phone: your right to disconnect

Should employers respect a worker’s right to disconnect? The age of mobile phones and the internet means we’re connected more than ever. We’re basically available 24/7. Should workers retain the right to disconnect once their work day is done? A growing movement, called 'right to disconnect' is urging employers to respect a worker’s right to their own downtime.  We’re joined by a Queensland teacher and Greens Senator Barbara Pocock. Before she was elected earlier this year, she was worked at the University of South Austrlalia and wrote several books on work/life balance. In this episode of the Briefing we explore the growing movement to enable staff to say ‘enough’s enough’ and to turn off their phones in their own time. Headlines: - Nationals will not support Indigenous Voice  - $50m fines for companies over data breaches - RBA boss apologises for wrong advice  - Australia’s terror threat reduced - WHO renames monkeypox over racism concerns Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

22:32

EP280 - S3

28 Nov 22

Why finding a psychologist seems impossible

So many of us have developed mental health problems in the wake of the pandemic.  The federal government currently has a program where you can see a GP and the doctor will refer you to a psychologist for 20 help sessions, but the government is planning on winding that back to ten sessions by the end of the year.  To add to the problem it’s virtually impossible to find a psychologist who will take on new patients.   We’re joined by Sahra O’Doherty – a practicing psychologist and director of the Australian Association of Psychologists – who explains why it’s so tough to find a psych and why the government should keep its current policy of 20 sessions in place.   In today’s Briefing, a deep dive on why it’s so difficult to find a psychologist – and why it’s really important to persevere if your GP recommends you seek help.  If you need someone to talk to, call Lifeline on 13 11 14. Headlines: - New IR laws get green light - Andrews' resounding election win - China protests over Covid restrictions - Toyah Cordingly accused arrested in India - Cam Smith wins third Australian PGA Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Why finding a psychologist seems impossible

So many of us have developed mental health problems in the wake of the pandemic.  The federal government currently has a program where you can see a GP and the doctor will refer you to a psychologist for 20 help sessions, but the government is planning on winding that back to ten sessions by the end of the year.  To add to the problem it’s virtually impossible to find a psychologist who will take on new patients.   We’re joined by Sahra O’Doherty – a practicing psychologist and director of the Australian Association of Psychologists – who explains why it’s so tough to find a psych and why the government should keep its current policy of 20 sessions in place.   In today’s Briefing, a deep dive on why it’s so difficult to find a psychologist – and why it’s really important to persevere if your GP recommends you seek help.  If you need someone to talk to, call Lifeline on 13 11 14. Headlines: - New IR laws get green light - Andrews' resounding election win - China protests over Covid restrictions - Toyah Cordingly accused arrested in India - Cam Smith wins third Australian PGA Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

24:10

EP279 - S3

27 Nov 22

Angela White is the "Meryl Streep" of porn.

Angela White is Australia's most successful porn star.  Angela knew she wanted to work in porn from the age of fourteen. She saw the industry as a place where her sexuality and her love of sex would be celebrated, not stigmatised. Today, Angela is one of the biggest adult entertainers in the world, with her own empire. The Daily Beast describes her as the "Meryl Streep of porn".  In this conversation Jamila Rizvi and Angela White talk about everything from politics, education, shame around sex and the ins and outs of the pornography industry.  THE WEEKEND LIST WATCH: STUTZ - Netflix Documentary  WATCH: The White Lotus - BINGE  WATCH: Dead To Me (Season 3) - Netflix GET: Sticks Pinot Noir - Yarra Valley Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Angela White is the "Meryl Streep" of porn.

Angela White is Australia's most successful porn star.  Angela knew she wanted to work in porn from the age of fourteen. She saw the industry as a place where her sexuality and her love of sex would be celebrated, not stigmatised. Today, Angela is one of the biggest adult entertainers in the world, with her own empire. The Daily Beast describes her as the "Meryl Streep of porn".  In this conversation Jamila Rizvi and Angela White talk about everything from politics, education, shame around sex and the ins and outs of the pornography industry.  THE WEEKEND LIST WATCH: STUTZ - Netflix Documentary  WATCH: The White Lotus - BINGE  WATCH: Dead To Me (Season 3) - Netflix GET: Sticks Pinot Noir - Yarra Valley Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

32:37

EP278 - S3

25 Nov 22

Crypto-meltdown: The story of Sam Bankman-Fried

Cryptocurrency is having a year from hell.  And it’s been a massive fall - the market capitalisation of the crypto market has fallen from around $US3 trillion last year to around $US 800 billion.  As part of the fall, one of the world’s most famous crypto cowboys came down to earth. Sam Bankman-Fried, the founder of crypto exchange FTX We’re joined by Paul Vigna, a reporter at the Wall Street Journal... he’s written a book called The Age of Cryptocurrency.  Paul explains who SBF is, and how he had such a spectacular fall. In this episode of the Briefing, we look at the rise and fall of the crypto cowboy, Sam Bankman-Fried Headlines: - Baker Boy’s big night at the ARIAs - Tracy Grimshaw bids farewell to A Current Affair - Vic polls point to possible hung parliament - Nude shoot for Bondi Beach Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Crypto-meltdown: The story of Sam Bankman-Fried

Cryptocurrency is having a year from hell.  And it’s been a massive fall - the market capitalisation of the crypto market has fallen from around $US3 trillion last year to around $US 800 billion.  As part of the fall, one of the world’s most famous crypto cowboys came down to earth. Sam Bankman-Fried, the founder of crypto exchange FTX We’re joined by Paul Vigna, a reporter at the Wall Street Journal... he’s written a book called The Age of Cryptocurrency.  Paul explains who SBF is, and how he had such a spectacular fall. In this episode of the Briefing, we look at the rise and fall of the crypto cowboy, Sam Bankman-Fried Headlines: - Baker Boy’s big night at the ARIAs - Tracy Grimshaw bids farewell to A Current Affair - Vic polls point to possible hung parliament - Nude shoot for Bondi Beach Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

23:00

EP277 - S3

24 Nov 22

Why China took Australia out of the diplomatic deep freezer

Chinese president Xi Jinping met with Australia’s prime minister Anthony Albanese last week.  It was a first step in a bid to mend relations between the two countries.  China blocked Australian imports of wine, barley, live seafood and beef - among others - in 2020 in response to Australia’s criticism of China in the wake of the pandemic.   We’re joined by Joanna Chiu - a Vancouver-based journalist for the Toronto Star and the author of 'China Unbound - a new world disorder’ to discover why China has taken Australia out of the diplomatic deep freeze. So what’s behind China’s bid to welcome us back into the fold?  Is it simply a change of government? Or is China playing a long game? Headlines: - NSW town evacuated as Lachlan River floods  - Seven dead in Walmart shooting in US  - Teenager killed in Jerusalem terror attack  - Scotland blocked from holding second independence vote  - Japan stuns Germany in World Cup upset Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Why China took Australia out of the diplomatic deep freezer

Chinese president Xi Jinping met with Australia’s prime minister Anthony Albanese last week.  It was a first step in a bid to mend relations between the two countries.  China blocked Australian imports of wine, barley, live seafood and beef - among others - in 2020 in response to Australia’s criticism of China in the wake of the pandemic.   We’re joined by Joanna Chiu - a Vancouver-based journalist for the Toronto Star and the author of 'China Unbound - a new world disorder’ to discover why China has taken Australia out of the diplomatic deep freeze. So what’s behind China’s bid to welcome us back into the fold?  Is it simply a change of government? Or is China playing a long game? Headlines: - NSW town evacuated as Lachlan River floods  - Seven dead in Walmart shooting in US  - Teenager killed in Jerusalem terror attack  - Scotland blocked from holding second independence vote  - Japan stuns Germany in World Cup upset Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

19:41

EP276 - S3

23 Nov 22

QLD Police Service's toxic culture

We look at the results of an inquiry into sexism in the Queensland Police Service. In May, QLD Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk announced an independent Commission of Inquiry into Queensland Police Service responses to domestic and family violence.    We’re joined by Kate Kyriacou, a senior journalist at Brisbane’s Courier Mail newspaper.  Kate has followed the hearings since day one and says the inquiry heard women had been raped, kissed, touched inappropriately, threatened and stalked online and in person by senior colleagues.   In today’s Briefing we dissect the inquiry’s findings and ask a simple question – can the culture in the QLD Police Service change under its current leadership? Headlines: -RBA boss warns of higher inflation, lower growth  - Saudi Arabia stuns Argentina at FIFA World Cup   - Helliar announces Project departure   - Indo quake death toll reaches 268  - Caddick artworks sold at auction Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

QLD Police Service's toxic culture

We look at the results of an inquiry into sexism in the Queensland Police Service. In May, QLD Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk announced an independent Commission of Inquiry into Queensland Police Service responses to domestic and family violence.    We’re joined by Kate Kyriacou, a senior journalist at Brisbane’s Courier Mail newspaper.  Kate has followed the hearings since day one and says the inquiry heard women had been raped, kissed, touched inappropriately, threatened and stalked online and in person by senior colleagues.   In today’s Briefing we dissect the inquiry’s findings and ask a simple question – can the culture in the QLD Police Service change under its current leadership? Headlines: -RBA boss warns of higher inflation, lower growth  - Saudi Arabia stuns Argentina at FIFA World Cup   - Helliar announces Project departure   - Indo quake death toll reaches 268  - Caddick artworks sold at auction Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

17:05

EP275 - S3

22 Nov 22

Kylie Moore-Gilbert: Why Iranian protests are going into a third month

Protests against Iran's clerical establishment erupted two months ago after the death in custody of Mahsa Amini, a 22-year-old woman who was detained by morality police for allegedly breaking the strict hijab rules.   We’re joined by Dr Kylie Moore-Gilbert who spent more than 800 days imprisoned in Iran and has carried out research into protests and revolutions in the Middle East.  Kylie explains we’ll see more bloodshed before we see the end of the unrest.   The protests have spread to 140 cities and towns and evolved into the most significant challenge to the Islamic Republic in over a decade. In today’s Briefing, Iran’s youth revolution Headlines: - Massive earthquake in Indonesia kills more than 160  - NASA returns to moon’s orbit   - QLD police lashed in sexism inquiry   - World Cup ‘one love’ armband ban  - More wild weather on east coast Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Kylie Moore-Gilbert: Why Iranian protests are going into a third month

Protests against Iran's clerical establishment erupted two months ago after the death in custody of Mahsa Amini, a 22-year-old woman who was detained by morality police for allegedly breaking the strict hijab rules.   We’re joined by Dr Kylie Moore-Gilbert who spent more than 800 days imprisoned in Iran and has carried out research into protests and revolutions in the Middle East.  Kylie explains we’ll see more bloodshed before we see the end of the unrest.   The protests have spread to 140 cities and towns and evolved into the most significant challenge to the Islamic Republic in over a decade. In today’s Briefing, Iran’s youth revolution Headlines: - Massive earthquake in Indonesia kills more than 160  - NASA returns to moon’s orbit   - QLD police lashed in sexism inquiry   - World Cup ‘one love’ armband ban  - More wild weather on east coast Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

21:05

EP274 - S3

21 Nov 22

Vic Election: The backstory of Daniel Andrews

Victoria will head to the polls this weekend, to decide whether to re-elect Daniel Andrews. We look into what has shaped the man who has become one of Australia’s most powerful and divisive premiers.   We speak to Sumeyya Ilanbey from The Age who has written a biography of Andrews, the man who is likely to lead his government into a third term.  Headlines: - Severe weather lashes east - FIFA World Cup begins in Qatar - Elon Musk reinstates Trump’s Twitter account - Historic deal struck at the UN's COP27 summit - Five dead in Colorado shooting; more medibank data released; Chris Hemsworth takes a break; Lisa Wilkinson leaves The Project; Kath & Kim airs 20 year reunion Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Vic Election: The backstory of Daniel Andrews

Victoria will head to the polls this weekend, to decide whether to re-elect Daniel Andrews. We look into what has shaped the man who has become one of Australia’s most powerful and divisive premiers.   We speak to Sumeyya Ilanbey from The Age who has written a biography of Andrews, the man who is likely to lead his government into a third term.  Headlines: - Severe weather lashes east - FIFA World Cup begins in Qatar - Elon Musk reinstates Trump’s Twitter account - Historic deal struck at the UN's COP27 summit - Five dead in Colorado shooting; more medibank data released; Chris Hemsworth takes a break; Lisa Wilkinson leaves The Project; Kath & Kim airs 20 year reunion Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

22:18

EP273 - S3

20 Nov 22

Tom Boyd’s surprising call for AFL reform.

Tom Boyd was just eighteen years old when he was named the number one AFL draft pick of 2013. After briefly playing for Greater Western Sydney he moved back to Melbourne to join the Western Bulldogs. The teenager’s contract was worth a record-breaking $7 million. Tom Boyd was instrumental in the Bulldogs premiership of 2016, the team’s first in 62 years. Three years later, at 23 years old, Tom made the decision to retire from footy, shocking fans, commentators and everyone who had predicted a long and glittering career. In this conversation Jamila Rizvi & Tom Boyd discuss the pressure and scrutiny that came with Tom’s AFL career, including the cycle of severe insomnia, depression and anxiety, plus his insights on what the AFL can do better to help players both on and off the field.  THE WEEKEND LIST WATCH: Donna Hay Christmas – Disney+ WATCH: The Phantom of The Opera – Arts Centre Melbourne DO: Check out Black Friday & Cyber Monday sales GET: Witchery X KITX capsule collection 'Towards a Sustainable Future’ Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Tom Boyd’s surprising call for AFL reform.

Tom Boyd was just eighteen years old when he was named the number one AFL draft pick of 2013. After briefly playing for Greater Western Sydney he moved back to Melbourne to join the Western Bulldogs. The teenager’s contract was worth a record-breaking $7 million. Tom Boyd was instrumental in the Bulldogs premiership of 2016, the team’s first in 62 years. Three years later, at 23 years old, Tom made the decision to retire from footy, shocking fans, commentators and everyone who had predicted a long and glittering career. In this conversation Jamila Rizvi & Tom Boyd discuss the pressure and scrutiny that came with Tom’s AFL career, including the cycle of severe insomnia, depression and anxiety, plus his insights on what the AFL can do better to help players both on and off the field.  THE WEEKEND LIST WATCH: Donna Hay Christmas – Disney+ WATCH: The Phantom of The Opera – Arts Centre Melbourne DO: Check out Black Friday & Cyber Monday sales GET: Witchery X KITX capsule collection 'Towards a Sustainable Future’ Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

32:37

EP272 - S3

18 Nov 22

It's baaaack. Covid rears its ugly head

Covid cases are rapidly rising on Australia's east coast, leading Queensland to issue an amber alert across the state. There are fears Australia is heading for a Covid crisis in the lead up to Christmas.  Experts are urging us to work from home; there are calls for mask mandates to be re-introduced; and Queensland has issued an amber alert across the state.  In this episode of the Briefing, we talk new strains, new risks and just how worried we need to be this Summer. To answer all these questions we’re joined by Associate Professor Paul Griffin who’s an infectious diseases doctor and microbiologist at Brisbane’s Mater Hospital.  Headlines: - Australian released from Myanmar prison - Three sentenced following MH17 trial - Third missing in floods; Guy Sebastian’s manager sentenced; Twiggy donates to Ukraine; Taylor Swift crashes Ticketmaster - Neighbours is coming back Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

It's baaaack. Covid rears its ugly head

Covid cases are rapidly rising on Australia's east coast, leading Queensland to issue an amber alert across the state. There are fears Australia is heading for a Covid crisis in the lead up to Christmas.  Experts are urging us to work from home; there are calls for mask mandates to be re-introduced; and Queensland has issued an amber alert across the state.  In this episode of the Briefing, we talk new strains, new risks and just how worried we need to be this Summer. To answer all these questions we’re joined by Associate Professor Paul Griffin who’s an infectious diseases doctor and microbiologist at Brisbane’s Mater Hospital.  Headlines: - Australian released from Myanmar prison - Three sentenced following MH17 trial - Third missing in floods; Guy Sebastian’s manager sentenced; Twiggy donates to Ukraine; Taylor Swift crashes Ticketmaster - Neighbours is coming back Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

20:20

EP271 - S3

17 Nov 22

NSW floods: “It’s like nothing I’ve ever seen before”

Towns in the Central West of NSW have been inundated by floodwaters this week.  Residents of Forbes were told to leave town with the Lachlan River forecast to hit a new record. There were wild scenes across a number of small towns on Monday: more than 100 people were rescued by helicopter in Eugowra. Molong and Canowindra were also hard hit by flooding, and Wyangla Dam on the Lachlan has been overflowing.    We’re joined by Jamie Jones, deputy mayor of Cabonne Shire Council and Kathy Finn, the manager of Hay’s Shear Outback, the Shearer’s Hall of Fame, to give us a snapshot of the impact of the floods – which in itself is amazing, given the two communities are more than 500kms apart.  In this episode of the Briefing, we bring you the voices of people hammered by flooding in the NSW Central West.  Headlines: - Ukraine war: crisis averted - Trump launches 2024 presidential bid - NSW floods claim another life - Deliveroo leaves Australia - Kevin Spacey charged; Tesla recalls cars; NASA launches Artemis Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

NSW floods: “It’s like nothing I’ve ever seen before”

Towns in the Central West of NSW have been inundated by floodwaters this week.  Residents of Forbes were told to leave town with the Lachlan River forecast to hit a new record. There were wild scenes across a number of small towns on Monday: more than 100 people were rescued by helicopter in Eugowra. Molong and Canowindra were also hard hit by flooding, and Wyangla Dam on the Lachlan has been overflowing.    We’re joined by Jamie Jones, deputy mayor of Cabonne Shire Council and Kathy Finn, the manager of Hay’s Shear Outback, the Shearer’s Hall of Fame, to give us a snapshot of the impact of the floods – which in itself is amazing, given the two communities are more than 500kms apart.  In this episode of the Briefing, we bring you the voices of people hammered by flooding in the NSW Central West.  Headlines: - Ukraine war: crisis averted - Trump launches 2024 presidential bid - NSW floods claim another life - Deliveroo leaves Australia - Kevin Spacey charged; Tesla recalls cars; NASA launches Artemis Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

21:50

EP270 - S3

16 Nov 22

Detective gives inside story on covert operation to stop child abuse

A brand new podcast has lifted the lid on every parent’s worst nightmare. Listnr’s new podcast, The Children in the Pictures follows Australian documentary-maker and dad, Akhim Dev, as he uncovers the truth behind a global criminal network of child sexual abuse.   We’re joined by Detective Inspector Jon Rouse, who has been running Taskforce Argos at QLD Police for 25 years. His team infiltrates child sex networks to find 'the children in the pictures' – and hopefully to arrest and convict those responsible.  On today’s Briefing, a sneak peak at this new eight-part series examining how the fastest-growing serious crime in the world has become endemic online, and explores what we can all do to fight it. Headlines: - Two missing in NSW floods - Albanese meets with Xi Jinping  - Covid wave to soon be over  - Djokovic to play Aus Open  - AGL: Cannon-Brookes victorious Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Detective gives inside story on covert operation to stop child abuse

A brand new podcast has lifted the lid on every parent’s worst nightmare. Listnr’s new podcast, The Children in the Pictures follows Australian documentary-maker and dad, Akhim Dev, as he uncovers the truth behind a global criminal network of child sexual abuse.   We’re joined by Detective Inspector Jon Rouse, who has been running Taskforce Argos at QLD Police for 25 years. His team infiltrates child sex networks to find 'the children in the pictures' – and hopefully to arrest and convict those responsible.  On today’s Briefing, a sneak peak at this new eight-part series examining how the fastest-growing serious crime in the world has become endemic online, and explores what we can all do to fight it. Headlines: - Two missing in NSW floods - Albanese meets with Xi Jinping  - Covid wave to soon be over  - Djokovic to play Aus Open  - AGL: Cannon-Brookes victorious Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

23:02

EP269 - S3

15 Nov 22

Elon Musk's Twitter chaos, blow by blow

After Elon Musk’s incredible success at Tesla and Paypal, the world wanted to see what he would do when he announced he was buying Twitter. So far, it's been a disaster. From day one, Musk has pivoted from one mistake to another, sacking thousands of people before backtracking and making a complete mess of the verification process.  In today’s Briefing, we take a deep dive on Elon Musk’s twitter chaos, blow by blow with David Swan, the tech editor at The Australian newspaper. Headlines: - Flood crisis worsening in western NSW - Anthony Albanese to meet Xi Jinping  - Medibank: Mental health data leaked  - Folbigg inquiry examines role of mutant gene - Amazon boss Bezos to give away his fortune Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Elon Musk's Twitter chaos, blow by blow

After Elon Musk’s incredible success at Tesla and Paypal, the world wanted to see what he would do when he announced he was buying Twitter. So far, it's been a disaster. From day one, Musk has pivoted from one mistake to another, sacking thousands of people before backtracking and making a complete mess of the verification process.  In today’s Briefing, we take a deep dive on Elon Musk’s twitter chaos, blow by blow with David Swan, the tech editor at The Australian newspaper. Headlines: - Flood crisis worsening in western NSW - Anthony Albanese to meet Xi Jinping  - Medibank: Mental health data leaked  - Folbigg inquiry examines role of mutant gene - Amazon boss Bezos to give away his fortune Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

23:57

EP268 - S3

14 Nov 22

Surrogacy, Rebel Wilson, and whether we need to change our laws

Rebel Wilson has just announced her daughter was born via surrogate. She’s one of a growing number of people having their children this way. In her announcement she thanked the surrogate who “carried Royce and birthed her with such grace and care,” and it got us talking about surrogacy.  In today's Briefing, we speak to lawyer Sarah Jefford, a surrogate herself, about the Australia system which forces the majority of couples who want a surrogate, to go overseas.  Headlines: - US: Democrats hold the senate - Biden speaks to Albo ahead of China talks - Celebrations in Ukraine - Wild weather lashes the south east - Victorian election begins Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Surrogacy, Rebel Wilson, and whether we need to change our laws

Rebel Wilson has just announced her daughter was born via surrogate. She’s one of a growing number of people having their children this way. In her announcement she thanked the surrogate who “carried Royce and birthed her with such grace and care,” and it got us talking about surrogacy.  In today's Briefing, we speak to lawyer Sarah Jefford, a surrogate herself, about the Australia system which forces the majority of couples who want a surrogate, to go overseas.  Headlines: - US: Democrats hold the senate - Biden speaks to Albo ahead of China talks - Celebrations in Ukraine - Wild weather lashes the south east - Victorian election begins Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

20:35

EP267 - S3

13 Nov 22

Brooke Blurton is more than The Bachelorette

Brooke Blurton was Australia's first ever Indigenous and bisexual Bachelorette. There is so more to this impressive young woman than reality TV fame. Brooke is a passionate advocate for mental health, a proud champion of young queer people and people of colour. In her new book Big Love, she reveals a far more complex character than we were permitted to see on screen, and speaks about a childhood that was truly harrowing at times but nonetheless, full of love. In this conversation Jamila Rizvi and Brooke Blurton dive into the importance of identity and culture, mental health and breaking through intergenerational trauma.  THE WEEKEND LIST LISTEN: Jan Fran ‘I Just Thought, This Is It' - The Jess Rowe Big Talk Show Podcast WATCH: The Great British Bake Off - BINGE LISTEN: Peking Duk Podcast GET: Nala Underwear  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Brooke Blurton is more than The Bachelorette

Brooke Blurton was Australia's first ever Indigenous and bisexual Bachelorette. There is so more to this impressive young woman than reality TV fame. Brooke is a passionate advocate for mental health, a proud champion of young queer people and people of colour. In her new book Big Love, she reveals a far more complex character than we were permitted to see on screen, and speaks about a childhood that was truly harrowing at times but nonetheless, full of love. In this conversation Jamila Rizvi and Brooke Blurton dive into the importance of identity and culture, mental health and breaking through intergenerational trauma.  THE WEEKEND LIST LISTEN: Jan Fran ‘I Just Thought, This Is It' - The Jess Rowe Big Talk Show Podcast WATCH: The Great British Bake Off - BINGE LISTEN: Peking Duk Podcast GET: Nala Underwear  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

25:01

EP266 - S3

11 Nov 22

Wil Anderson: I am NOT fine, thanks

Wil Anderson’s new book is called I am NOT fine, thanks.  It's all about how the pandemic impacted us: we worked from home, or maybe lost our jobs, or began losing friends down rabbit holes.  Wil says it’s time to bring those who drifted into conspiracy theories back into the fold.    In today’s Briefing, Wil Anderson talks us through how the pandemic impacted his career and how he found himself living among vaccine deniers on the NSW north coast, how he deals with the impact of lockdowns, and how it’s OK to say ‘I’m NOT fine, thanks’.  Headlines: - Chris Dawson’s daughter wants to know where her mother’s body is - US inflation down - A new wave of Covid is taking hold - Thousands leave Optus following hack Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Wil Anderson: I am NOT fine, thanks

Wil Anderson’s new book is called I am NOT fine, thanks.  It's all about how the pandemic impacted us: we worked from home, or maybe lost our jobs, or began losing friends down rabbit holes.  Wil says it’s time to bring those who drifted into conspiracy theories back into the fold.    In today’s Briefing, Wil Anderson talks us through how the pandemic impacted his career and how he found himself living among vaccine deniers on the NSW north coast, how he deals with the impact of lockdowns, and how it’s OK to say ‘I’m NOT fine, thanks’.  Headlines: - Chris Dawson’s daughter wants to know where her mother’s body is - US inflation down - A new wave of Covid is taking hold - Thousands leave Optus following hack Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

20:11

EP265 - S3

10 Nov 22

Why 2022 was a bad year for billionaires

We all watched in amazement as the world’s super-rich went gangbusters during the pandemic. Some of the increases in wealth were next level. If 2020 and 2021 were dream years, 2022 has been a nightmare for billionaires.  James Thomson writes the Chanticleer column in the Australian Financial Review.  James explains why the pandemic was so profitable for the uber-wealthy, and why 2022 has seen some experience up to 40 percent falls in their net worth.  In today’s Briefing, why 2022 was a bad year for billionaires. Headlines: - Medibank customer information leaked to dark web - Democrats outperform expectations - Russia withdraw from Kherson - Meta lays off 11,000 staff - Eggs thrown at King Charles Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Why 2022 was a bad year for billionaires

We all watched in amazement as the world’s super-rich went gangbusters during the pandemic. Some of the increases in wealth were next level. If 2020 and 2021 were dream years, 2022 has been a nightmare for billionaires.  James Thomson writes the Chanticleer column in the Australian Financial Review.  James explains why the pandemic was so profitable for the uber-wealthy, and why 2022 has seen some experience up to 40 percent falls in their net worth.  In today’s Briefing, why 2022 was a bad year for billionaires. Headlines: - Medibank customer information leaked to dark web - Democrats outperform expectations - Russia withdraw from Kherson - Meta lays off 11,000 staff - Eggs thrown at King Charles Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

21:51

EP264 - S3

9 Nov 22

Scientists talk to people in their sleep

We dive into some mindblowing research scientists have been doing in the field of lucid dreaming. They’ve actually spoken to people in their sleep, even asking them to solve complex mathematical problems, and those people have responded. It’s a bit like the real life version of that movie Inception, where Leonardo DiCaprio entered into other people’s dreams and interacted with them.  We're joined by Ken Paller, professor of psychology and director of the Cognitive Neuroscience Program at Northwestern University.   Scientists think being able to communicate with people while they’re having a lucid dream has incredible potential, like helping people with PTSD overcome trauma as well as allowing elite athletes and performers to practice doing complex skills. Headlines: - US midterm elections underway  - Teen admits to blackmailing Optus customers - Secret report into sports rorts revealed - Coles and Woolies plastic recycling program collapses Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Scientists talk to people in their sleep

We dive into some mindblowing research scientists have been doing in the field of lucid dreaming. They’ve actually spoken to people in their sleep, even asking them to solve complex mathematical problems, and those people have responded. It’s a bit like the real life version of that movie Inception, where Leonardo DiCaprio entered into other people’s dreams and interacted with them.  We're joined by Ken Paller, professor of psychology and director of the Cognitive Neuroscience Program at Northwestern University.   Scientists think being able to communicate with people while they’re having a lucid dream has incredible potential, like helping people with PTSD overcome trauma as well as allowing elite athletes and performers to practice doing complex skills. Headlines: - US midterm elections underway  - Teen admits to blackmailing Optus customers - Secret report into sports rorts revealed - Coles and Woolies plastic recycling program collapses Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

20:56

EP263 - S3

8 Nov 22

Why these US midterms could be a game changer

The US midterm elections are happening this week, with major implications for President Joe Biden. A third of the seats in the US senate are on the ballot along with every seat in the House of Representatives; that means the country’s legislature could swing towards either party. Biden’s Democrats are hoping to win votes by focusing on abortion rights and democracy, while Republicans are concentrating on the economy and immigration. They’re beginning today and they could have major implications for President Joe Biden; action on climate change and spending on the war in Ukraine will influence the playing field of the 2024 presidential campaign - and pave the way for Donald Trump running again.  We take a deep dive with former Chaser and Planet America host Chas Licciardello. Headlines: - Medibank is facing a class action - Sri Lanka Cricketer refused bail - Scott Morrison has been warned by the attorney-general - Teal independents reveal election spend Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Why these US midterms could be a game changer

The US midterm elections are happening this week, with major implications for President Joe Biden. A third of the seats in the US senate are on the ballot along with every seat in the House of Representatives; that means the country’s legislature could swing towards either party. Biden’s Democrats are hoping to win votes by focusing on abortion rights and democracy, while Republicans are concentrating on the economy and immigration. They’re beginning today and they could have major implications for President Joe Biden; action on climate change and spending on the war in Ukraine will influence the playing field of the 2024 presidential campaign - and pave the way for Donald Trump running again.  We take a deep dive with former Chaser and Planet America host Chas Licciardello. Headlines: - Medibank is facing a class action - Sri Lanka Cricketer refused bail - Scott Morrison has been warned by the attorney-general - Teal independents reveal election spend Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

21:09

EP262 - S3

7 Nov 22

Are we witnessing the worst housing market crash in Australian history?

The Australian housing market is experiencing strange times. In this episode we’ll look at previous downturns, and how they’ve panned out to discover if the current downturn will be the worst housing market crash in Australian history. We chat to Eliza Owen, Property Analyst from Corelogic to give us the inside scoop.  Headlines: - COP 27: past 8 years hottest on record - Floodwaters move downstream - Sri Lankan cricketer faces court over sexual assault - Elon Musk lays off workers as advertisers leave Twitter - Tributes flow for Aaron Carter Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Are we witnessing the worst housing market crash in Australian history?

The Australian housing market is experiencing strange times. In this episode we’ll look at previous downturns, and how they’ve panned out to discover if the current downturn will be the worst housing market crash in Australian history. We chat to Eliza Owen, Property Analyst from Corelogic to give us the inside scoop.  Headlines: - COP 27: past 8 years hottest on record - Floodwaters move downstream - Sri Lankan cricketer faces court over sexual assault - Elon Musk lays off workers as advertisers leave Twitter - Tributes flow for Aaron Carter Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

22:02

EP261 - S3

6 Nov 22

Teela Reid and the Statement From the Heart.

Teela Reid is a proud Wiradjuri and Wailwan woman, lawyer, and story-teller. Teela was also involved in the Constitutional dialogue process that culminated in the Uluru Statement from the Heart. The Prime Minister has foreshadowed a referendum on the question of a First Nations Voice to Parliament; a key component of the Statement of the Heart. One day soon we will all be called upon to vote on this critical question. In this conversation Jamila Rizvi and Teela Reid discuss kinship, oral history, colonization, healing, treaty, and much more.  THE WEEKEND LIST: READ: Audiobooks from your local library WATCH: Emilia – Arts Centre Melbourne WATCH: Drink Masters – Netflix READ: Uluru Statement From The Heart Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Teela Reid and the Statement From the Heart.

Teela Reid is a proud Wiradjuri and Wailwan woman, lawyer, and story-teller. Teela was also involved in the Constitutional dialogue process that culminated in the Uluru Statement from the Heart. The Prime Minister has foreshadowed a referendum on the question of a First Nations Voice to Parliament; a key component of the Statement of the Heart. One day soon we will all be called upon to vote on this critical question. In this conversation Jamila Rizvi and Teela Reid discuss kinship, oral history, colonization, healing, treaty, and much more.  THE WEEKEND LIST: READ: Audiobooks from your local library WATCH: Emilia – Arts Centre Melbourne WATCH: Drink Masters – Netflix READ: Uluru Statement From The Heart Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

28:45

EP260 - S3

4 Nov 22

Mental health responses that are gut led

In our first two episodes of the gut instinct series, we’ve explored the growing evidence that suggests how so much of what happens in the gut impacts diseases traditionally linked to the brain. We’ve also examined the booming multi-billion dollar probiotics and kombucha industries, and found they have little or limited effect on the gut. So what other ways can we treat the mind via our guts? Around a third of GPs now identify as integrative doctors who blend conventional medicine with lifestyle interventions.  We chat to Dr William Barnes, who is an Integrative GP and Functional Medicine Doctor. Headlines: - Cyber crime is surging - NSW communities hit with more floods - Brian Houston slams Hillsong board - Online child exploitation surging - Imran Khan survives assassination attempt Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Mental health responses that are gut led

In our first two episodes of the gut instinct series, we’ve explored the growing evidence that suggests how so much of what happens in the gut impacts diseases traditionally linked to the brain. We’ve also examined the booming multi-billion dollar probiotics and kombucha industries, and found they have little or limited effect on the gut. So what other ways can we treat the mind via our guts? Around a third of GPs now identify as integrative doctors who blend conventional medicine with lifestyle interventions.  We chat to Dr William Barnes, who is an Integrative GP and Functional Medicine Doctor. Headlines: - Cyber crime is surging - NSW communities hit with more floods - Brian Houston slams Hillsong board - Online child exploitation surging - Imran Khan survives assassination attempt Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

20:07

EP259 - S3

3 Nov 22

Putting Kombucha and Probiotics under the Microscope

Globally the kombucha and probiotics market is worth billions and it’s rapidly growing as people spend big on wellness and gut health. In part two of our three part series on gut health, we’ll be exploring if we’re being fooled by some of the extraordinary health claims these products make. Or maybe there's a tiny nugget of truth in the proclamations— and it's just been over-hyped. We talk to Jordan Stanford from the University of Wollongong, a dietician with a PhD investigating dietary interventions to improve gut health. Headlines: - Cassius Turvey vigils held across the country - Woman at centre of Hawthorn investigation pulls out - New gambling taglines - Taronga Zoo investigates escaped lions Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Putting Kombucha and Probiotics under the Microscope

Globally the kombucha and probiotics market is worth billions and it’s rapidly growing as people spend big on wellness and gut health. In part two of our three part series on gut health, we’ll be exploring if we’re being fooled by some of the extraordinary health claims these products make. Or maybe there's a tiny nugget of truth in the proclamations— and it's just been over-hyped. We talk to Jordan Stanford from the University of Wollongong, a dietician with a PhD investigating dietary interventions to improve gut health. Headlines: - Cassius Turvey vigils held across the country - Woman at centre of Hawthorn investigation pulls out - New gambling taglines - Taronga Zoo investigates escaped lions Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

21:17

EP258 - S3

2 Nov 22

Is the gut really our second brain?

This series will examine the growing body of evidence between gut health and gut microbiomes to mental health, sleep disorders and in some cases even autism. Should we be changing our approach to mental health treatment which is so heavily geared toward quick pharmaceutical interventions? Professor Emad El-Omar is the director of the University of New South Wales Microbiome Research Centre and is also a professor of medicine. He chats with us about the ins and outs of our gut health. Headlines: - RBA hikes rates again and warns more on the way - Cold snap freezes the south east - Nine arrested after India bridge collapse - Rapper Takeoff shot dead - Gold Trip wins Melbourne Cup Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Is the gut really our second brain?

This series will examine the growing body of evidence between gut health and gut microbiomes to mental health, sleep disorders and in some cases even autism. Should we be changing our approach to mental health treatment which is so heavily geared toward quick pharmaceutical interventions? Professor Emad El-Omar is the director of the University of New South Wales Microbiome Research Centre and is also a professor of medicine. He chats with us about the ins and outs of our gut health. Headlines: - RBA hikes rates again and warns more on the way - Cold snap freezes the south east - Nine arrested after India bridge collapse - Rapper Takeoff shot dead - Gold Trip wins Melbourne Cup Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

17:20

EP257 - S3

1 Nov 22

Why our wages aren’t going up

Australian workers have been getting a raw deal on wages.  Wages actually being stolen, that is, unlawful underpayment, and then there’s the terrible bargaining power that has seen real wages flat-line for the last decade.  That’s one of the issues the Labor party campaigned on to get into office, and now that they’re in office, it's proving hard to change.  Ben Schneiders has been investigating the wage problem for years, he’s an investigative journalist with The Age and author of “Hard Labour: Wage Theft in the Age of Inequality." Headlines: - Not enough police at South Korea’s crowd crush tragedy - Netball Australia has new sponsor  - Brazil elects new left-wing president - Jetstar under fire after woman crawled down aisle - Melbourne Cup set to be cold / RBA to hike interest rates / Will you pay for a Twitter blue tick? Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Why our wages aren’t going up

Australian workers have been getting a raw deal on wages.  Wages actually being stolen, that is, unlawful underpayment, and then there’s the terrible bargaining power that has seen real wages flat-line for the last decade.  That’s one of the issues the Labor party campaigned on to get into office, and now that they’re in office, it's proving hard to change.  Ben Schneiders has been investigating the wage problem for years, he’s an investigative journalist with The Age and author of “Hard Labour: Wage Theft in the Age of Inequality." Headlines: - Not enough police at South Korea’s crowd crush tragedy - Netball Australia has new sponsor  - Brazil elects new left-wing president - Jetstar under fire after woman crawled down aisle - Melbourne Cup set to be cold / RBA to hike interest rates / Will you pay for a Twitter blue tick? Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

22:21

EP256 - S3

31 Oct 22

Kanye’s antisemitic unravelling

It was a dramatic week last week in the story of Ye-formerly known as Kayne West. The list of companies that have walked away from Kanye is huge, he says it cost him $2bn in one day. So is this the end of Kanye’s career?  Kanye West, or Ye has been a master of controversy; he loves to shock. But in the last month his attacks on Jewish people have brought serious consequences.  We’ll get a Jewish perspective on Kanye from author John Safran. Headlines: - 150+ dead in Seoul crowd crush - Twitter hit by trolling campaign - Pelosi attacker charged with attempted murder - Cassius Turvey vigils to be held - New Covid strain detected  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Kanye’s antisemitic unravelling

It was a dramatic week last week in the story of Ye-formerly known as Kayne West. The list of companies that have walked away from Kanye is huge, he says it cost him $2bn in one day. So is this the end of Kanye’s career?  Kanye West, or Ye has been a master of controversy; he loves to shock. But in the last month his attacks on Jewish people have brought serious consequences.  We’ll get a Jewish perspective on Kanye from author John Safran. Headlines: - 150+ dead in Seoul crowd crush - Twitter hit by trolling campaign - Pelosi attacker charged with attempted murder - Cassius Turvey vigils to be held - New Covid strain detected  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

20:44

EP255 - S3

30 Oct 22

Ryan Shelton gets honest about ambition

Ryan Shelton is a hugely successful comedian, actor, writer, radio and television presenter. In this conversation Jamila Rizvi and Ryan Shelton discuss following opportunities for success, discovering the power of vulnerability and Ryan’s own creative processes, where he has found honesty as the secret for his latest accomplishments.  THE WEEKEND LIST: WATCH: Hocus Pocus & Hocus Pocus 2 – Disney+ LISTEN: How Other Dads Dad With Hamish Blake – Podcast WATCH: Eat The Rich: The Game Stop Saga – Netflix GET: Holme Beauty Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Ryan Shelton gets honest about ambition

Ryan Shelton is a hugely successful comedian, actor, writer, radio and television presenter. In this conversation Jamila Rizvi and Ryan Shelton discuss following opportunities for success, discovering the power of vulnerability and Ryan’s own creative processes, where he has found honesty as the secret for his latest accomplishments.  THE WEEKEND LIST: WATCH: Hocus Pocus & Hocus Pocus 2 – Disney+ LISTEN: How Other Dads Dad With Hamish Blake – Podcast WATCH: Eat The Rich: The Game Stop Saga – Netflix GET: Holme Beauty Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

33:26

EP254 - S3

28 Oct 22

Turning the tattoos of a dead family member into art

Trends in funerary practices and how the recently departed are remembered are nothing new. From face moulds of the dead to making the rear window of your car a rolling memorial, the way someone is remembered has changed through time. But would you turn the tattoos of a dead family member into art? Kyle Sherwood does just that for a living and it’s proving quite popular.  Remembrance is a very individual act. But would you ever preserve the tattoos of a loved one who's passed? Headlines: - Lehrmann jury dismissed - Northern Rivers buyback scheme announced - Dutton issues budget reply  - Socceroos protest Qatar human rights - Prince Harry’s book to be released in January Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Turning the tattoos of a dead family member into art

Trends in funerary practices and how the recently departed are remembered are nothing new. From face moulds of the dead to making the rear window of your car a rolling memorial, the way someone is remembered has changed through time. But would you turn the tattoos of a dead family member into art? Kyle Sherwood does just that for a living and it’s proving quite popular.  Remembrance is a very individual act. But would you ever preserve the tattoos of a loved one who's passed? Headlines: - Lehrmann jury dismissed - Northern Rivers buyback scheme announced - Dutton issues budget reply  - Socceroos protest Qatar human rights - Prince Harry’s book to be released in January Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

21:59

EP253 - S3

27 Oct 22

Australia’s most ‘boring city’ decriminalises drugs

Canberra might cop it a lot for being one of the most boring cities in Australia but it’s always been pretty progressive when it comes to social issues.  It’s the only place in Australia where the personal use of cannabis is legal. We recently shared with you here on The Briefing that it was hosting a trial of the first fixed pill testing site, and now the ACT government has passed legislation decriminalising small amounts of illicit drugs like cocaine, heroin and speed.  We speak to ACT Health Minister Rachel Stephen-Smith who explains that under the new law - which comes into effect in a year, people found with amounts of certain drugs considered to be "personal possession", so that’s smaller than trafficable quantities, would be subject to a civil fine of $100, rather than criminal charges, and be referred for counselling. Headlines: - Inflation hits new high - Lehrmann’s lawyers accuse Scomo of prejudicing trial - WA commissioner sparks outrage in indigenous community  - Wallam scores match-winning goal  - Dr Who to move to Disney+ Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Australia’s most ‘boring city’ decriminalises drugs

Canberra might cop it a lot for being one of the most boring cities in Australia but it’s always been pretty progressive when it comes to social issues.  It’s the only place in Australia where the personal use of cannabis is legal. We recently shared with you here on The Briefing that it was hosting a trial of the first fixed pill testing site, and now the ACT government has passed legislation decriminalising small amounts of illicit drugs like cocaine, heroin and speed.  We speak to ACT Health Minister Rachel Stephen-Smith who explains that under the new law - which comes into effect in a year, people found with amounts of certain drugs considered to be "personal possession", so that’s smaller than trafficable quantities, would be subject to a civil fine of $100, rather than criminal charges, and be referred for counselling. Headlines: - Inflation hits new high - Lehrmann’s lawyers accuse Scomo of prejudicing trial - WA commissioner sparks outrage in indigenous community  - Wallam scores match-winning goal  - Dr Who to move to Disney+ Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

21:15

EP252 - S3

26 Oct 22

The Budget Explained

Labor’s first budget in a decade has been handed down. It’s being touted as a cost of living budget that’s friendly for families. The government’s focus is on childcare, paid parental leave and disaster resilience as well as TAFE and university places. Treasurer Jim Chalmers has also taken into account our challenging economic times; growth is forecast to slump while unemployment is set to rise. We speak with the Australian Financial Review's Tom McIlroy about the Albanese government's first budget. Headlines: - Labor’s first budget is handed down - Lehrmann trial: Jury unable to reach unanimous verdict - Convicted murderer wants to reverse guilty plea - Adidas drops Ye aka Kanye West Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

The Budget Explained

Labor’s first budget in a decade has been handed down. It’s being touted as a cost of living budget that’s friendly for families. The government’s focus is on childcare, paid parental leave and disaster resilience as well as TAFE and university places. Treasurer Jim Chalmers has also taken into account our challenging economic times; growth is forecast to slump while unemployment is set to rise. We speak with the Australian Financial Review's Tom McIlroy about the Albanese government's first budget. Headlines: - Labor’s first budget is handed down - Lehrmann trial: Jury unable to reach unanimous verdict - Convicted murderer wants to reverse guilty plea - Adidas drops Ye aka Kanye West Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

20:41

EP251 - S3

25 Oct 22

Young, rich, Indian: Meet the UK’s new Prime Minister

The UK's political saga continues with Rishi Sunak named the UK's new Prime Minister overnight. He replaces Liz Truss who was forced to resign just 45 days into the job after her disastrous mini-budget sent financial markets into meltdown. Truss had replaced Boris Johnson who sent his party into a meltdown.  Rishi is 42, the youngest person to take office in more than 200 years, and is the first from an Indian background. He’s also married to one of the UK’s wealthiest women. Later this week he’ll be officially appointed to the top job by King Charles III. We speak with Rob Harris, The Age's reporter in London about who the new Prime Minister is, and how the last few tumultuous weeks in UK politics unfolded.  Headlines: - Rishi Sunak named UK Prime Minister - Labor’s budget to be handed down - Floodwaters start receding - Man charged with murder over indigenous boy’s death  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Young, rich, Indian: Meet the UK’s new Prime Minister

The UK's political saga continues with Rishi Sunak named the UK's new Prime Minister overnight. He replaces Liz Truss who was forced to resign just 45 days into the job after her disastrous mini-budget sent financial markets into meltdown. Truss had replaced Boris Johnson who sent his party into a meltdown.  Rishi is 42, the youngest person to take office in more than 200 years, and is the first from an Indian background. He’s also married to one of the UK’s wealthiest women. Later this week he’ll be officially appointed to the top job by King Charles III. We speak with Rob Harris, The Age's reporter in London about who the new Prime Minister is, and how the last few tumultuous weeks in UK politics unfolded.  Headlines: - Rishi Sunak named UK Prime Minister - Labor’s budget to be handed down - Floodwaters start receding - Man charged with murder over indigenous boy’s death  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

19:58

EP250 - S3

24 Oct 22

Simon Holmes à Court: how school bullying inspired a political revolution

On election day, a record number of independents seized previously "safe" seats and helped spell the end of the near decade-long Liberal government. It was a teal wave that surged stronger than anyone had expected, and it was backed by Climate 200 - a non profit, non partisan group that employed crowdfunding, whose founder, Simon Holmes à Court says is just getting started.   Simon joins us on the Briefing to talk through his motivation for establishing Climate 200 and what he expects will happen at the upcoming NSW and Victorian elections.  His new book, The Big Teal, is out now. It focuses how his Climate 200 group won over what he calls the ‘forgotten people’ of the 21st Century: women and younger voters especially - and how no seat in Australia will ever be safe again. Headlines: - The east coast cops another drenching - Australia pledges to cut methane - Chinese president Xi Jinping begins record-breaking third term - Netball Australia faces sponsorship crisis - Boris Johnson likely for second tilt at UK PM Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Simon Holmes à Court: how school bullying inspired a political revolution

On election day, a record number of independents seized previously "safe" seats and helped spell the end of the near decade-long Liberal government. It was a teal wave that surged stronger than anyone had expected, and it was backed by Climate 200 - a non profit, non partisan group that employed crowdfunding, whose founder, Simon Holmes à Court says is just getting started.   Simon joins us on the Briefing to talk through his motivation for establishing Climate 200 and what he expects will happen at the upcoming NSW and Victorian elections.  His new book, The Big Teal, is out now. It focuses how his Climate 200 group won over what he calls the ‘forgotten people’ of the 21st Century: women and younger voters especially - and how no seat in Australia will ever be safe again. Headlines: - The east coast cops another drenching - Australia pledges to cut methane - Chinese president Xi Jinping begins record-breaking third term - Netball Australia faces sponsorship crisis - Boris Johnson likely for second tilt at UK PM Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

21:53

EP249 - S3

23 Oct 22

Allegra Spender on why teal is the new black.

If you tuned in to watch this year’s federal election night coverage, even for a few moments, you would have seen a sea of teal. All the political commentators could talk about was the wave of centre right independents who had claimed previously safe Liberal party seats. At the centre of these shifting political winds is Allegra Spender, former businesswoman and now the member for Wentworth covering some of Sydney’s wealthiest suburbs. Allegra Spender comes from a high-profile family, with both her father and grandfather being MPs and her mother, the late fashion designer Carla Zampatti.  In this conversation, Jamila Rizvi and Allegra Spender cover everything from tax cuts, climate change, women’s issues and Australia’s ever-changing political climate.   The Weekend List: Watch: Don’t Worry Darling Listen: FULL STORY: Ben Roberts-Smith V The Media - Podcast Watch: Easy-Bake Battle: The Home Cooking Competition - Netflix Cook: Sweet Potato Tea Cake – Bon Appetit Recipe Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Allegra Spender on why teal is the new black.

If you tuned in to watch this year’s federal election night coverage, even for a few moments, you would have seen a sea of teal. All the political commentators could talk about was the wave of centre right independents who had claimed previously safe Liberal party seats. At the centre of these shifting political winds is Allegra Spender, former businesswoman and now the member for Wentworth covering some of Sydney’s wealthiest suburbs. Allegra Spender comes from a high-profile family, with both her father and grandfather being MPs and her mother, the late fashion designer Carla Zampatti.  In this conversation, Jamila Rizvi and Allegra Spender cover everything from tax cuts, climate change, women’s issues and Australia’s ever-changing political climate.   The Weekend List: Watch: Don’t Worry Darling Listen: FULL STORY: Ben Roberts-Smith V The Media - Podcast Watch: Easy-Bake Battle: The Home Cooking Competition - Netflix Cook: Sweet Potato Tea Cake – Bon Appetit Recipe Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

28:48

EP248 - S3

21 Oct 22

The Aussie metal band going green

Why has an Aussie heavy metal band gone green? In Hearts Wake have used their passion for ecological advocacy, to push the boundaries of the music industry by recording, releasing and performing their last album, (Kaliyuga), in a radically new and sustainable way. Kaliyuga became the first carbon offset album, pressed on recycled materials to hit the top 5 in the ARIA Australian Albums Chart as it debuted at #3. We’re joined by the band’s front man Jake Taylor, who also directed a new documentary about the band’s eco journey, Green Is The New Black, released yesterday on DocPlay and iTunes. This is a great example of truly believing in your cause and using your art to make the world a better place. Headlines: - UK PM Liz Truss resigns  - Greens senator steps down from leadership role - Towns brace for weekend floods - ACT government legalises small amounts of illicit drugs Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

The Aussie metal band going green

Why has an Aussie heavy metal band gone green? In Hearts Wake have used their passion for ecological advocacy, to push the boundaries of the music industry by recording, releasing and performing their last album, (Kaliyuga), in a radically new and sustainable way. Kaliyuga became the first carbon offset album, pressed on recycled materials to hit the top 5 in the ARIA Australian Albums Chart as it debuted at #3. We’re joined by the band’s front man Jake Taylor, who also directed a new documentary about the band’s eco journey, Green Is The New Black, released yesterday on DocPlay and iTunes. This is a great example of truly believing in your cause and using your art to make the world a better place. Headlines: - UK PM Liz Truss resigns  - Greens senator steps down from leadership role - Towns brace for weekend floods - ACT government legalises small amounts of illicit drugs Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

23:24

EP247 - S3

20 Oct 22

“Never seen anything like it”: Victoria’s flood disaster

Parts of NSW and Victoria are again under water as another big weather system heads for already sodden regions. Flood warnings are in place in NSW, Victoria, Queensland and South Australia. Thousands of people living in the Victorian NSW border towns of Echuca and Moama are bracing for a second flood in a week as local rivers peak.   We spoke to Bianca Hall, senior reporter with The Age newspaper early this morning. More than 700 flood rescues have been made since the disaster began, and thousands of people have been displaced.  On this morning’s Briefing, we get the latest from the flooded town of Echuca. Headlines: - Jurors deliberate Lehrmann case - Bureau of Meteorology rebrand cost $200,000+ - Damning review into Covid response - Gov spy agency working with Medibank on cyber attack Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

“Never seen anything like it”: Victoria’s flood disaster

Parts of NSW and Victoria are again under water as another big weather system heads for already sodden regions. Flood warnings are in place in NSW, Victoria, Queensland and South Australia. Thousands of people living in the Victorian NSW border towns of Echuca and Moama are bracing for a second flood in a week as local rivers peak.   We spoke to Bianca Hall, senior reporter with The Age newspaper early this morning. More than 700 flood rescues have been made since the disaster began, and thousands of people have been displaced.  On this morning’s Briefing, we get the latest from the flooded town of Echuca. Headlines: - Jurors deliberate Lehrmann case - Bureau of Meteorology rebrand cost $200,000+ - Damning review into Covid response - Gov spy agency working with Medibank on cyber attack Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

18:52

EP246 - S3

19 Oct 22

Will Alex Jones pay the Sandy Hook families?

Alex Jones is an American radio show host and prominent conspiracy theorist who was last week ordered to pay almost a billion dollars US to the families of the victims of the Sandy Hook school massacre. Jones had peddled the theory the shooting was a hoax to curb America’s gun laws.  A court in Connecticut ordered Jones to pay up – but he’s now claiming bankruptcy and there are fears the families will never receive the compensation they deserve.  Elizabeth Williamson, a New York Times journalist  and author of “Sandy Hook: An American Tragedy and the Battle for Truth” joins us to explain if the families will ever see any money, and how Jones has managed to slip the net of accountability for the pain and suffering he’s caused. Headlines: - More rain for already sodden towns - Bruce Lehrmann trial begins to wrap up - Israel condemns reversing Jerusalem decision - Royals could be headed down under in 2024 Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Will Alex Jones pay the Sandy Hook families?

Alex Jones is an American radio show host and prominent conspiracy theorist who was last week ordered to pay almost a billion dollars US to the families of the victims of the Sandy Hook school massacre. Jones had peddled the theory the shooting was a hoax to curb America’s gun laws.  A court in Connecticut ordered Jones to pay up – but he’s now claiming bankruptcy and there are fears the families will never receive the compensation they deserve.  Elizabeth Williamson, a New York Times journalist  and author of “Sandy Hook: An American Tragedy and the Battle for Truth” joins us to explain if the families will ever see any money, and how Jones has managed to slip the net of accountability for the pain and suffering he’s caused. Headlines: - More rain for already sodden towns - Bruce Lehrmann trial begins to wrap up - Israel condemns reversing Jerusalem decision - Royals could be headed down under in 2024 Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

20:15

EP245 - S3

18 Oct 22

Amber Heard's lawyer speaks to The Briefing

In today’s Briefing we look at a perverse twist of Me Too. The wave of abuse stories has come with a wave of defamation lawsuits. London-based barristers Jen Robinson and Keina Yoshida have written a book called How Many More Women detailing the way the law and the media has held back justice for sexual assault victims. The book, out today, is about how and why laws must change to protect women who are brave enough to speak out against their attackers. Headlines: - Consumers to brace for price hikes following floods - Politicians give evidence at Lehrmann trial - Australia drops Jerusalem as Australian capital of Israel - Calls for Nedd Brockman to be Australian of the year Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Amber Heard's lawyer speaks to The Briefing

In today’s Briefing we look at a perverse twist of Me Too. The wave of abuse stories has come with a wave of defamation lawsuits. London-based barristers Jen Robinson and Keina Yoshida have written a book called How Many More Women detailing the way the law and the media has held back justice for sexual assault victims. The book, out today, is about how and why laws must change to protect women who are brave enough to speak out against their attackers. Headlines: - Consumers to brace for price hikes following floods - Politicians give evidence at Lehrmann trial - Australia drops Jerusalem as Australian capital of Israel - Calls for Nedd Brockman to be Australian of the year Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

22:45

EP244 - S3

17 Oct 22

Grace Tame's brutal joke

Our guest on the Briefing today is Grace Tame – former Australian of the Year and author of a new memoir: The Ninth Life of a Diamond Miner. In her brand new book, Grace has told her story of being a victim of child sexual abuse in full, but for the first time we also get to know her very dark sense of humour. "One of my favorite jokes to make about the perpetrator who abused me is that he is like pedophile starter pack. You know, like he is a Catholic child-sexual abusing school teacher who wears New Balance 1080s and he plays the organ." In today’s Briefing, Tom interviews Grace about her life, her campaign and how she manages to find humour in light of everything she’s been through.  The Ninth Life of a Diamond Miner is out now. Headlines: - Thousands of homes inundated by floods - Gov commits to end violence against women - NSW shortchanged by Labor - Xi Jinping to embark on historic third term - Ghisliane Maxwell speaks from prison Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Grace Tame's brutal joke

Our guest on the Briefing today is Grace Tame – former Australian of the Year and author of a new memoir: The Ninth Life of a Diamond Miner. In her brand new book, Grace has told her story of being a victim of child sexual abuse in full, but for the first time we also get to know her very dark sense of humour. "One of my favorite jokes to make about the perpetrator who abused me is that he is like pedophile starter pack. You know, like he is a Catholic child-sexual abusing school teacher who wears New Balance 1080s and he plays the organ." In today’s Briefing, Tom interviews Grace about her life, her campaign and how she manages to find humour in light of everything she’s been through.  The Ninth Life of a Diamond Miner is out now. Headlines: - Thousands of homes inundated by floods - Gov commits to end violence against women - NSW shortchanged by Labor - Xi Jinping to embark on historic third term - Ghisliane Maxwell speaks from prison Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

18:49

EP243 - S3

16 Oct 22

Emma Carey fell from the sky – and survived.

Emma Carey says she wasn’t a particularly positive person before her accident. She was working in a job that she didn’t particularly like, going through the motions of life without a lot of spark or ambition. While not wanting to take away from the seriousness of her experience and the pain and anguish of recovery, Emma says her life has changed for the better. She has gained an appreciation for what it means to be alive.  Emma is now 29 years old and it’s been almost a decade since she literally fell 15,000 feet from the sky, and survived. Within what she has been through and what she has discovered along the way, are lessons for all of us. In this conversation Jamila Rizvi and Emma Carey discuss life after becoming disabled, gaining a new perspective on life and Emma's emotional recovery after the incident.  THE WEEKEND LIST: WATCH:  Derry Girls - Netflix READ: The Joy of Better Cooking by Alice Zaslavsky WATCH: The Redeem Team – Netflix WATCH: The Dropout – Disney+ Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Emma Carey fell from the sky – and survived.

Emma Carey says she wasn’t a particularly positive person before her accident. She was working in a job that she didn’t particularly like, going through the motions of life without a lot of spark or ambition. While not wanting to take away from the seriousness of her experience and the pain and anguish of recovery, Emma says her life has changed for the better. She has gained an appreciation for what it means to be alive.  Emma is now 29 years old and it’s been almost a decade since she literally fell 15,000 feet from the sky, and survived. Within what she has been through and what she has discovered along the way, are lessons for all of us. In this conversation Jamila Rizvi and Emma Carey discuss life after becoming disabled, gaining a new perspective on life and Emma's emotional recovery after the incident.  THE WEEKEND LIST: WATCH:  Derry Girls - Netflix READ: The Joy of Better Cooking by Alice Zaslavsky WATCH: The Redeem Team – Netflix WATCH: The Dropout – Disney+ Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

29:24

EP242 - S3

14 Oct 22

An important week in the battle for Ukraine

It’s been a critical week in the war in Ukraine.  After almost 9 months of conflict, more than 6,000 people have died and countless regions heavily shelled. Many expected Ukraine would fall within days, but they’ve launched an historic fightback and as you’ll hear from our guest, the Australian-Ukrainian journalist Misha Zelinsky, the Ukrainians are not giving up without a massive fight. Misha is reporting for the Australian Financial Review and he joins us for today’s Briefing to give an update on where we are today, and what the next six months looks like.  Headlines: - Flooding across Victoria, NSW and Tasmania - Higgins to return to the stand today - Alex Jones to pay $1.5B - Graphic video shown at Bali commemoration Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

An important week in the battle for Ukraine

It’s been a critical week in the war in Ukraine.  After almost 9 months of conflict, more than 6,000 people have died and countless regions heavily shelled. Many expected Ukraine would fall within days, but they’ve launched an historic fightback and as you’ll hear from our guest, the Australian-Ukrainian journalist Misha Zelinsky, the Ukrainians are not giving up without a massive fight. Misha is reporting for the Australian Financial Review and he joins us for today’s Briefing to give an update on where we are today, and what the next six months looks like.  Headlines: - Flooding across Victoria, NSW and Tasmania - Higgins to return to the stand today - Alex Jones to pay $1.5B - Graphic video shown at Bali commemoration Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

20:54

EP241 - S3

13 Oct 22

QLD’s DNA lab crisis from the man behind the Teacher’s Pet

An inquiry is underway into a Queensland lab that failed to test thousands of DNA samples. The lab demanded that to progress to DNA profiling, crime scene samples require the equivalent of at least 22 cells, but fewer than 10 cells can often produce a DNA profile.  The discovery was triggered by the Walkley Award winning journalist Hedley Thomas’ Shandee’s Story true crime podcast. It means there could now be thousands of miscarriages of justice related to the lab. Hedley joins us to talk us through how the crisis emerged and what it means for existing and future cases. In today’s Briefing, QLD’s DNA lab crisis from the man behind the Teacher’s Pet podcast. Headlines: - Ruby Princess class action begins - Victoria’s pandemic declaration ends - Biden plays down recession fears - NASA successfully nudges asteroid - Tributes flow for actress Angela Lansbury Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

QLD’s DNA lab crisis from the man behind the Teacher’s Pet

An inquiry is underway into a Queensland lab that failed to test thousands of DNA samples. The lab demanded that to progress to DNA profiling, crime scene samples require the equivalent of at least 22 cells, but fewer than 10 cells can often produce a DNA profile.  The discovery was triggered by the Walkley Award winning journalist Hedley Thomas’ Shandee’s Story true crime podcast. It means there could now be thousands of miscarriages of justice related to the lab. Hedley joins us to talk us through how the crisis emerged and what it means for existing and future cases. In today’s Briefing, QLD’s DNA lab crisis from the man behind the Teacher’s Pet podcast. Headlines: - Ruby Princess class action begins - Victoria’s pandemic declaration ends - Biden plays down recession fears - NASA successfully nudges asteroid - Tributes flow for actress Angela Lansbury Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

19:12

EP240 - S3

12 Oct 22

The sliding doors of tragedy: Bali Bombing 20 years on

It’s the 20th anniversary of the Bali bombings. On 12 October 2002, 202 people - including 88 Australians - were killed when explosions ripped through the Sari Club and Paddy’s Irish Bar in Kuta’s nightclub precinct. We speak to journalist Ali Donaldson who reported on the tragedy at the time, and is there for the anniversary now.  What surprised us the most in this interview is sometimes in life, the worst things that happen to us can have the biggest impact - sometimes in really positive ways.  In today’s Briefing, the sliding doors of tragedy as we mark 20 years since the Bali Bombings. Headlines: - A third of the world to go into recession - Floods forecast for Victoria - Robodebt reviews scrapped - Adnan Syed exonerated - Australia to launch new tourism ad Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

The sliding doors of tragedy: Bali Bombing 20 years on

It’s the 20th anniversary of the Bali bombings. On 12 October 2002, 202 people - including 88 Australians - were killed when explosions ripped through the Sari Club and Paddy’s Irish Bar in Kuta’s nightclub precinct. We speak to journalist Ali Donaldson who reported on the tragedy at the time, and is there for the anniversary now.  What surprised us the most in this interview is sometimes in life, the worst things that happen to us can have the biggest impact - sometimes in really positive ways.  In today’s Briefing, the sliding doors of tragedy as we mark 20 years since the Bali Bombings. Headlines: - A third of the world to go into recession - Floods forecast for Victoria - Robodebt reviews scrapped - Adnan Syed exonerated - Australia to launch new tourism ad Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

19:58

EP239 - S3

11 Oct 22

Why the ISIS brides are coming home

The Australian government is preparing to launch a mission to rescue dozens of Australian women and children trapped in Syrian detention camps. More than 20 Australian women and more than 40 children – the widows, sons and daughters of slain or jailed Islamic State combatants – remain within the al-Hol and Roj detention camps in north-east Syria. Many of the women held in the camps say they were coerced or tricked into travelling to Syria by husbands who have since died. Most of the Australian children are under six; several were born in the camps. We’re joined by Katja Theodorakis, head of ASPI’s counter terrorism program to talk to us about who these women and children are, and what their future looks like. In today’s Briefing, what’s next for Australia’s ISIS brides? Headlines: - Ukraine capital hit by missiles - BOM: wet summer ahead - A pill to cut greenhouse gas emissions - Higgins ‘unavailable’ in Lehrmann trial - John Farnham recovering well Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Why the ISIS brides are coming home

The Australian government is preparing to launch a mission to rescue dozens of Australian women and children trapped in Syrian detention camps. More than 20 Australian women and more than 40 children – the widows, sons and daughters of slain or jailed Islamic State combatants – remain within the al-Hol and Roj detention camps in north-east Syria. Many of the women held in the camps say they were coerced or tricked into travelling to Syria by husbands who have since died. Most of the Australian children are under six; several were born in the camps. We’re joined by Katja Theodorakis, head of ASPI’s counter terrorism program to talk to us about who these women and children are, and what their future looks like. In today’s Briefing, what’s next for Australia’s ISIS brides? Headlines: - Ukraine capital hit by missiles - BOM: wet summer ahead - A pill to cut greenhouse gas emissions - Higgins ‘unavailable’ in Lehrmann trial - John Farnham recovering well Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

19:25

EP238 - S3

10 Oct 22

Where does your data go when it's stolen?

Optus customers were horrified to discover last week their personal data had been hacked. Optus estimates that up to 9.8 million Australians could have their data compromised due to the attack, with 2.8 million severely impacted. So what exactly do the hackers do with your data? Ravi Sen is Associate Professor of Information and Operations Management, Texas A&M University.  Ravi joins us to explain firstly how your data is hacked, and secondly what the hackers actually do with it. Mandatory holding of data like in the Optus hack means email addresses etc can be used for phishing and other scams. On today’s Briefing, where does your data go when it’s stolen? Headlines: - Flood devastation as more rain expected - Chris Dawson’s daughter speaks out - Protestors glue themselves to Picasso artwork - Holden wins its final Bathurst 1000 Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Where does your data go when it's stolen?

Optus customers were horrified to discover last week their personal data had been hacked. Optus estimates that up to 9.8 million Australians could have their data compromised due to the attack, with 2.8 million severely impacted. So what exactly do the hackers do with your data? Ravi Sen is Associate Professor of Information and Operations Management, Texas A&M University.  Ravi joins us to explain firstly how your data is hacked, and secondly what the hackers actually do with it. Mandatory holding of data like in the Optus hack means email addresses etc can be used for phishing and other scams. On today’s Briefing, where does your data go when it’s stolen? Headlines: - Flood devastation as more rain expected - Chris Dawson’s daughter speaks out - Protestors glue themselves to Picasso artwork - Holden wins its final Bathurst 1000 Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

18:51

EP237 - S3

9 Oct 22

Treasurer Jim Chalmers on what to expect on budget night.

Treasurer Jim Chalmers will deliver his first budget later this month. The 44-year-old has been tipped as ‘one to watch’ since he was a 20-something joining his local ALP branch. In this conversation, Treasurer Jim Chalmers and Jamila Rizvi discuss everything from the cost of living and housing prices, to childcare and the role of women, to climate change and why politicians never seem to talk about young people on budget night.  We discover what drives the country’s new main economic manager, whose advice does he listen to and how do you answer a question as big as how to spend everyone else 's money? THE WEEKEND LIST: WATCH:  Welcome to Wrexham – Disney+ DO: Spring Fling – The Wheeler Centre Melbourne LISTEN: Matt & Alex – All Day Breakfast DO: Hijinx Hotel

Treasurer Jim Chalmers on what to expect on budget night.

Treasurer Jim Chalmers will deliver his first budget later this month. The 44-year-old has been tipped as ‘one to watch’ since he was a 20-something joining his local ALP branch. In this conversation, Treasurer Jim Chalmers and Jamila Rizvi discuss everything from the cost of living and housing prices, to childcare and the role of women, to climate change and why politicians never seem to talk about young people on budget night.  We discover what drives the country’s new main economic manager, whose advice does he listen to and how do you answer a question as big as how to spend everyone else 's money? THE WEEKEND LIST: WATCH:  Welcome to Wrexham – Disney+ DO: Spring Fling – The Wheeler Centre Melbourne LISTEN: Matt & Alex – All Day Breakfast DO: Hijinx Hotel

27:57

EP236 - S3

7 Oct 22

Stolen artefacts given back but looting continues

Today’s Briefing is about returning artefacts to their rightful owners. From skulls to statues and super rare antiquities; nations, like Australia are starting to return artefacts to the countries they were stolen from. We’re joined by Dr Craig Barker - an archaeologist, and the Manager of Education and Public Programs at the Chau Chak Wing Museum at Sydney Uni. Craig explains how and why the hand backs are occurring, and what role Australia has to play in correcting its injustices.  In today’s Briefing, giving back stolen artefacts... and why there’s more looting than ever in some parts of the world.   Headlines: - Higgins admits recording discussion with senior minister - Investigation launched into Thai mass shooting  - More heavy rain adds to flood risks - Fraudster Caddick's $2m jewellery collection to be sold off Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Stolen artefacts given back but looting continues

Today’s Briefing is about returning artefacts to their rightful owners. From skulls to statues and super rare antiquities; nations, like Australia are starting to return artefacts to the countries they were stolen from. We’re joined by Dr Craig Barker - an archaeologist, and the Manager of Education and Public Programs at the Chau Chak Wing Museum at Sydney Uni. Craig explains how and why the hand backs are occurring, and what role Australia has to play in correcting its injustices.  In today’s Briefing, giving back stolen artefacts... and why there’s more looting than ever in some parts of the world.   Headlines: - Higgins admits recording discussion with senior minister - Investigation launched into Thai mass shooting  - More heavy rain adds to flood risks - Fraudster Caddick's $2m jewellery collection to be sold off Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

18:51

EP235 - S3

6 Oct 22

You’ve heard of toxic masculinity, but what is positive masculinity?

When it comes to discussions of men and gender, it’s almost impossible to avoid saying or hearing the term toxic masculinity. It’s recently become a zeitgeisty and catch-all explanation for all instances of poor male behaviour. But are we too quick to reach for it as a label given no one has agreed what the phrase actually means? And if we no longer want “boy to be boys,” what exactly do we expect of them?  Hunter Johnson is the founder and CEO of Man Cave, an emotional intelligence charity that is taking on toxic masculinity. He’s worked with 30,000 young Aussie men too and is encouraging them to embrace a new kind of masculinity.  Headlines: - Sydney to break rain record - PM to reset relations with Solomon Islands - Alec Baldwin reaches settlement over shooting - Essendon: Thorburn issues statement after quitting - Details emerge of Brad Pitt’s alleged abuse Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

You’ve heard of toxic masculinity, but what is positive masculinity?

When it comes to discussions of men and gender, it’s almost impossible to avoid saying or hearing the term toxic masculinity. It’s recently become a zeitgeisty and catch-all explanation for all instances of poor male behaviour. But are we too quick to reach for it as a label given no one has agreed what the phrase actually means? And if we no longer want “boy to be boys,” what exactly do we expect of them?  Hunter Johnson is the founder and CEO of Man Cave, an emotional intelligence charity that is taking on toxic masculinity. He’s worked with 30,000 young Aussie men too and is encouraging them to embrace a new kind of masculinity.  Headlines: - Sydney to break rain record - PM to reset relations with Solomon Islands - Alec Baldwin reaches settlement over shooting - Essendon: Thorburn issues statement after quitting - Details emerge of Brad Pitt’s alleged abuse Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

20:31

EP234 - S3

5 Oct 22

How to make vaping uncool

It’s an age-old question for adults: how to get the message through to teenagers that something they think is cool is actually dangerous, and they should stop doing it? We did it with smoking, now the challenge for this generation of teachers and parents is vaping. Griffith University is looking to change that, they’ve created a gamified experience called The Vape Detective that will help inform students about the dangers of vaping and challenge their perspectives. We speak to Associate professor Coral Gartner from Griffith Uni who takes us through their program  - and Timo Dietrich who’s the co-founder of Blurred minds who has developed a vaping game to discourage teenagers from taking it up. On today's Briefing: the fight against vaping. Headlines: - Bruce Lehrmann trial gets underway - Government reveals conservation plan - Banks to pass on rate hike - Essendon CEO quits after one day Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

How to make vaping uncool

It’s an age-old question for adults: how to get the message through to teenagers that something they think is cool is actually dangerous, and they should stop doing it? We did it with smoking, now the challenge for this generation of teachers and parents is vaping. Griffith University is looking to change that, they’ve created a gamified experience called The Vape Detective that will help inform students about the dangers of vaping and challenge their perspectives. We speak to Associate professor Coral Gartner from Griffith Uni who takes us through their program  - and Timo Dietrich who’s the co-founder of Blurred minds who has developed a vaping game to discourage teenagers from taking it up. On today's Briefing: the fight against vaping. Headlines: - Bruce Lehrmann trial gets underway - Government reveals conservation plan - Banks to pass on rate hike - Essendon CEO quits after one day Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

22:31

EP233 - S3

4 Oct 22

Patagonia founder gives away his company

The owner of the $3B outdoor apparel brand Patagonia has given his company away to fight climate change.   Depending on his profits around $100m a year will go towards climate initiatives. We find out more about the move and why it’s so rare to see a company founder do something like this.  To explain how Yvon Chouinard’s radical act of philanthropy works. We have New York Times reporter David Gelles on the line from upstate New York. Headlines: - Interest rate hike on the cards - Rain forecast for the east - First day of Brittany Higgins trial - Optus reveals full extent of hack Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

Patagonia founder gives away his company

The owner of the $3B outdoor apparel brand Patagonia has given his company away to fight climate change.   Depending on his profits around $100m a year will go towards climate initiatives. We find out more about the move and why it’s so rare to see a company founder do something like this.  To explain how Yvon Chouinard’s radical act of philanthropy works. We have New York Times reporter David Gelles on the line from upstate New York. Headlines: - Interest rate hike on the cards - Rain forecast for the east - First day of Brittany Higgins trial - Optus reveals full extent of hack Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

21:36

EP232 - S3

3 Oct 22

BookTok: How TikTok is changing what you’re reading

What is the BookTok phenomenon? Is it making reading cool? And how is it affecting book sales? There’s been a big surge in book sales, and publishers are putting it down to a new phenomenon called BookTok. BookTok is where young people on TikTok, typically in their teens or early twenties post about their favourite books in emotional videos racking up millions of views. BookTok has been responsible for the resurgence of several books on the New York Times’ bestseller list, including E. Lockhart’s "We Were Liars." We speak with E. Lockhart about BookTok and how it’s encouraged her to write its prequel "Family of Liars." Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

BookTok: How TikTok is changing what you’re reading

What is the BookTok phenomenon? Is it making reading cool? And how is it affecting book sales? There’s been a big surge in book sales, and publishers are putting it down to a new phenomenon called BookTok. BookTok is where young people on TikTok, typically in their teens or early twenties post about their favourite books in emotional videos racking up millions of views. BookTok has been responsible for the resurgence of several books on the New York Times’ bestseller list, including E. Lockhart’s "We Were Liars." We speak with E. Lockhart about BookTok and how it’s encouraged her to write its prequel "Family of Liars." Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

16:31

EP231 - S3

2 Oct 22

Louise Milligan and the brutal cost of justice

Louise Milligan is an investigative reporter for 7.30 and Four Corners on the ABC, Louise Milligan’s job is to uncover and explore the complicated, often disturbing realities of Australia’s most high profile political and legal stories. In this conversation, Jamila Rizvi and Louise Milligan explore the personal cost to the high profile, high stakes nature of investigative journalism, what it’s like being “the news”, rather than reporting on it and Louise’s illustrious career journey. You can check out the new Four Corners episode on October 3rd on ABC or catch up on iView.  THE WEEKEND LIST: DO:  Local trivia Night WATCH: Heartbreak High – Netflix WATCH: Do Revenge – Netflix   LISTEN: The Drop Podcast CONTENT WARNING: BRIEF MENTION OF SUICIDE. IF YOU OR SOMEONE YOU KNOW NEEDS HELP, PLEASE CALL LIFELINE ON 13 11 14 . Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

Louise Milligan and the brutal cost of justice

Louise Milligan is an investigative reporter for 7.30 and Four Corners on the ABC, Louise Milligan’s job is to uncover and explore the complicated, often disturbing realities of Australia’s most high profile political and legal stories. In this conversation, Jamila Rizvi and Louise Milligan explore the personal cost to the high profile, high stakes nature of investigative journalism, what it’s like being “the news”, rather than reporting on it and Louise’s illustrious career journey. You can check out the new Four Corners episode on October 3rd on ABC or catch up on iView.  THE WEEKEND LIST: DO:  Local trivia Night WATCH: Heartbreak High – Netflix WATCH: Do Revenge – Netflix   LISTEN: The Drop Podcast CONTENT WARNING: BRIEF MENTION OF SUICIDE. IF YOU OR SOMEONE YOU KNOW NEEDS HELP, PLEASE CALL LIFELINE ON 13 11 14 . Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

30:24

EP230 - S3

30 Sep 22

What is going on in Iran?

What’s happening in Iran? We look into the death of Iranian woman Mahsa Amini and why it’s causing so much anger in Iran and around the world.  We chat to Naz Almasi, who was arrested at the age of 18 for participating in protests in Iran. She is deeply concerned about her friends and family who have no way of communicating with the outside world with intermittent or no internet access. Naz says "any act of protest is illegal and it has very violent consequences" and wants the international community and leaders to act. Headlines: - Covid isolation could be scrapped - Russia to announce its annexation of parts of Ukraine - Australian advisor to Myanmar sentenced - Coolio has died age 59 - Queen’s death revealed - Indigenous voice referendum to be held in next financial year Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

What is going on in Iran?

What’s happening in Iran? We look into the death of Iranian woman Mahsa Amini and why it’s causing so much anger in Iran and around the world.  We chat to Naz Almasi, who was arrested at the age of 18 for participating in protests in Iran. She is deeply concerned about her friends and family who have no way of communicating with the outside world with intermittent or no internet access. Naz says "any act of protest is illegal and it has very violent consequences" and wants the international community and leaders to act. Headlines: - Covid isolation could be scrapped - Russia to announce its annexation of parts of Ukraine - Australian advisor to Myanmar sentenced - Coolio has died age 59 - Queen’s death revealed - Indigenous voice referendum to be held in next financial year Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU

22:47

EP229 - S3

29 Sep 22

Dangerous or desperate? Putin's double down in Ukraine

Last week Vladimir Putin announced that he was calling up 300k reservists to fight in the war in Ukraine and is threatening nuclear action once again.  So how concerned should we be, and is Putin "a cornered rat?" We speak to Peter Hartcher, the international editor of The Age and SMH newspapers and ask has Vladimir Putin become more dangerous, more desperate or both?  Headlines: - Albo promises cybersecurity overhaul - Hawks: Clarkson concerned about fair process - 50k sign petition to keep name of Maroondah hospital - Nicho Hynes named Dally M winner Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

Dangerous or desperate? Putin's double down in Ukraine

Last week Vladimir Putin announced that he was calling up 300k reservists to fight in the war in Ukraine and is threatening nuclear action once again.  So how concerned should we be, and is Putin "a cornered rat?" We speak to Peter Hartcher, the international editor of The Age and SMH newspapers and ask has Vladimir Putin become more dangerous, more desperate or both?  Headlines: - Albo promises cybersecurity overhaul - Hawks: Clarkson concerned about fair process - 50k sign petition to keep name of Maroondah hospital - Nicho Hynes named Dally M winner Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

20:16

EP228 - S3

28 Sep 22

Where are the conservative women going?

Charlotte Mortlock - Former Sky News journalist, is behind the drive called Hilma's Network to get more women in politics.  Mortlock thinks more women need to be involved in the Liberal party at a grass roots level for change to occur at the top.  The former journo decided to start a network with one goal: flood the Liberal party with women and bring young women back to the conservative side of politics. Headlines: - States act to help Optus customers get new IDs  - Nation anti-corruption commission legislation to be introduced today - Moscow sham elections have 96% wanting to be part of Russia - Fuel excise cut to end - NASA Space craft smashes into an asteroid Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

Where are the conservative women going?

Charlotte Mortlock - Former Sky News journalist, is behind the drive called Hilma's Network to get more women in politics.  Mortlock thinks more women need to be involved in the Liberal party at a grass roots level for change to occur at the top.  The former journo decided to start a network with one goal: flood the Liberal party with women and bring young women back to the conservative side of politics. Headlines: - States act to help Optus customers get new IDs  - Nation anti-corruption commission legislation to be introduced today - Moscow sham elections have 96% wanting to be part of Russia - Fuel excise cut to end - NASA Space craft smashes into an asteroid Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

18:45

EP227 - S3

27 Sep 22

Has the Bali bombmaker been deradicalised?

On the eve of the 20th anniversary of the Bali bombings, the bombmaker Umar Patek became eligible for parole.  Patek had his sentence reduced last month with Indonesian authorities claiming he’s been “deradicalised.” Patek has served 11 of his 20-year sentence for mixing chemicals used in the attacks that killed 202 people in 2002.  We find out what’s involved in a deradicalisation program with Greg Barton, a Professor in Global Islamic Politics from Deakin University, and whether they can actually work. Headlines: - Optus could face class action - Gambling ad crackdown - ADHD could end up on NDIS - School shooting in Russia - Australia plays major role in NASA experiment Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

Has the Bali bombmaker been deradicalised?

On the eve of the 20th anniversary of the Bali bombings, the bombmaker Umar Patek became eligible for parole.  Patek had his sentence reduced last month with Indonesian authorities claiming he’s been “deradicalised.” Patek has served 11 of his 20-year sentence for mixing chemicals used in the attacks that killed 202 people in 2002.  We find out what’s involved in a deradicalisation program with Greg Barton, a Professor in Global Islamic Politics from Deakin University, and whether they can actually work. Headlines: - Optus could face class action - Gambling ad crackdown - ADHD could end up on NDIS - School shooting in Russia - Australia plays major role in NASA experiment Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

21:01

EP226 - S3

26 Sep 22

Mystery USB stick reveals cosmetic surgery nightmare

They have been dubbed "cosmetic cowboys" and now the federal government is reining them in. Antoinette Lattouf talks to investigative journalist Adele Ferguson about the numerous patients that have spoken out about the painful and permanent damage they have suffered due to poor practices in Australia's cosmetic surgery industry. And their stories have not been in vain.  Health ministers across the country have now agreed to a series of reforms to clean up the sector to ensure doctors providing cosmetic procedures are appropriately qualified and working to the highest health and safety standards. Headlines: - NSW still on flood watch - Former surf star Chris Davidson dies after an alleged one punch attack - Perth man behind bars in Bali for alleged drug smuggling - Woman hit by rollercoaster at Melbourne Royal Show - It’s been a mega weekend of sport Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

Mystery USB stick reveals cosmetic surgery nightmare

They have been dubbed "cosmetic cowboys" and now the federal government is reining them in. Antoinette Lattouf talks to investigative journalist Adele Ferguson about the numerous patients that have spoken out about the painful and permanent damage they have suffered due to poor practices in Australia's cosmetic surgery industry. And their stories have not been in vain.  Health ministers across the country have now agreed to a series of reforms to clean up the sector to ensure doctors providing cosmetic procedures are appropriately qualified and working to the highest health and safety standards. Headlines: - NSW still on flood watch - Former surf star Chris Davidson dies after an alleged one punch attack - Perth man behind bars in Bali for alleged drug smuggling - Woman hit by rollercoaster at Melbourne Royal Show - It’s been a mega weekend of sport Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

20:43

EP225 - S3

25 Sep 22

Nakkiah Lui’s biggest role yet

Nakkiah Lui is an actor, writer and comedian. She is a Gamilaroi and Torres Strait Islander woman who is well known as a passionate, determined advocate for the rights and equality of First Nations people. She has an outstanding number of artistic achievements. You will recognise her from TV shows including Black Comedy, Preppers, Kiki and Kitty and Get Krackin or follow her witty, acerbic takes on Twitter. In this conversation Jamila Rizvi and Nakkiah Lui discuss everything from motherhood, diversity in the Australian media and the backlash of portraying fictional characters.  THE WEEKEND LIST: DO: ⚠️ BeReal App ⚠️ DO: Follow Instagram page - @pizza_night_ READ: The Real Story of the Birth of Fall Out Boy - Rolling Stone DO: BIG4 Holiday Park  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

Nakkiah Lui’s biggest role yet

Nakkiah Lui is an actor, writer and comedian. She is a Gamilaroi and Torres Strait Islander woman who is well known as a passionate, determined advocate for the rights and equality of First Nations people. She has an outstanding number of artistic achievements. You will recognise her from TV shows including Black Comedy, Preppers, Kiki and Kitty and Get Krackin or follow her witty, acerbic takes on Twitter. In this conversation Jamila Rizvi and Nakkiah Lui discuss everything from motherhood, diversity in the Australian media and the backlash of portraying fictional characters.  THE WEEKEND LIST: DO: ⚠️ BeReal App ⚠️ DO: Follow Instagram page - @pizza_night_ READ: The Real Story of the Birth of Fall Out Boy - Rolling Stone DO: BIG4 Holiday Park  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

30:49

EP224 - S3

23 Sep 22

The Aussie invention that lets you type using your mind

Imagine you could control digital devices using just the power of thought. Although it’s a little more complex than that, an implantable brain-computer interface is essentially trying to do just that.  There have been some promising trials in New York where, in a world-first, a person who is severely paralysed was implanted with this new brain-computer technology. Now 20 patients in Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane and Gold Coast are getting onboard. Professor Nicholas Opie is a biomedical engineer and he’s also the co-founder of this new technology the Stentrode implant Headlines: - The Queen’s memorial day wraps up - Russians flee after Putin announces conscription - Optus investigates major hack - Hawthorn allegations rock AFL Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

The Aussie invention that lets you type using your mind

Imagine you could control digital devices using just the power of thought. Although it’s a little more complex than that, an implantable brain-computer interface is essentially trying to do just that.  There have been some promising trials in New York where, in a world-first, a person who is severely paralysed was implanted with this new brain-computer technology. Now 20 patients in Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane and Gold Coast are getting onboard. Professor Nicholas Opie is a biomedical engineer and he’s also the co-founder of this new technology the Stentrode implant Headlines: - The Queen’s memorial day wraps up - Russians flee after Putin announces conscription - Optus investigates major hack - Hawthorn allegations rock AFL Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

22:04

EP223 - S3

22 Sep 22

Why are crime rates falling?

Did you know crime statistics in Australia have been steadily falling over the last 20 years. We are now living arguably some of our safest lives ever. We speak with former director of the NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research, Don Weatherburn about how this has happened, and why our perception of crime could be out of whack. Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

Why are crime rates falling?

Did you know crime statistics in Australia have been steadily falling over the last 20 years. We are now living arguably some of our safest lives ever. We speak with former director of the NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research, Don Weatherburn about how this has happened, and why our perception of crime could be out of whack. Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

18:45

EP222 - S3

21 Sep 22

The campaign to bring back the Tasmanian Tiger

A campaign has been launched to bring back the Tasmanian Tiger; the carnivorous marsupial extinct in Australia since the 1930s. Despite hundreds of sightings in ensuing years, the Tassie Tiger – or thylacine – is now a distant memory. Colossal Biosciences is a tech and investment company in the US – and it’s recruited people like Paris Hilton and the Hemsworth brothers to invest in its project to re-wild the Tassie Tiger.  We’re joined by Ben Lamm, founder and CEO of Colossal Biosciences who explains why they chose the thylacine – and what it would mean for Tasmania’s native animal population and environment, if it’s re-introduced to the wilds of the Apple Isle.  In today’s Briefing, the campaign to bring back the Tasmanian Tiger.  Headlines: - Podcast triggers release on Adnan Syed - $50b windfall for federal budget - QLD government to look into forensic lab results - Flooding forecast for east coast Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

The campaign to bring back the Tasmanian Tiger

A campaign has been launched to bring back the Tasmanian Tiger; the carnivorous marsupial extinct in Australia since the 1930s. Despite hundreds of sightings in ensuing years, the Tassie Tiger – or thylacine – is now a distant memory. Colossal Biosciences is a tech and investment company in the US – and it’s recruited people like Paris Hilton and the Hemsworth brothers to invest in its project to re-wild the Tassie Tiger.  We’re joined by Ben Lamm, founder and CEO of Colossal Biosciences who explains why they chose the thylacine – and what it would mean for Tasmania’s native animal population and environment, if it’s re-introduced to the wilds of the Apple Isle.  In today’s Briefing, the campaign to bring back the Tasmanian Tiger.  Headlines: - Podcast triggers release on Adnan Syed - $50b windfall for federal budget - QLD government to look into forensic lab results - Flooding forecast for east coast Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

21:25

EP221 - S3

20 Sep 22

Pre-bunking: how to identify misinformation

Google is trying out pre-bunking techniques in a number of eastern European countries after a study found pre-bunking helped ‘inoculate’ people against misinformation.  The study showed 30,000 participants cartoons explaining some of the most common manipulation techniques- and later asked them about the tactics.  We speak with Jon Roozenbeek, lead author of the study and a postdoctoral fellow at Cambridge University’s Social Decision-Making Lab about how the study works and if this could help fight the deluge of misinformation online. Headlines: - The Queen is laid to rest - States scrap masks on public transport  - QLD police to stop using spithoods - Japan typhoon downgraded Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

Pre-bunking: how to identify misinformation

Google is trying out pre-bunking techniques in a number of eastern European countries after a study found pre-bunking helped ‘inoculate’ people against misinformation.  The study showed 30,000 participants cartoons explaining some of the most common manipulation techniques- and later asked them about the tactics.  We speak with Jon Roozenbeek, lead author of the study and a postdoctoral fellow at Cambridge University’s Social Decision-Making Lab about how the study works and if this could help fight the deluge of misinformation online. Headlines: - The Queen is laid to rest - States scrap masks on public transport  - QLD police to stop using spithoods - Japan typhoon downgraded Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

22:03

EP220 - S3

19 Sep 22

Indigenous perspectives on the Queen’s funeral

The Queen’s funeral is tonight and it’s expected to be the most-watched television event of all time. Four billion people are expected to tune in. It will be the end of an era in Australia with King Charles III taking over from his mother. So what will it mean for Indigenous Australians? Our very own Rhianna Patrick, a Torres Strait Islander, tells us about her connection with the Queen and how growing up, she had a fascination with the monarch and royal family. We’re also joined by Blak Douglas, an Indigenous artist who won this year’s Archibald Prize, who has an entirely different perspective. He says Australia’s continued support for the monarchy is salt in the wounds of First Nations people. In this episode of the Briefing, Indigenous perspectives on the Queen’s funeral Headlines: - The Queen's funeral tonight - A massive typhoon has made landfall in Japan - Australia's biggest Childcare provider is offering incentives to entice workers - Patrick Cripps takes home the Brownlow medal  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

Indigenous perspectives on the Queen’s funeral

The Queen’s funeral is tonight and it’s expected to be the most-watched television event of all time. Four billion people are expected to tune in. It will be the end of an era in Australia with King Charles III taking over from his mother. So what will it mean for Indigenous Australians? Our very own Rhianna Patrick, a Torres Strait Islander, tells us about her connection with the Queen and how growing up, she had a fascination with the monarch and royal family. We’re also joined by Blak Douglas, an Indigenous artist who won this year’s Archibald Prize, who has an entirely different perspective. He says Australia’s continued support for the monarchy is salt in the wounds of First Nations people. In this episode of the Briefing, Indigenous perspectives on the Queen’s funeral Headlines: - The Queen's funeral tonight - A massive typhoon has made landfall in Japan - Australia's biggest Childcare provider is offering incentives to entice workers - Patrick Cripps takes home the Brownlow medal  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

20:45

EP219 - S3

18 Sep 22

Hugh Van Cuylenburg is a resilient work in progress.

Hugh Van Cuylenburg is a bestselling author and co-host of the popular podcast, The Imperfects. Hugh works in the area of resilience, through his podcast and books, he’s worked with everyone from school kids to football stars on how to live a more resilient life. In this conversation Jamila Rizvi and Hugh Van Cuylenburg discuss embracing the current season of your life, the power of resilience and the importance of everyone, but men in particular, sharing their emotions and allowing each other to be vulnerable. THE WEEKEND LIST: WATCH: Me Time (Netflix) DO: Finalist 2022 Australian Life Photography Competition in Hyde Park 15th Sept – 9thOct DO: Get a Frank Green Water bottle and stay hydrated! LISTEN: The Imperfects - Podcast Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

Hugh Van Cuylenburg is a resilient work in progress.

Hugh Van Cuylenburg is a bestselling author and co-host of the popular podcast, The Imperfects. Hugh works in the area of resilience, through his podcast and books, he’s worked with everyone from school kids to football stars on how to live a more resilient life. In this conversation Jamila Rizvi and Hugh Van Cuylenburg discuss embracing the current season of your life, the power of resilience and the importance of everyone, but men in particular, sharing their emotions and allowing each other to be vulnerable. THE WEEKEND LIST: WATCH: Me Time (Netflix) DO: Finalist 2022 Australian Life Photography Competition in Hyde Park 15th Sept – 9thOct DO: Get a Frank Green Water bottle and stay hydrated! LISTEN: The Imperfects - Podcast Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

27:59

EP218 - S3

16 Sep 22

ARIA Awards respond to accusations of institutional racism

Rapper Tasman Keith says the ARIA Awards should be judged on art, not charts. Is he right?  Keith posted a lengthy explainer on how the ARIA Awards are not based on merit, they’re based on sales this week.  ARIA CEO Annabelle Herd joins us to explain why those claims are not quite right, but the awards could do more to acknowledge artists who fly under the radar.  We’re also joined by ARIA judge and music journo Sosefina Fuamoli, who says the awards probably don’t adequately recognise artists who don’t have big record company backing. It’s a complicated issue.  In today’s Briefing, Tasman Keith says the ARIA Awards should be judged on art, not charts. Is he right?  Headlines: - Roger Federer announces retirement - William says Queen's procession reminded him of Diana's - Xi and Putin meet in Uzbekistan - WHO says end of pandemic in sight Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

ARIA Awards respond to accusations of institutional racism

Rapper Tasman Keith says the ARIA Awards should be judged on art, not charts. Is he right?  Keith posted a lengthy explainer on how the ARIA Awards are not based on merit, they’re based on sales this week.  ARIA CEO Annabelle Herd joins us to explain why those claims are not quite right, but the awards could do more to acknowledge artists who fly under the radar.  We’re also joined by ARIA judge and music journo Sosefina Fuamoli, who says the awards probably don’t adequately recognise artists who don’t have big record company backing. It’s a complicated issue.  In today’s Briefing, Tasman Keith says the ARIA Awards should be judged on art, not charts. Is he right?  Headlines: - Roger Federer announces retirement - William says Queen's procession reminded him of Diana's - Xi and Putin meet in Uzbekistan - WHO says end of pandemic in sight Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

20:29

EP217 - S3

15 Sep 22

Six months of Russian sanctions: the real impact

Since Russia invaded Ukraine, a wide range of sanctions has been imposed by western countries. Sanctions are penalties imposed by one country on another, to stop it acting aggressively, or breaking international law.     We’re joined by David Uren - an economic analyst and commentator with the Australian   Strategic Policy Institute - to determine the real impact of the sanctions. In today’s Briefing we take a deep dive on the real impact of six months of sanctions imposed on Russia over its invasion of Ukraine. Headlines: - Mourners pay respects to the queen - Pandemic payments extended - Saudi golf tournament could come to Australia - 900k Aussies hold down two jobs - RBA board under review Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

Six months of Russian sanctions: the real impact

Since Russia invaded Ukraine, a wide range of sanctions has been imposed by western countries. Sanctions are penalties imposed by one country on another, to stop it acting aggressively, or breaking international law.     We’re joined by David Uren - an economic analyst and commentator with the Australian   Strategic Policy Institute - to determine the real impact of the sanctions. In today’s Briefing we take a deep dive on the real impact of six months of sanctions imposed on Russia over its invasion of Ukraine. Headlines: - Mourners pay respects to the queen - Pandemic payments extended - Saudi golf tournament could come to Australia - 900k Aussies hold down two jobs - RBA board under review Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

21:57

EP216 - S3

14 Sep 22

Do you know the real Charles, the person behind the crown?

We have now entered the realm of King Charles III. To many, Charles is an eccentric environmentalist whose relationship with his first wife Diana filled tabloids and documentaries for decades.  Now he’s ascended the throne on his mother’s death, we take a deep dive on the man himself with Dr Cindy McCreery, a historian with the University of Sydney and an expert on the history of the Royal Family.   In today’s Briefing, Australia has a new King. Do you know the real Charles, the person behind the crown? Headlines: - The Queen’s coffin arrives in London - Uncle Jack Charles dies - Third La Nina confirmed  - Pet kangaroo kills owner - Aussie actor Murray Bartlett wins an Emmy Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

Do you know the real Charles, the person behind the crown?

We have now entered the realm of King Charles III. To many, Charles is an eccentric environmentalist whose relationship with his first wife Diana filled tabloids and documentaries for decades.  Now he’s ascended the throne on his mother’s death, we take a deep dive on the man himself with Dr Cindy McCreery, a historian with the University of Sydney and an expert on the history of the Royal Family.   In today’s Briefing, Australia has a new King. Do you know the real Charles, the person behind the crown? Headlines: - The Queen’s coffin arrives in London - Uncle Jack Charles dies - Third La Nina confirmed  - Pet kangaroo kills owner - Aussie actor Murray Bartlett wins an Emmy Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

22:42

EP215 - S3

13 Sep 22

How to not worry in chaotic times

With the Queen’s death last week, the world woke to a new generation. We have a new King, a new heir to the throne and many expect conversations to begin about Australia’s future in the Commonwealth. What should you do if you feel unsure about the future? In today’s episode of the Briefing, we’re joined by Brigid Delaney whose new book Reasons Not To Worry - How to Be Stoic in Chaotic Times, comes out next week. Brigid explains what we can learn from stoics, philosophers who lived by a set of rules that helped them find solace and comfort in difficult times. As Australia – and the world – enters a new era, we talk about Stoicism and why worrying is simply a waste of time. Today's Headlines: - King Charles admits to feeling ‘weight of history’ - New Covid vaccine approved by ATAGI - Caddick inquiry hears unlikely she cut off own foot Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

How to not worry in chaotic times

With the Queen’s death last week, the world woke to a new generation. We have a new King, a new heir to the throne and many expect conversations to begin about Australia’s future in the Commonwealth. What should you do if you feel unsure about the future? In today’s episode of the Briefing, we’re joined by Brigid Delaney whose new book Reasons Not To Worry - How to Be Stoic in Chaotic Times, comes out next week. Brigid explains what we can learn from stoics, philosophers who lived by a set of rules that helped them find solace and comfort in difficult times. As Australia – and the world – enters a new era, we talk about Stoicism and why worrying is simply a waste of time. Today's Headlines: - King Charles admits to feeling ‘weight of history’ - New Covid vaccine approved by ATAGI - Caddick inquiry hears unlikely she cut off own foot Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

20:34

EP214 - S3

12 Sep 22

The Queen's final journey explained

The Queen’s body has begun its journey from Scotland to England. Tens of thousands of Britons lined the highways of Scotland overnight to watch the Queen’s cortege from Balmoral Castle to Holyrood House in Edinburgh where her body will lie in state for a day before being taken to London. We’re joined by Jacob Farr from Edinburgh Live who can take us through the ins and outs of the Queen’s final journey. In today’s Briefing, the Queen’s final journey has begun. Today's Headlines: - Queen's cortege arrives in Edinburgh - King Charles III proclaimed in Australia - US commemorates 21 years since September 11 attacks - Massive earthquake in PNG Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

The Queen's final journey explained

The Queen’s body has begun its journey from Scotland to England. Tens of thousands of Britons lined the highways of Scotland overnight to watch the Queen’s cortege from Balmoral Castle to Holyrood House in Edinburgh where her body will lie in state for a day before being taken to London. We’re joined by Jacob Farr from Edinburgh Live who can take us through the ins and outs of the Queen’s final journey. In today’s Briefing, the Queen’s final journey has begun. Today's Headlines: - Queen's cortege arrives in Edinburgh - King Charles III proclaimed in Australia - US commemorates 21 years since September 11 attacks - Massive earthquake in PNG Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

22:16

EP213 - S3

11 Sep 22

Hannah Diviney is changing the world one lyric at a time

Two months ago Hannah Diviney wrote a tweet that went viral. Hannah was the driving force behind Lizzo and Beyonce, two of the most powerful and influential people in pop music, changing their lyrics which used an ablest slur.   Hannah Diviney is a writer and disability & women’s rights advocate. In this conversation Jamila Rizvi and Hannah Diviney unpack everything from pop stars, to cartoons, to the experience of life from a different vantage point. Sign the petition for Disney to create a princess with disabilities here: https://www.change.org/p/disneystudios-create-a-disney-princess-with-disabilities?original_footer_petition_id=14548521&algorithm=promoted&source_location=petition_footer&grid_position=7&pt=AVBldGl0aW9uACS4jgEAAAAAYNr34O0kCM8yOTc2MGYyOA%3D%3D THE WEEKEND LIST: WATCH: Brooklyn Nine-Nine (Netflix) DO: Melbourne Writers Festival DO: Liquidless Reed DiffusersDO: Follow disability advocates online! IG handles: @hannahthewildflower @_astridedwards_ @edesmarchelier @dylanalcott @elizahull @turiapitt @taramossauthor @dinesh.palipana Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

Hannah Diviney is changing the world one lyric at a time

Two months ago Hannah Diviney wrote a tweet that went viral. Hannah was the driving force behind Lizzo and Beyonce, two of the most powerful and influential people in pop music, changing their lyrics which used an ablest slur.   Hannah Diviney is a writer and disability & women’s rights advocate. In this conversation Jamila Rizvi and Hannah Diviney unpack everything from pop stars, to cartoons, to the experience of life from a different vantage point. Sign the petition for Disney to create a princess with disabilities here: https://www.change.org/p/disneystudios-create-a-disney-princess-with-disabilities?original_footer_petition_id=14548521&algorithm=promoted&source_location=petition_footer&grid_position=7&pt=AVBldGl0aW9uACS4jgEAAAAAYNr34O0kCM8yOTc2MGYyOA%3D%3D THE WEEKEND LIST: WATCH: Brooklyn Nine-Nine (Netflix) DO: Melbourne Writers Festival DO: Liquidless Reed DiffusersDO: Follow disability advocates online! IG handles: @hannahthewildflower @_astridedwards_ @edesmarchelier @dylanalcott @elizahull @turiapitt @taramossauthor @dinesh.palipana Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

33:20

EP212 - S3

9 Sep 22

The Queen has died aged 96

In today’s Briefing, we bring you the news that Queen Elizabeth has died aged 96. Buckingham Palace made the official announcement at 6.30pm British time -  3.30am this morning our time. Her majesty was Britain’s longest-serving monarch. The Queen, born in Mayfair, London on April 21, 1926, died at Balmoral Castle in Scotland. In this special episode of the Briefing, we remember Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth the Second.

The Queen has died aged 96

In today’s Briefing, we bring you the news that Queen Elizabeth has died aged 96. Buckingham Palace made the official announcement at 6.30pm British time -  3.30am this morning our time. Her majesty was Britain’s longest-serving monarch. The Queen, born in Mayfair, London on April 21, 1926, died at Balmoral Castle in Scotland. In this special episode of the Briefing, we remember Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth the Second.

30:46

EP211 - S3

8 Sep 22

Online child abuse: why Australia’s the test case

It’s National Child Protection Week. Australian authorities have served Apple, Microsoft and Meta with world-first legal orders this week to come clean on what they are doing to detect and report child sex abuse material or face fines of more than half a million dollars a day. Australia’s move will be watched internationally- in the US, there has been bitter debate over whether child security should trump privacy. We speak to filmmaker Simon Nasht about the orders, about the potential implications and why the world is watching. Simon’s film The Children in the Pictures is available at SBS OnDemand and will be featured on SBS in late October.  Today's Headlines: - Putin threatens to cut energy to west  - New figures show economy grew 0.9% - Major update in Trump archive seizure - Domestic flight fares surge - No Aussies left in US Open Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

Online child abuse: why Australia’s the test case

It’s National Child Protection Week. Australian authorities have served Apple, Microsoft and Meta with world-first legal orders this week to come clean on what they are doing to detect and report child sex abuse material or face fines of more than half a million dollars a day. Australia’s move will be watched internationally- in the US, there has been bitter debate over whether child security should trump privacy. We speak to filmmaker Simon Nasht about the orders, about the potential implications and why the world is watching. Simon’s film The Children in the Pictures is available at SBS OnDemand and will be featured on SBS in late October.  Today's Headlines: - Putin threatens to cut energy to west  - New figures show economy grew 0.9% - Major update in Trump archive seizure - Domestic flight fares surge - No Aussies left in US Open Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

21:52

EP210 - S3

7 Sep 22

Badness: an ex top cop on why some people are evil

As a detective, Gary Jubelin used to sit on one side of the interview room table facing murderers, child abductors and rapists. Now he’s sitting on the other side: disgraced, forced out of the police and judged to be a criminal. His new book Badness, shows us the view from the other side. One of Australia’s most famous detectives has done a very different kind of investigation; instead of locking up criminals he’s befriended some of the country's worst criminals to understand what made them bad.  In today’s Briefing, Gary Jubelin, former NSW police homicide detective who is famous for leading the William Tryell investigation, and then being booted out of the force for illegal recordings, explains how and why his own criminal conviction has given him a very different perspective on the criminal mindset. His book Badness, is out today. Today's Headlines: - Early childhood centres to ‘shut down’ - Cost of living to be addressed in budget  - China tensions could be thawing - Liz Truss makes first speech Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

Badness: an ex top cop on why some people are evil

As a detective, Gary Jubelin used to sit on one side of the interview room table facing murderers, child abductors and rapists. Now he’s sitting on the other side: disgraced, forced out of the police and judged to be a criminal. His new book Badness, shows us the view from the other side. One of Australia’s most famous detectives has done a very different kind of investigation; instead of locking up criminals he’s befriended some of the country's worst criminals to understand what made them bad.  In today’s Briefing, Gary Jubelin, former NSW police homicide detective who is famous for leading the William Tryell investigation, and then being booted out of the force for illegal recordings, explains how and why his own criminal conviction has given him a very different perspective on the criminal mindset. His book Badness, is out today. Today's Headlines: - Early childhood centres to ‘shut down’ - Cost of living to be addressed in budget  - China tensions could be thawing - Liz Truss makes first speech Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

22:45

EP209 - S3

6 Sep 22

Japan reboots its nuclear reactors

Japan is planning a dramatic shift back to nuclear power more than a decade on from the Fukushima disaster. Prime Minister Fumio Kishida announced last week Japan will restart idle reactors and develop new plants to avoid new strains on power grids that buckled under heavy demand this summer.  We’re joined by Dr Carol Bond from RMIT, a political and social scientist with a focus on energy policy. In this episode of the Briefing, is Japan ready to transition back to nuclear energy, what are the risks, and what has it learned in the wake of the Fukushima disaster? Is Japan ready to transition back to nuclear energy? Today's Headlines: - Liz Truss to be new British PM - Manhunt continues in Canada after stabbing murder spree - Wayne Carey denies white powder is banned substance - Aussies through to US Open quarters after historic day in NY - Tracey Grimshaw to leave A Current Affair Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

Japan reboots its nuclear reactors

Japan is planning a dramatic shift back to nuclear power more than a decade on from the Fukushima disaster. Prime Minister Fumio Kishida announced last week Japan will restart idle reactors and develop new plants to avoid new strains on power grids that buckled under heavy demand this summer.  We’re joined by Dr Carol Bond from RMIT, a political and social scientist with a focus on energy policy. In this episode of the Briefing, is Japan ready to transition back to nuclear energy, what are the risks, and what has it learned in the wake of the Fukushima disaster? Is Japan ready to transition back to nuclear energy? Today's Headlines: - Liz Truss to be new British PM - Manhunt continues in Canada after stabbing murder spree - Wayne Carey denies white powder is banned substance - Aussies through to US Open quarters after historic day in NY - Tracey Grimshaw to leave A Current Affair Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

19:02

EP208 - S3

5 Sep 22

How your friends impact your bank balance

A new study has found friendships between rich and poor can reduce poverty. The study looked at thousands of social media connections and found if poor children grew up in neighbourhoods where 70% of their friends were wealthy, it would increase their future incomes by 20%. We’re joined by one of the study’s authors, Matthew O Jackson, a professor of Economics and Stanford University who explains how the study was conducted and what they found. In this episode of the Briefing, how your friends impact your bank balance. Today's Headlines: - 5 million to benefit from welfare increases - Climate bill debate begins today - Trump holds first rally since FBI raid - Kyrgios to take on Medvedev in bid for US Open quarters - Nirvana wins court case over baby photo Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

How your friends impact your bank balance

A new study has found friendships between rich and poor can reduce poverty. The study looked at thousands of social media connections and found if poor children grew up in neighbourhoods where 70% of their friends were wealthy, it would increase their future incomes by 20%. We’re joined by one of the study’s authors, Matthew O Jackson, a professor of Economics and Stanford University who explains how the study was conducted and what they found. In this episode of the Briefing, how your friends impact your bank balance. Today's Headlines: - 5 million to benefit from welfare increases - Climate bill debate begins today - Trump holds first rally since FBI raid - Kyrgios to take on Medvedev in bid for US Open quarters - Nirvana wins court case over baby photo Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

22:04

EP207 - S3

4 Sep 22

Johnny Ruffo & Jamila Rizvi have something surprising in common

Johnny Ruffo is an Australian singer, songwriter, dancer, actor, television personality and now a newly minted author, with his memoir No Finish Line.   Johnny auditioned for X-Factor Australia in 2011 on a whim and after placing third signed a recording contract with Sony. He won Dancing with the Stars the following year, released a debut single and joined the cast of Home and Away. Then Johnny started suffering from severe headaches, and after emergency surgery, woke up and was told he has brain cancer. By 2019 he was in remission but in 2020 the cancer returned. Five years on and he is still fighting - and he’s fighting to win. In this conversation Jamila Rizvi and Johnny Ruffo discuss Johnny’s rise to super stardom, his on-going battle with brain cancer and discover they have something surprising in common.  THE WEEKEND LIST: WATCH: Have You Been Paying Attention? – Monday’s at 8:30pm Channel 10 or TenPlay   WATCH: House of the Dragon – BINGE LISTEN: Where should we begin? With Esther Perel  EAT: Rice Paper Puff Recipe  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

Johnny Ruffo & Jamila Rizvi have something surprising in common

Johnny Ruffo is an Australian singer, songwriter, dancer, actor, television personality and now a newly minted author, with his memoir No Finish Line.   Johnny auditioned for X-Factor Australia in 2011 on a whim and after placing third signed a recording contract with Sony. He won Dancing with the Stars the following year, released a debut single and joined the cast of Home and Away. Then Johnny started suffering from severe headaches, and after emergency surgery, woke up and was told he has brain cancer. By 2019 he was in remission but in 2020 the cancer returned. Five years on and he is still fighting - and he’s fighting to win. In this conversation Jamila Rizvi and Johnny Ruffo discuss Johnny’s rise to super stardom, his on-going battle with brain cancer and discover they have something surprising in common.  THE WEEKEND LIST: WATCH: Have You Been Paying Attention? – Monday’s at 8:30pm Channel 10 or TenPlay   WATCH: House of the Dragon – BINGE LISTEN: Where should we begin? With Esther Perel  EAT: Rice Paper Puff Recipe  Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

27:06

EP206 - S3

2 Sep 22

Where the big money is

Could your next job be in tech? Job shortages are hitting the Australian economy hard, mostly in lower-skilled lower-paid jobs. One sector is bucking the trend; the tech sector is growing, with the number of jobs set to triple while salaries are growing strongly. We talk to Australia Tech Council deputy CEO Tom McMahon to get to the bottom of why Australia is so bad at tech. Dude, where’s my tech job?  Addressing chronic shortages in Australia’s tech sector. Today's Headlines: - Second day of jobs summit gets started - French president to visit Australia - Changes to Covid guidelines - Malcolm Turnbull confronted by university students - Serena Williams’ grand farewell at the US is not over yet Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

Where the big money is

Could your next job be in tech? Job shortages are hitting the Australian economy hard, mostly in lower-skilled lower-paid jobs. One sector is bucking the trend; the tech sector is growing, with the number of jobs set to triple while salaries are growing strongly. We talk to Australia Tech Council deputy CEO Tom McMahon to get to the bottom of why Australia is so bad at tech. Dude, where’s my tech job?  Addressing chronic shortages in Australia’s tech sector. Today's Headlines: - Second day of jobs summit gets started - French president to visit Australia - Changes to Covid guidelines - Malcolm Turnbull confronted by university students - Serena Williams’ grand farewell at the US is not over yet Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

22:22

EP205 - S3

1 Sep 22

The Chris Dawson guilty verdict explained

In one of the most anticipated courtroom verdicts in living memory, Chris Dawson was this week found guilty of murdering his wife Lynette more than 40 years ago. A packed court heard Dawson murdered his wife so he could pursue a relationship with the Dawsons’ teenage babysitter. We’re joined by Matthew Condon, a journalist with the Australian who worked alongside Hedley Thomas, the creator of the Teacher’s Pet podcast which sparked the renewed hunt for the truth behind Lynette Dawson’s disappearance. In this episode of The Briefing, the Chris Dawson murder verdict explained. Today's Headlines: - Covid isolation period reduced - New fire danger system rolled out - Cosmetic surgery recommendations handed down - Gorbachev to be laid to rest in Moscow Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

The Chris Dawson guilty verdict explained

In one of the most anticipated courtroom verdicts in living memory, Chris Dawson was this week found guilty of murdering his wife Lynette more than 40 years ago. A packed court heard Dawson murdered his wife so he could pursue a relationship with the Dawsons’ teenage babysitter. We’re joined by Matthew Condon, a journalist with the Australian who worked alongside Hedley Thomas, the creator of the Teacher’s Pet podcast which sparked the renewed hunt for the truth behind Lynette Dawson’s disappearance. In this episode of The Briefing, the Chris Dawson murder verdict explained. Today's Headlines: - Covid isolation period reduced - New fire danger system rolled out - Cosmetic surgery recommendations handed down - Gorbachev to be laid to rest in Moscow Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

15:28

EP204 - S3

31 Aug 22

Could the teal wave crash upcoming state elections

At May’s federal election, six so-called teal independents defeated six sitting Liberal MPs. Teal is a mix of green and blue - so voters saw the six candidates as having conservative views, while supporting a green, or climate active, political leaning.  Tom and Annika take a deep dive on the teals, as both NSW and Victoria head to the polls in the next six months. Will the teal wave crash the upcoming elections - and could we see a repeat of what happened in the federal poll which saw a reshaping of the federal parliament? In this episode of the Briefing, could we see a repeat of the teal wave from May’s federal election in upcoming state elections? Today's Headlines: - Chris Dawson found guilty - LIV Golf signs Cameron Smith - Omicron booster given green light - Most popular delivery dishes revealed Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

Could the teal wave crash upcoming state elections

At May’s federal election, six so-called teal independents defeated six sitting Liberal MPs. Teal is a mix of green and blue - so voters saw the six candidates as having conservative views, while supporting a green, or climate active, political leaning.  Tom and Annika take a deep dive on the teals, as both NSW and Victoria head to the polls in the next six months. Will the teal wave crash the upcoming elections - and could we see a repeat of what happened in the federal poll which saw a reshaping of the federal parliament? In this episode of the Briefing, could we see a repeat of the teal wave from May’s federal election in upcoming state elections? Today's Headlines: - Chris Dawson found guilty - LIV Golf signs Cameron Smith - Omicron booster given green light - Most popular delivery dishes revealed Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

20:44

EP203 - S3

30 Aug 22

What they found in the drugs: Canberra’s pill testing trial

Back on July 19th, Australia’s first fixed pill testing site opened in Canberra’s city centre. The pilot program is running two nights a week for six months. Pill testing was one of the recommendations made by a coronial inquest into festival deaths. The team behind this latest site, called Harm Reduction Australia, has run a couple of trials of pill testing before at the Groovin the Moo festivals in Canberra. We’re joined by Professor Malcolm McLeod, a chemist from the ANU and chemistry lead for CanTEST and Pill Testing Australia to find out how the testing went. In today’s Briefing, we find out what was in the drugs, and how people reacted when the drugs they bought were not what they thought they were. Today's Headlines: - NASA rocket delayed - CSIRO releases pandemic report - Albo doesn’t rule out high income tax cuts - Grace Tame says abuser still harassing her - Chris Dawson verdict to be handed down Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

What they found in the drugs: Canberra’s pill testing trial

Back on July 19th, Australia’s first fixed pill testing site opened in Canberra’s city centre. The pilot program is running two nights a week for six months. Pill testing was one of the recommendations made by a coronial inquest into festival deaths. The team behind this latest site, called Harm Reduction Australia, has run a couple of trials of pill testing before at the Groovin the Moo festivals in Canberra. We’re joined by Professor Malcolm McLeod, a chemist from the ANU and chemistry lead for CanTEST and Pill Testing Australia to find out how the testing went. In today’s Briefing, we find out what was in the drugs, and how people reacted when the drugs they bought were not what they thought they were. Today's Headlines: - NASA rocket delayed - CSIRO releases pandemic report - Albo doesn’t rule out high income tax cuts - Grace Tame says abuser still harassing her - Chris Dawson verdict to be handed down Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

19:40

EP202 - S3

29 Aug 22

As Instagram battles TikTok, BeReal attacks from the other side

Could BeReal overtake Instagram and Facebook? Data from Google trends, which ranks a search term’s popularity out of 100, shows social media platform BeReal shot from 38 to 92 points the same week “Make Instagram Instagram Again” started trending. We’re joined by Claire Reilly - an Aussie tech journo living in San Fran working for tech news site CNet to find out what Be Real is all about, and if it will eventually threaten the big guns, Facebook and Instagram. So how big a deal is BeReal, and could it be the next major social media platform? Today's Headlines: - Unions move to strike bargaining deal with small business - Big news for nurses and midwives in Victoria - Bali bomb mastermind says his involvement was a ‘mistake’ - Push to reduce Covid isolation rules Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

As Instagram battles TikTok, BeReal attacks from the other side

Could BeReal overtake Instagram and Facebook? Data from Google trends, which ranks a search term’s popularity out of 100, shows social media platform BeReal shot from 38 to 92 points the same week “Make Instagram Instagram Again” started trending. We’re joined by Claire Reilly - an Aussie tech journo living in San Fran working for tech news site CNet to find out what Be Real is all about, and if it will eventually threaten the big guns, Facebook and Instagram. So how big a deal is BeReal, and could it be the next major social media platform? Today's Headlines: - Unions move to strike bargaining deal with small business - Big news for nurses and midwives in Victoria - Bali bomb mastermind says his involvement was a ‘mistake’ - Push to reduce Covid isolation rules Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

21:53

EP201 - S3

28 Aug 22

Beyond The Binary with Nevo Zisin

Nevo Zisin is a queer author, speaker, performer, and activist. Their speaking and writing in the gender and LGBTQIA+ space has been affirming for so many queer kids and adults, and educative for friends, family and allies alike. Nevo’s books Finding Nevo and The Pronoun Lowdown are available at all good bookstores. In this conversation Jamila Rizvi and Nevo Zisin discuss queer activism, Nevo’s personal journey of self-discovery and the importance of a loving and supportive environment for all kids to thrive. CONTENT WARNING: Brief mention of suicide Help and support is always available. If you need to talk, please contact Lifeline by calling 13 11 14 orQ-Life 1800 184 527, an anonymous and free LGBTIQA+ support, 3pm-12am.  THE WEEKEND LIST: WATCH: The Handmaids Tale – SBS On Demand READ: The Crikey Read – Leaning Out by Kristine Ziwica WATCH: The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills – HAYU DO: Help fight famine by writing to your local MP - https://www.fightfamine.com.au/ Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

Beyond The Binary with Nevo Zisin

Nevo Zisin is a queer author, speaker, performer, and activist. Their speaking and writing in the gender and LGBTQIA+ space has been affirming for so many queer kids and adults, and educative for friends, family and allies alike. Nevo’s books Finding Nevo and The Pronoun Lowdown are available at all good bookstores. In this conversation Jamila Rizvi and Nevo Zisin discuss queer activism, Nevo’s personal journey of self-discovery and the importance of a loving and supportive environment for all kids to thrive. CONTENT WARNING: Brief mention of suicide Help and support is always available. If you need to talk, please contact Lifeline by calling 13 11 14 orQ-Life 1800 184 527, an anonymous and free LGBTIQA+ support, 3pm-12am.  THE WEEKEND LIST: WATCH: The Handmaids Tale – SBS On Demand READ: The Crikey Read – Leaning Out by Kristine Ziwica WATCH: The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills – HAYU DO: Help fight famine by writing to your local MP - https://www.fightfamine.com.au/ Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

32:08

EP200 - S3

26 Aug 22

An intimacy coordinator takes us behind the scenes

Actor Sean Bean, known for Game of Thrones and Lord of the Rings has been getting heat for saying intimacy coordinators reduce “the natural way lovers behave” into a “technical exercise.” Emma Thompson and Amanda Seyfried are among the high-profile actresses to come out against the comments—saying intimacy coordinators make sets safer and more comfortable.   We speak to Chloe Dallimore, an intimacy coordinator who’s worked with a bunch of stars like Sam Worthington, Toni Collette and Idris Elba. Chloe tells us what exactly it is they do, and how shooting a sex scene has changed over the last 20 years.  On today’s Briefing, an intimacy coordinator takes us behind the scenes. Today's Headlines: - Robodebt Royal Commission announced - Qantas flags price hikes - Results of first Canberra pill-testing in  - Djokovic won’t play US Open Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

An intimacy coordinator takes us behind the scenes

Actor Sean Bean, known for Game of Thrones and Lord of the Rings has been getting heat for saying intimacy coordinators reduce “the natural way lovers behave” into a “technical exercise.” Emma Thompson and Amanda Seyfried are among the high-profile actresses to come out against the comments—saying intimacy coordinators make sets safer and more comfortable.   We speak to Chloe Dallimore, an intimacy coordinator who’s worked with a bunch of stars like Sam Worthington, Toni Collette and Idris Elba. Chloe tells us what exactly it is they do, and how shooting a sex scene has changed over the last 20 years.  On today’s Briefing, an intimacy coordinator takes us behind the scenes. Today's Headlines: - Robodebt Royal Commission announced - Qantas flags price hikes - Results of first Canberra pill-testing in  - Djokovic won’t play US Open Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

22:11

EP199 - S3

25 Aug 22

Shockwaves: 20 years since the Bali Bombings

Shockwaves: The Bali Bombings is a narrative documentary series exploring the lives of people in Australia and Bali impacted by the 12 October 2002 Bali Bombings. Of the 202 people killed, 88 were Australian. It was our worst peacetime atrocity. We’re joined by Network Ten journalist Ali Donaldson who explains many of the survivors have incredibly uplifting stories to now tell. Shockwaves: The Bali Bombings podcast reveals the astounding journeys that tragic event has taken them on, both emotionally and physically. How they survived the unthinkable, and how the things they learned can and are still are helping to save lives today. Shockwaves: The Bali Bombings launches today and is available on LiSTNR and all other podcast platforms. Listen to Shockwaves: The Bali Bombings Today's Headlines: - Unions want new enterprise bargaining agreements - Biden wipes thousands in student debt - Ukraine: more support floods in on Independence day - Finnish PM apologises for raunchy photos Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

Shockwaves: 20 years since the Bali Bombings

Shockwaves: The Bali Bombings is a narrative documentary series exploring the lives of people in Australia and Bali impacted by the 12 October 2002 Bali Bombings. Of the 202 people killed, 88 were Australian. It was our worst peacetime atrocity. We’re joined by Network Ten journalist Ali Donaldson who explains many of the survivors have incredibly uplifting stories to now tell. Shockwaves: The Bali Bombings podcast reveals the astounding journeys that tragic event has taken them on, both emotionally and physically. How they survived the unthinkable, and how the things they learned can and are still are helping to save lives today. Shockwaves: The Bali Bombings launches today and is available on LiSTNR and all other podcast platforms. Listen to Shockwaves: The Bali Bombings Today's Headlines: - Unions want new enterprise bargaining agreements - Biden wipes thousands in student debt - Ukraine: more support floods in on Independence day - Finnish PM apologises for raunchy photos Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

20:49

EP198 - S3

24 Aug 22

Why homosexuality is dividing the Anglican Church

There’s been a major split in Australia’s Anglican Church; conservatives who oppose same-sex marriage have launched a breakaway movement led by former Sydney Archbishop Glenn Davies. They aim to lure Anglicans who are unhappy with progressive bishops. Small, localised breakaway churches aren’t new, but there’s never been any with this sort of scope or involving such senior members of the established church before. We’re joined by Dr Renae Barker, an active member of the Anglican Church and a lecturer on law and religion at the University of Western Australia. In today’s Briefing, we discuss why homosexuality continues to divide Christians. Today's Headlines: - Scomo’s secret appointments were valid - John Farnham in ICU - Kyrgios faces two lawsuits - Andrew Tate deplatformed Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

Why homosexuality is dividing the Anglican Church

There’s been a major split in Australia’s Anglican Church; conservatives who oppose same-sex marriage have launched a breakaway movement led by former Sydney Archbishop Glenn Davies. They aim to lure Anglicans who are unhappy with progressive bishops. Small, localised breakaway churches aren’t new, but there’s never been any with this sort of scope or involving such senior members of the established church before. We’re joined by Dr Renae Barker, an active member of the Anglican Church and a lecturer on law and religion at the University of Western Australia. In today’s Briefing, we discuss why homosexuality continues to divide Christians. Today's Headlines: - Scomo’s secret appointments were valid - John Farnham in ICU - Kyrgios faces two lawsuits - Andrew Tate deplatformed Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

22:16

EP197 - S3

23 Aug 22

Why women are ditching the pill

The oral contraceptive pill was an absolute game changer for Australian women when it was introduced back in 1961. Why then, are oral contraceptives on their way out. We’re joined by Kelsey Menzies, a 25-year-old who went off the pill and is now on the rhythm method; and Professor Jayashri Kulkarni from Monash University who’s been leading research in this area. In the last 30 years, people using oral contraceptive pills have been declining. It’s as more awareness grows around the adverse impact of the pill on mental health. We look into this trend, and why researchers are worried about Tik Tok influencing contraceptive decisions. Today's Headlines: - PM to release legal advice into Scomo’s secret portfolios - Rise in welfare compared to pre-pandemic levels - Major drug bust of opioid fentanyl - US disease expert Anthony Fauci steps down - Satirical musical about Prince Andrew announced Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

Why women are ditching the pill

The oral contraceptive pill was an absolute game changer for Australian women when it was introduced back in 1961. Why then, are oral contraceptives on their way out. We’re joined by Kelsey Menzies, a 25-year-old who went off the pill and is now on the rhythm method; and Professor Jayashri Kulkarni from Monash University who’s been leading research in this area. In the last 30 years, people using oral contraceptive pills have been declining. It’s as more awareness grows around the adverse impact of the pill on mental health. We look into this trend, and why researchers are worried about Tik Tok influencing contraceptive decisions. Today's Headlines: - PM to release legal advice into Scomo’s secret portfolios - Rise in welfare compared to pre-pandemic levels - Major drug bust of opioid fentanyl - US disease expert Anthony Fauci steps down - Satirical musical about Prince Andrew announced Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

20:45

EP196 - S3

22 Aug 22

The Salman Rushdie stabbing: why he was targeted

Salman Rushdie has been stabbed at a New York lecture and could lose sight in one eye. The motivation behind the attack may be more than 30 years old. In 1989 the Iranian spiritual leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini condemned Rushdie to death via Fatwah due to the ‘blasphemous’ nature of his book: The Satanic Verses.   We’re joined by Vijay Mishra, Emeritus Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Murdoch University in Perth to look into why Rushdie is so controversial among those of the Muslim faith.  What was it about the Satanic Verses that made it so controversial, and why has Salman Rushdie been under a Fatwah since 1989? Today's Headlines: - Legal advice on Scomo’s secret appointments issued - Australia’s skills crisis - Putin advisor’s daughter killed in car bomb - Union calls Qantas ‘apology’ a stunt - Singapore legalises gay sex Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

The Salman Rushdie stabbing: why he was targeted

Salman Rushdie has been stabbed at a New York lecture and could lose sight in one eye. The motivation behind the attack may be more than 30 years old. In 1989 the Iranian spiritual leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini condemned Rushdie to death via Fatwah due to the ‘blasphemous’ nature of his book: The Satanic Verses.   We’re joined by Vijay Mishra, Emeritus Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Murdoch University in Perth to look into why Rushdie is so controversial among those of the Muslim faith.  What was it about the Satanic Verses that made it so controversial, and why has Salman Rushdie been under a Fatwah since 1989? Today's Headlines: - Legal advice on Scomo’s secret appointments issued - Australia’s skills crisis - Putin advisor’s daughter killed in car bomb - Union calls Qantas ‘apology’ a stunt - Singapore legalises gay sex Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

21:15

EP195 - S3

21 Aug 22

Ezi Magbegor is taking the world by storm

This year’s FIBA Women’s Basketball World Cup is only a month away and Ezi Magbegor is more than ready. A self-described ‘quiet person’ Ezi says she has tried to stay grounded during her meteoric rise in the sport. A remarkable feat given that she’s currently playing in the WNBA and was part of the Seattle Storm’s championship winning team in her rookie season. In this conversation Jamila Rizvi and Ezi Magbegor talk all things basketball, keeping a level head and dealing with pressure at an elite level.

Ezi Magbegor is taking the world by storm

This year’s FIBA Women’s Basketball World Cup is only a month away and Ezi Magbegor is more than ready. A self-described ‘quiet person’ Ezi says she has tried to stay grounded during her meteoric rise in the sport. A remarkable feat given that she’s currently playing in the WNBA and was part of the Seattle Storm’s championship winning team in her rookie season. In this conversation Jamila Rizvi and Ezi Magbegor talk all things basketball, keeping a level head and dealing with pressure at an elite level.

24:32

EP194 - S3

19 Aug 22

Will a Native American technique help save Australian Indigenous languages?

Native Americans have been teaching Indigenous Australians how to strengthen their languages at a conference in Alice Springs. The Master-Apprentice method was developed by small Indigenous language communities in California and has proven to be the most effective method for endangered language communities with few resources. We’re joined by Dr Richard Grounds - Executive Director of the Yuchi Language Project in Oklahoma who has been in Australia; and Leon Yeatman CEO of Batchelor Institute in the Northern Territory, who tells us about programs to save indigenous languages in Australia. With many Indigenous languages under threat in Australia, will this new approach help? Today's Headlines: - Bali bomb-maker to walk free early - Unemployment rate falls to record low - Scomo apologises to former Home Affairs minister - Covid cases drop 24% globally Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

Will a Native American technique help save Australian Indigenous languages?

Native Americans have been teaching Indigenous Australians how to strengthen their languages at a conference in Alice Springs. The Master-Apprentice method was developed by small Indigenous language communities in California and has proven to be the most effective method for endangered language communities with few resources. We’re joined by Dr Richard Grounds - Executive Director of the Yuchi Language Project in Oklahoma who has been in Australia; and Leon Yeatman CEO of Batchelor Institute in the Northern Territory, who tells us about programs to save indigenous languages in Australia. With many Indigenous languages under threat in Australia, will this new approach help? Today's Headlines: - Bali bomb-maker to walk free early - Unemployment rate falls to record low - Scomo apologises to former Home Affairs minister - Covid cases drop 24% globally Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

19:48

EP193 - S3

18 Aug 22

The man who exposed Scott Morrison’s secret portfolios

The nation has been stunned by revelations in Simon Benson’s new book Plagued, where we learned former Prime Minister Scott Morrison assigned ministerial portfolios to himself. His colleagues in the parliament had no idea. It’s seriously damaged Morrison’s legacy, just months after the May election. Simon, who covers politics for Sydney’s Daily Telegraph, takes us behind the scenes as he compiled the book that has rocked Australia’s political landscape. In this episode of The Briefing, a deep dive on Scott Morrison’s chaotic prime ministership. Today's Headlines: - Scott Morrison refuses to resign - Plan to cut emissions by biggest polluters released - Senior Republican loses seat over not supporting Trump - Japanese government wants young people to drink again Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

The man who exposed Scott Morrison’s secret portfolios

The nation has been stunned by revelations in Simon Benson’s new book Plagued, where we learned former Prime Minister Scott Morrison assigned ministerial portfolios to himself. His colleagues in the parliament had no idea. It’s seriously damaged Morrison’s legacy, just months after the May election. Simon, who covers politics for Sydney’s Daily Telegraph, takes us behind the scenes as he compiled the book that has rocked Australia’s political landscape. In this episode of The Briefing, a deep dive on Scott Morrison’s chaotic prime ministership. Today's Headlines: - Scott Morrison refuses to resign - Plan to cut emissions by biggest polluters released - Senior Republican loses seat over not supporting Trump - Japanese government wants young people to drink again Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

19:04

EP192 - S3

17 Aug 22

Stop It At The Start: talking to your children about domestic violence

Not all disrespect towards women ends in violence, but all violence against women starts with disrespectful behaviour.  We want to set good examples for the young people we influence in our lives.   Stop It At The Start has practical resources so together, we can work to stop violence against women.   Tom is joined by TV and radio host and journalist Carrie Bickmore and together they interview Patty Kinnersly, CEO of Our Watch to talk about how best to have these conversations, because it’s not just one big conversation, it’s many little ones. In this special episode of The Briefing, Tom and Carrie discuss the campaign from a parents’ point of view – the link between our endemic violence against women and attitudes of disrespect and gender which start as children.  Every little talk you have shapes them. When you bring up respect, respect grows.    For conversation starters, tools, and resources, visit respect.gov.au Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

Stop It At The Start: talking to your children about domestic violence

Not all disrespect towards women ends in violence, but all violence against women starts with disrespectful behaviour.  We want to set good examples for the young people we influence in our lives.   Stop It At The Start has practical resources so together, we can work to stop violence against women.   Tom is joined by TV and radio host and journalist Carrie Bickmore and together they interview Patty Kinnersly, CEO of Our Watch to talk about how best to have these conversations, because it’s not just one big conversation, it’s many little ones. In this special episode of The Briefing, Tom and Carrie discuss the campaign from a parents’ point of view – the link between our endemic violence against women and attitudes of disrespect and gender which start as children.  Every little talk you have shapes them. When you bring up respect, respect grows.    For conversation starters, tools, and resources, visit respect.gov.au Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

12:05

EP191 - S3

16 Aug 22

Australia’s leading investigative journalist Nick McKenzie on neo-Nazis in Australia

We’re joined by leading investigative journalist Nick McKenzie to take a deep dive into Australia's neo-Nazi movement. McKenzie has gained footage from inside secret meetings, bush camps, gym sessions and even uncovered the way they use encrypted messaging apps like Telegram to organise their movement and share their racism.  In this briefing Nick McKenzie shares what he’s learnt about this movement and the threat it poses. Today's Headlines: - Scomo resisting calls to quit - Indigenous ministers meet to talk referendum - NSW flood report issues 28 recommendations - Anglican church split underway - Plan to bring Tasmanian tiger back to life Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

Australia’s leading investigative journalist Nick McKenzie on neo-Nazis in Australia

We’re joined by leading investigative journalist Nick McKenzie to take a deep dive into Australia's neo-Nazi movement. McKenzie has gained footage from inside secret meetings, bush camps, gym sessions and even uncovered the way they use encrypted messaging apps like Telegram to organise their movement and share their racism.  In this briefing Nick McKenzie shares what he’s learnt about this movement and the threat it poses. Today's Headlines: - Scomo resisting calls to quit - Indigenous ministers meet to talk referendum - NSW flood report issues 28 recommendations - Anglican church split underway - Plan to bring Tasmanian tiger back to life Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

22:09

EP190 - S3

16 Aug 22

Misdiagnosis: when your doctor is not listening

It’s estimated 140,000 people have medical issues misdiagnosed in Australia every year, and as many as 4000 end in death. We’re joined by Mary Dahm from the ANU’s Institute for Communication in Healthcare, and Jen M, a person who has been misdiagnosed. A new study has looked into how and why misdiagnosis happen; we speak with the researchers to find out what to do if you suspect you’re being misdiagnosed or not being listened to by your medical practitioner. Today's Headlines: - Turnbull says Scomo revelations ‘appalling’ - New Omicron vaccine approved by UK - Assange suing CIA over spying claims - Australian rentals below WHO safety rating Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

Misdiagnosis: when your doctor is not listening

It’s estimated 140,000 people have medical issues misdiagnosed in Australia every year, and as many as 4000 end in death. We’re joined by Mary Dahm from the ANU’s Institute for Communication in Healthcare, and Jen M, a person who has been misdiagnosed. A new study has looked into how and why misdiagnosis happen; we speak with the researchers to find out what to do if you suspect you’re being misdiagnosed or not being listened to by your medical practitioner. Today's Headlines: - Turnbull says Scomo revelations ‘appalling’ - New Omicron vaccine approved by UK - Assange suing CIA over spying claims - Australian rentals below WHO safety rating Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

21:10

EP189 - S3

15 Aug 22

Infowars' Alex Jones demolished by Sandy Hook mother

US conspiracy theorist Alex Jones has been ordered to pay $A70 million in damages after falsely claiming the 2012 Sandy Hook school shooting was a hoax.  Jones – host of Infowars, and a renowned conspiracy theorist - has repeatedly argued that the shooting was a hoax orchestrated by the government to strip Americans of gun rights, and that the parents of the dead children were "crisis actors."  We’re joined by Elizabeth Williamson - New York Times journalist and author of Sandy Hook: An American Tragedy and the Battle for Truth” who explains how and why Jones spread these awful untruths, and what this court decision means for his future.  Can Alex Jones and Infowars survive this brutal demolition by the parents of a Sandy Hook victim?  Today's Headlines: - Organised crime has infiltrated NDIS - Scomo secretly sworn in as Resources Minister - Flights return to normal in Canberra - Salman Rushdie on road to recovery - Five members of US Congress visit Taiwan Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

Infowars' Alex Jones demolished by Sandy Hook mother

US conspiracy theorist Alex Jones has been ordered to pay $A70 million in damages after falsely claiming the 2012 Sandy Hook school shooting was a hoax.  Jones – host of Infowars, and a renowned conspiracy theorist - has repeatedly argued that the shooting was a hoax orchestrated by the government to strip Americans of gun rights, and that the parents of the dead children were "crisis actors."  We’re joined by Elizabeth Williamson - New York Times journalist and author of Sandy Hook: An American Tragedy and the Battle for Truth” who explains how and why Jones spread these awful untruths, and what this court decision means for his future.  Can Alex Jones and Infowars survive this brutal demolition by the parents of a Sandy Hook victim?  Today's Headlines: - Organised crime has infiltrated NDIS - Scomo secretly sworn in as Resources Minister - Flights return to normal in Canberra - Salman Rushdie on road to recovery - Five members of US Congress visit Taiwan Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast  Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAU Twitter: @TheBriefingAU 

22:11

EP188 - S3

14 Aug 22


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