Come Out Wherever You Are with Sean Szeps
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    Come Out Wherever You Are with Sean Szeps

Come Out Wherever You Are with Sean Szeps

Come Out, Wherever You Are is a podcast about the coming out experience, told by the people who’ve done it. Host Sean Szeps is a proud member of the LGBTQIA+ community. In each episode he speaks with guests across Australia’s gender and

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Season 1


Josh Szeps is married to a man…but he’s not gay

Does everyone need to give their sexuality a label?  Josh Szeps is a journalist and broadcaster who has been coming out regularly from the early 2000s to, well, yesterday. Josh had been in relationships with men and women prior to meeting and marrying Sean. Although they're married, Josh doesn't call himself gay. In fact, he doesn't call himself anything.  In this episode Josh and Sean discuss why Josh avoids labelling his sexuality, coming out to each other throughout the course of their relationship and why Josh has to come out more than Sean. If this episode brought up any feelings for you or you want more information, these resources may help you: QLife: Call 1800 184 527 for a free phone service every day from 3pm – midnight. Visit their website www.qlife.org.au for a free webchat Minus18: Australia’s LGBTQIA+ charity. Follow them on social @minus18youth or visit their website on www.minus18.org.au for resources, events and training for your school or workplace Lifeline: Call 13 11 14 for 24-hour crisis support If you want to be a part of the Come Out Wherever You Are community, you can follow us on Instagram: @comeoutwhereveryouare @seanszeps @joshszeps Or email us at [email protected]

Josh Szeps is married to a man…but he’s not gay

Does everyone need to give their sexuality a label?  Josh Szeps is a journalist and broadcaster who has been coming out regularly from the early 2000s to, well, yesterday. Josh had been in relationships with men and women prior to meeting and marrying Sean. Although they're married, Josh doesn't call himself gay. In fact, he doesn't call himself anything.  In this episode Josh and Sean discuss why Josh avoids labelling his sexuality, coming out to each other throughout the course of their relationship and why Josh has to come out more than Sean. If this episode brought up any feelings for you or you want more information, these resources may help you: QLife: Call 1800 184 527 for a free phone service every day from 3pm – midnight. Visit their website www.qlife.org.au for a free webchat Minus18: Australia’s LGBTQIA+ charity. Follow them on social @minus18youth or visit their website on www.minus18.org.au for resources, events and training for your school or workplace Lifeline: Call 13 11 14 for 24-hour crisis support If you want to be a part of the Come Out Wherever You Are community, you can follow us on Instagram: @comeoutwhereveryouare @seanszeps @joshszeps Or email us at [email protected]

52:18

EP08 - S1

22 Sep 21

“What is asexuality?” with David Jay

How do you have relationships if you're not interested in having sex with your partner? David Jay is an asexual advocate and founder of the Asexual Visibility & Education Network (AVEN) who last came out to a colleague. Growing up, David watched his friends develop crushes and get into relationships and he waited for the desire to do the same. When these feelings never materialised, David began to imagine what his life would look like if he lived openly as an asexual person. He founded the Asexual Visibility & Education Network in the early days of the internet to find other people like him and since then AVEN has grown into the world's largest asexual community.  In this episode David shares what it meant to describe himself as asexual before proper descriptions of asexuality existed, untangling other people's ideas around relationships and intimacy and how he's raising his daughter alongside two co-parents. If this episode brought up any feelings for you or you want more information, these resources may help you: QLife: Call 1800 184 527 for a free phone service every day from 3pm – midnight. Visit their website www.qlife.org.au for a free webchat Minus18: Australia’s LGBTQIA+ charity. Follow them on social @minus18youth or visit their website on www.minus18.org.au for resources, events and training for your school or workplace Lifeline: Call 13 11 14 for 24-hour crisis support What does it mean to be asexual? Find out more here https://www.minus18.org.au/articles/what-does-it-mean-to-be-asexual https://www.asexuality.org/  If you want to be a part of the Come Out Wherever You Are community, you can follow us on Instagram: @comeoutwhereveryouare @seanszeps @davidgljay

“What is asexuality?” with David Jay

How do you have relationships if you're not interested in having sex with your partner? David Jay is an asexual advocate and founder of the Asexual Visibility & Education Network (AVEN) who last came out to a colleague. Growing up, David watched his friends develop crushes and get into relationships and he waited for the desire to do the same. When these feelings never materialised, David began to imagine what his life would look like if he lived openly as an asexual person. He founded the Asexual Visibility & Education Network in the early days of the internet to find other people like him and since then AVEN has grown into the world's largest asexual community.  In this episode David shares what it meant to describe himself as asexual before proper descriptions of asexuality existed, untangling other people's ideas around relationships and intimacy and how he's raising his daughter alongside two co-parents. If this episode brought up any feelings for you or you want more information, these resources may help you: QLife: Call 1800 184 527 for a free phone service every day from 3pm – midnight. Visit their website www.qlife.org.au for a free webchat Minus18: Australia’s LGBTQIA+ charity. Follow them on social @minus18youth or visit their website on www.minus18.org.au for resources, events and training for your school or workplace Lifeline: Call 13 11 14 for 24-hour crisis support What does it mean to be asexual? Find out more here https://www.minus18.org.au/articles/what-does-it-mean-to-be-asexual https://www.asexuality.org/  If you want to be a part of the Come Out Wherever You Are community, you can follow us on Instagram: @comeoutwhereveryouare @seanszeps @davidgljay

01:02:40

EP07 - S1

7 Sep 21

Grace Hyland was born in the wrong body

What do you if your gender doesn't match the body you were born into? Grace Hyland is a content creator who last came out on TikTok when she posted a photo of herself as a kid before she'd started transitioning.  Grace was 4 years old when she realised she was born into the wrong body. She discovered a world of trans content creators on YouTube who helped her come to terms with her identity before she came out and began transitioning in her early teens. Now Grace is creating a space online where other young trans people (and their allies) can learn more about her story and educate themselves on the reality of being transgender. In this episode Grace shares with Sean about coming out to her family as a teenager, how she feels when people ask her questions about medically transitioning and finding (and creating) a community online. If this episode brought up any feelings for you or you want more information, these resources may help you: QLife: Call 1800 184 527 for a free phone service every day from 3pm – midnight. Visit their website www.qlife.org.au for a free webchat Minus18: Australia’s LGBTQIA+ charity. Follow them on social @minus18youth or visit their website on www.minus18.org.au for resources, events and training for your school or workplace Lifeline: Call 13 11 14 for 24-hour crisis support Wanna learn more about supporting a trans person in your life? Check out Minus 18's Trans Awareness Week resources: https://www.minus18.org.au/articles/trans-awareness-week-digital-resources If you want to be a part of the Come Out Wherever You Are community, you can follow us on Instagram: @comeoutwhereveryouare @seanszeps @grace.hylandd

Grace Hyland was born in the wrong body

What do you if your gender doesn't match the body you were born into? Grace Hyland is a content creator who last came out on TikTok when she posted a photo of herself as a kid before she'd started transitioning.  Grace was 4 years old when she realised she was born into the wrong body. She discovered a world of trans content creators on YouTube who helped her come to terms with her identity before she came out and began transitioning in her early teens. Now Grace is creating a space online where other young trans people (and their allies) can learn more about her story and educate themselves on the reality of being transgender. In this episode Grace shares with Sean about coming out to her family as a teenager, how she feels when people ask her questions about medically transitioning and finding (and creating) a community online. If this episode brought up any feelings for you or you want more information, these resources may help you: QLife: Call 1800 184 527 for a free phone service every day from 3pm – midnight. Visit their website www.qlife.org.au for a free webchat Minus18: Australia’s LGBTQIA+ charity. Follow them on social @minus18youth or visit their website on www.minus18.org.au for resources, events and training for your school or workplace Lifeline: Call 13 11 14 for 24-hour crisis support Wanna learn more about supporting a trans person in your life? Check out Minus 18's Trans Awareness Week resources: https://www.minus18.org.au/articles/trans-awareness-week-digital-resources If you want to be a part of the Come Out Wherever You Are community, you can follow us on Instagram: @comeoutwhereveryouare @seanszeps @grace.hylandd

01:01:36

EP06 - S1

24 Aug 21

Patricia Karvelas reported on marriage equality as a queer woman

What do you do when you report the news and your rights are being debated in the news? Patricia Karvelas is one of Australia's most well known journalists who last came out to a sales assistant who incorrectly assumed she was shopping for her husband. When Patricia started coming out as a young person, people told her she'd be in for a "hard life". But as she's grown up, Patricia has seen Australian society change to become a place where her family is surrounded by a supportive and accepting community, she is comfortable being her full self at work and where marriage equality is legal. In this episode Patricia shares with Sean about dabbling as a butch lesbian (before realising she could be herself and still be a lesbian), coming out around her kids and navigating the 2017 marriage equality postal vote both as a journalist and a queer woman. If this episode brought up any feelings for you or you want more information, these resources may help you: QLife: Call 1800 184 527 for a free phone service every day from 3pm – midnight. Visit their website www.qlife.org.au for a free webchat Minus18: Australia’s LGBTQIA+ charity. Follow them on social @minus18youth or visit their website on www.minus18.org.au for resources, events and training for your school or workplace Lifeline: Call 13 11 14 for 24-hour crisis support If you want to be a part of the Come Out Wherever You Are community, you can follow us on Instagram: @comeoutwhereveryouare @seanszeps @patskarvelas

Patricia Karvelas reported on marriage equality as a queer woman

What do you do when you report the news and your rights are being debated in the news? Patricia Karvelas is one of Australia's most well known journalists who last came out to a sales assistant who incorrectly assumed she was shopping for her husband. When Patricia started coming out as a young person, people told her she'd be in for a "hard life". But as she's grown up, Patricia has seen Australian society change to become a place where her family is surrounded by a supportive and accepting community, she is comfortable being her full self at work and where marriage equality is legal. In this episode Patricia shares with Sean about dabbling as a butch lesbian (before realising she could be herself and still be a lesbian), coming out around her kids and navigating the 2017 marriage equality postal vote both as a journalist and a queer woman. If this episode brought up any feelings for you or you want more information, these resources may help you: QLife: Call 1800 184 527 for a free phone service every day from 3pm – midnight. Visit their website www.qlife.org.au for a free webchat Minus18: Australia’s LGBTQIA+ charity. Follow them on social @minus18youth or visit their website on www.minus18.org.au for resources, events and training for your school or workplace Lifeline: Call 13 11 14 for 24-hour crisis support If you want to be a part of the Come Out Wherever You Are community, you can follow us on Instagram: @comeoutwhereveryouare @seanszeps @patskarvelas

52:48

EP05 - S1

10 Aug 21

Jacob Stanley grew up wishing he wasn’t gay

Are all coming out stories... bad? Not this one. Jacob Stanley is the co-host of Australia's number one entertainment podcast Just The Gist.  Growing up, everyone in Jacob's life told him he was gay, so it didn't surprise anyone when he began coming out during high school and in his early 20's. But despite coming out to overwhelming support from his family and friends, Jacob still spent his younger years wishing he wasn't the thing he knew himself to be. In this episode Jacob shares with Sean about suppressing his identity as a kid, the culture shock of moving from the Central Coast of NSW to Sydney, one of the world's most LGBTQIA+ friendly cities, and coming out (and not coming out) at work. If this episode brought up any feelings for you or you want more information, these resources may help you: QLife: Call 1800 184 527 for a free phone service every day from 3pm – midnight. Visit their website www.qlife.org.au for a free webchat Minus18: Australia’s LGBTQIA+ charity. Follow them on social @minus18youth or visit their website on www.minus18.org.au for resources, events and training for your school or workplace Lifeline: Call 13 11 14 for 24-hour crisis support If you want to be a part of the Come Out Wherever You Are community, you can follow us on Instagram: @comeoutwhereveryouare @seanszeps @jacobwilliamstanley Listen to Jacob co-host the weekly-ish podcast Just The Gist: https://www.listnr.com/podcasts/podcasts/just-the-gist

Jacob Stanley grew up wishing he wasn’t gay

Are all coming out stories... bad? Not this one. Jacob Stanley is the co-host of Australia's number one entertainment podcast Just The Gist.  Growing up, everyone in Jacob's life told him he was gay, so it didn't surprise anyone when he began coming out during high school and in his early 20's. But despite coming out to overwhelming support from his family and friends, Jacob still spent his younger years wishing he wasn't the thing he knew himself to be. In this episode Jacob shares with Sean about suppressing his identity as a kid, the culture shock of moving from the Central Coast of NSW to Sydney, one of the world's most LGBTQIA+ friendly cities, and coming out (and not coming out) at work. If this episode brought up any feelings for you or you want more information, these resources may help you: QLife: Call 1800 184 527 for a free phone service every day from 3pm – midnight. Visit their website www.qlife.org.au for a free webchat Minus18: Australia’s LGBTQIA+ charity. Follow them on social @minus18youth or visit their website on www.minus18.org.au for resources, events and training for your school or workplace Lifeline: Call 13 11 14 for 24-hour crisis support If you want to be a part of the Come Out Wherever You Are community, you can follow us on Instagram: @comeoutwhereveryouare @seanszeps @jacobwilliamstanley Listen to Jacob co-host the weekly-ish podcast Just The Gist: https://www.listnr.com/podcasts/podcasts/just-the-gist

45:58

EP04 - S1

27 Jul 21

Kirra Hampson came out as pansexual at 14 years old

How is it possible that a 14-year-old can understand and then publicly announce - to an entire school assembly - that they are pansexual? Actually, let's back up... what's pansexuality? Kirra Hampson is a content creator who last came out during an online film course. As a young person on the internet in the mid 2000's, Kirra spent a lot of time on Tumblr. It was here she discovered the word 'pansexual' and found a name for feelings she wasn't able to articulate. Six months later, she came out to her entire school at an assembly. In this episode Kirra opens up to Sean about finding support online before coming out in real life, dealing with bullying that followed her around the regional city of Dubbo and becoming an accidental advocate for LGBTQIA+ students at school. If this episode brought up any feelings for you or you want more information, these resources may help you: QLife: Call 1800 184 527 for a free phone service every day from 3pm – midnight. Visit their website www.qlife.org.au for a free webchat Minus18: Australia’s LGBTQIA+ charity. Follow them on social @minus18youth or visit their website on www.minus18.org.au for resources, events and training for your school or workplace Lifeline: Call 13 11 14 for 24-hour crisis support What's the difference between bisexual and pansexual? https://www.minus18.org.au/articles/what's-the-difference-between-bisexual-and-pansexual If you want to be a part of the Come Out Wherever You Are community, you can follow us on Instagram: @comeoutwhereveryouare @seanszeps @kirrasdeliveryservice on TikTok

Kirra Hampson came out as pansexual at 14 years old

How is it possible that a 14-year-old can understand and then publicly announce - to an entire school assembly - that they are pansexual? Actually, let's back up... what's pansexuality? Kirra Hampson is a content creator who last came out during an online film course. As a young person on the internet in the mid 2000's, Kirra spent a lot of time on Tumblr. It was here she discovered the word 'pansexual' and found a name for feelings she wasn't able to articulate. Six months later, she came out to her entire school at an assembly. In this episode Kirra opens up to Sean about finding support online before coming out in real life, dealing with bullying that followed her around the regional city of Dubbo and becoming an accidental advocate for LGBTQIA+ students at school. If this episode brought up any feelings for you or you want more information, these resources may help you: QLife: Call 1800 184 527 for a free phone service every day from 3pm – midnight. Visit their website www.qlife.org.au for a free webchat Minus18: Australia’s LGBTQIA+ charity. Follow them on social @minus18youth or visit their website on www.minus18.org.au for resources, events and training for your school or workplace Lifeline: Call 13 11 14 for 24-hour crisis support What's the difference between bisexual and pansexual? https://www.minus18.org.au/articles/what's-the-difference-between-bisexual-and-pansexual If you want to be a part of the Come Out Wherever You Are community, you can follow us on Instagram: @comeoutwhereveryouare @seanszeps @kirrasdeliveryservice on TikTok

50:36

EP03 - S1

13 Jul 21

Sophie Cachia is “sexually bisexual but emotionally gay”

What would you do if your wife and mother to your children told you she liked women?  Sophie Cachia is a businesswoman who last came out to a sales assistant while buying underwear for her (female) partner. Growing up Sophie was never the girl who kissed other girls at parties for fun. Until a few years ago she was happily married to man, until a surprise attraction to another woman lead her to discover a new side to herself that she didn't know existed. These days Sophie describes herself as sexually bisexual and emotionally gay. In this episode Sophie opens up to Sean about coming out while married and in the public eye, finding her people in the LGBTQIA+ community (and leaving behind those who don't support her) and how she's raising her kids to be open-minded of all people, regardless of their gender or sexuality. If this episode brought up any feelings for you or you want more information, these resources may help you: QLife: Call 1800 184 527 for a free phone service every day from 3pm – midnight. Visit their website www.qlife.org.au for a free webchat Minus18: Australia’s LGBTQIA+ charity. Follow them on social @minus18youth or visit their website on www.minus18.org.au for resources, events and training for your school or workplace Lifeline: Call 13 11 14 for 24-hour crisis support If you want to be a part of the Come Out Wherever You Are community, you can follow us on Instagram: @comeoutwhereveryouare @seanszeps @sophiecachia_

Sophie Cachia is “sexually bisexual but emotionally gay”

What would you do if your wife and mother to your children told you she liked women?  Sophie Cachia is a businesswoman who last came out to a sales assistant while buying underwear for her (female) partner. Growing up Sophie was never the girl who kissed other girls at parties for fun. Until a few years ago she was happily married to man, until a surprise attraction to another woman lead her to discover a new side to herself that she didn't know existed. These days Sophie describes herself as sexually bisexual and emotionally gay. In this episode Sophie opens up to Sean about coming out while married and in the public eye, finding her people in the LGBTQIA+ community (and leaving behind those who don't support her) and how she's raising her kids to be open-minded of all people, regardless of their gender or sexuality. If this episode brought up any feelings for you or you want more information, these resources may help you: QLife: Call 1800 184 527 for a free phone service every day from 3pm – midnight. Visit their website www.qlife.org.au for a free webchat Minus18: Australia’s LGBTQIA+ charity. Follow them on social @minus18youth or visit their website on www.minus18.org.au for resources, events and training for your school or workplace Lifeline: Call 13 11 14 for 24-hour crisis support If you want to be a part of the Come Out Wherever You Are community, you can follow us on Instagram: @comeoutwhereveryouare @seanszeps @sophiecachia_

55:15

EP02 - S1

29 Jun 21

Deni Todorovič came out as non-binary to religious parents

How would a religious parent respond to their child coming out as gay? And then coming out again as non-binary later in life?  Deni Todorovič is an activist and a content creator who comes out as queer and non-binary most days. Deni has known they were gay since early childhood when they would kiss a poster of ‘90210’ star Brian Austin Green alone in their bedroom. But growing up in a religious, Serbian family in Geelong in the 90’s meant Deni didn’t know any gay people, so it wasn’t until their late teens when they finally came out to their family. Deni came out again as non-binary in 2020, after non-binary musician Sam Smith gave a name to feelings Deni had been experiencing since childhood. In this episode Deni opens up to host Sean Szeps about how culture and religion intersects with their gender and sexuality, suppressing their sexuality to try and fit in as a kid and deliberately standing out as a gay, non-binary adult. If this episode brought up any feelings for you or you want more information, these resources may help you: QLife: Call 1800 184 527 for a free phone service every day from 3pm – midnight. Visit their website www.qlife.org.au for a free webchat Minus18: Australia’s LGBTQIA+ charity. Follow them on social @minus18youth or visit their website on www.minus18.org.au for resources, events and training for your school or workplace Lifeline: Call 13 11 14 for 24-hour crisis support What does it mean to be non-binary? https://www.minus18.org.au/articles/i-just-came-out-as-non-binary-here's-what-that-means If you want to be a part of the Come Out Wherever You Are community, you can follow us on Instagram: @comeoutwhereveryouare @seanszeps @stylebydeni

Deni Todorovič came out as non-binary to religious parents

How would a religious parent respond to their child coming out as gay? And then coming out again as non-binary later in life?  Deni Todorovič is an activist and a content creator who comes out as queer and non-binary most days. Deni has known they were gay since early childhood when they would kiss a poster of ‘90210’ star Brian Austin Green alone in their bedroom. But growing up in a religious, Serbian family in Geelong in the 90’s meant Deni didn’t know any gay people, so it wasn’t until their late teens when they finally came out to their family. Deni came out again as non-binary in 2020, after non-binary musician Sam Smith gave a name to feelings Deni had been experiencing since childhood. In this episode Deni opens up to host Sean Szeps about how culture and religion intersects with their gender and sexuality, suppressing their sexuality to try and fit in as a kid and deliberately standing out as a gay, non-binary adult. If this episode brought up any feelings for you or you want more information, these resources may help you: QLife: Call 1800 184 527 for a free phone service every day from 3pm – midnight. Visit their website www.qlife.org.au for a free webchat Minus18: Australia’s LGBTQIA+ charity. Follow them on social @minus18youth or visit their website on www.minus18.org.au for resources, events and training for your school or workplace Lifeline: Call 13 11 14 for 24-hour crisis support What does it mean to be non-binary? https://www.minus18.org.au/articles/i-just-came-out-as-non-binary-here's-what-that-means If you want to be a part of the Come Out Wherever You Are community, you can follow us on Instagram: @comeoutwhereveryouare @seanszeps @stylebydeni

59:05

EP01 - S1

15 Jun 21

Come Out Wherever You Are with Sean Szeps - Trailer

Come Out, Wherever You Are is a podcast about the coming out experience, told by the people who’ve done it.  Host Sean Szeps is a proud member of the LGBTQIA+ community. In each episode he speaks with guests across Australia’s gender and sexual spectrum to learn about their unique experiences and understand what it’s like to come out for the first time (and every time after that).

Come Out Wherever You Are with Sean Szeps - Trailer

Come Out, Wherever You Are is a podcast about the coming out experience, told by the people who’ve done it.  Host Sean Szeps is a proud member of the LGBTQIA+ community. In each episode he speaks with guests across Australia’s gender and sexual spectrum to learn about their unique experiences and understand what it’s like to come out for the first time (and every time after that).

03:12

0

7 Jun 21

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