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Season 1


How Ben Liebmann, an Australian media guy, ended up COO at Noma, the world’s best restaurant – and now has streaming platforms coming back for seconds

You probably know Noma in Copenhagen is officially the world’s best restaurant. What you probably didn't know is that its Chief Operating Officer is an Australian called Ben Liebmann, the media guy who brought the acclaimed Noma pop up restaurant to Sydney's Barangaroo six years ago with Tourism Australia. You also probably wouldn't know that Liebmann was handpicked by Elizabeth Murdoch a decade ago to create Shine 360, the commercial arm of her production business, to run rights management, sponsorship, brand integration and consumer products. Shine's Master Chef ended up becoming a $700 million beast from sponsorship deals, consumer products such as pots and pans, book sales events and the rest. At Noma, Liebmann is working with the real master chef in Noma founder René Redzepi, who is eschewing the well-worn path of licensed restaurants or Gordon Ramsay style entertainment shows. Instead, they have built a different kind of media unit, with shows now being picked-up by a global streaming giant. And it may be that Liebmann is heading back to Australia permanently to expand the business. Suffice to say Mi3 listeners are in for a veritable feast of creativity, growth and a hunger for more.

How Ben Liebmann, an Australian media guy, ended up COO at Noma, the world’s best restaurant – and now has streaming platforms coming back for seconds

You probably know Noma in Copenhagen is officially the world’s best restaurant. What you probably didn't know is that its Chief Operating Officer is an Australian called Ben Liebmann, the media guy who brought the acclaimed Noma pop up restaurant to Sydney's Barangaroo six years ago with Tourism Australia. You also probably wouldn't know that Liebmann was handpicked by Elizabeth Murdoch a decade ago to create Shine 360, the commercial arm of her production business, to run rights management, sponsorship, brand integration and consumer products. Shine's Master Chef ended up becoming a $700 million beast from sponsorship deals, consumer products such as pots and pans, book sales events and the rest. At Noma, Liebmann is working with the real master chef in Noma founder René Redzepi, who is eschewing the well-worn path of licensed restaurants or Gordon Ramsay style entertainment shows. Instead, they have built a different kind of media unit, with shows now being picked-up by a global streaming giant. And it may be that Liebmann is heading back to Australia permanently to expand the business. Suffice to say Mi3 listeners are in for a veritable feast of creativity, growth and a hunger for more.

37:13

EP177 - S1

29 Nov 21

B2B’s great tension: Lead gen v brand building, why tech hardware firms and DocuSign are racing to brand and Zenith’s Nickie Scriven on lifting B2B cut-through, webinar overload

There’s been a dramatic shift in B2B marketing over the past 18 months. B2B marketers have slowly clocked on that they over-invested in performance marketing tactics and hadn’t seen the long-term growth they expected. For tech hardware firms, global supply chain issues have meant they’ve had no choice but to try brand – there’s little to sell. “We’re definitely seeing this swing away from your heavy focus on that lower funnel activity,” says LinkedIn’s Prue Cox. DocuSign, a cloud-based e-signature platform, is a case in point. It boomed through Covid and has just launched a brand campaign with influencers like Boost Juice’s Janine Allis and former Nine host Jules Lund. CMO Andrea Dixon says DocuSign had to pivot from B2B to “business to everyone” – virtually overnight. Meanwhile, Zenith Media CEO Nickie Scriven reckons there’s a real opportunity for B2B firms to lift their cut-through on lead gen. “I get at least 20 (emails) a day and I just delete every single one of them,” she says.

B2B’s great tension: Lead gen v brand building, why tech hardware firms and DocuSign are racing to brand and Zenith’s Nickie Scriven on lifting B2B cut-through, webinar overload

There’s been a dramatic shift in B2B marketing over the past 18 months. B2B marketers have slowly clocked on that they over-invested in performance marketing tactics and hadn’t seen the long-term growth they expected. For tech hardware firms, global supply chain issues have meant they’ve had no choice but to try brand – there’s little to sell. “We’re definitely seeing this swing away from your heavy focus on that lower funnel activity,” says LinkedIn’s Prue Cox. DocuSign, a cloud-based e-signature platform, is a case in point. It boomed through Covid and has just launched a brand campaign with influencers like Boost Juice’s Janine Allis and former Nine host Jules Lund. CMO Andrea Dixon says DocuSign had to pivot from B2B to “business to everyone” – virtually overnight. Meanwhile, Zenith Media CEO Nickie Scriven reckons there’s a real opportunity for B2B firms to lift their cut-through on lead gen. “I get at least 20 (emails) a day and I just delete every single one of them,” she says.

38:13

EP176 - S1

25 Nov 21

Behavioural economics? What 23 fierce auto rivals did together to make 3 million car owners do something they didn’t want to

In 2018 Australian carmakers were collectively rattled. The consumer and competition regulator, the ACCC, dropped a bombshell on the auto industry in the form of the biggest mandatory product recall ever in Australia – 4.1 million faulty and potentially deadly Takata airbags in more than 3 million vehicles had to be replaced. The problem? Car owners were apathetic and entirely disinterested. Here’s how 23 car brands joined forces to head-off hefty ACCC penalties and deployed a media strategy that got spooked automakers to a 99.9% success rate. And a happy ACCC.

Behavioural economics? What 23 fierce auto rivals did together to make 3 million car owners do something they didn’t want to

In 2018 Australian carmakers were collectively rattled. The consumer and competition regulator, the ACCC, dropped a bombshell on the auto industry in the form of the biggest mandatory product recall ever in Australia – 4.1 million faulty and potentially deadly Takata airbags in more than 3 million vehicles had to be replaced. The problem? Car owners were apathetic and entirely disinterested. Here’s how 23 car brands joined forces to head-off hefty ACCC penalties and deployed a media strategy that got spooked automakers to a 99.9% success rate. And a happy ACCC.

31:31

EP175 - S1

22 Nov 21

‘Yahoo is back’: new owners, 5m Aussie emails, a powering AR creative studio, digital publishing, DSPs, SSPs and ‘community gardens’, not walled’

Yahoo’s new owners in Apollo Funds Management are backing Yahoo to the max – and the business is bolting. One of the earliest internet platforms is an entirely different beast today but what is Yahoo? Better question: ‘What isn’tYahoo?’ US giant Verizon sold the company to Apollo for $5 billion earlier this year and it’s been unleashed. Yahoo’s a search company, a digital publisher, a creative agency,  a demand- and a sell-side platform used by at least 20 local publishers, an email service used by five million Australians, and a specialist in the emerging market of Augmented, Virtual, and Mixed Reality (AR, VR and MR). “Yahoo is back,” Rachel Page, Yahoo’s GM of Sales, says. And while the Googles and Facebooks of the world are building soaring walls around their products, data and tech, Yahoo has taken a different approach: the community garden. Walled gardens have “some inherent challenges”, Vice President ANZ Paul Sigaloff says. “At Yahoo, it’s a very different approach. It’s about flexibility and collaboration.”

‘Yahoo is back’: new owners, 5m Aussie emails, a powering AR creative studio, digital publishing, DSPs, SSPs and ‘community gardens’, not walled’

Yahoo’s new owners in Apollo Funds Management are backing Yahoo to the max – and the business is bolting. One of the earliest internet platforms is an entirely different beast today but what is Yahoo? Better question: ‘What isn’tYahoo?’ US giant Verizon sold the company to Apollo for $5 billion earlier this year and it’s been unleashed. Yahoo’s a search company, a digital publisher, a creative agency,  a demand- and a sell-side platform used by at least 20 local publishers, an email service used by five million Australians, and a specialist in the emerging market of Augmented, Virtual, and Mixed Reality (AR, VR and MR). “Yahoo is back,” Rachel Page, Yahoo’s GM of Sales, says. And while the Googles and Facebooks of the world are building soaring walls around their products, data and tech, Yahoo has taken a different approach: the community garden. Walled gardens have “some inherent challenges”, Vice President ANZ Paul Sigaloff says. “At Yahoo, it’s a very different approach. It’s about flexibility and collaboration.”

38:22

EP174 - S1

18 Nov 21

NRMA brand was ‘tanking’: Why Brent Smart and The Monkeys won the 2021 Grand Effie: $300m lift in brand value after four years investing 70% of budget in brand over performance; competitors treating customers as ‘fools’

NRMA Insurance was “tanking” before IAG CMO Brent Smart returned from New York and appointed Accenture’s The Monkeys, without a pitch, in an early Australian textbook execution of Les Binet and Peter Field’s work around the business impact of investing long-term in brand. Smart went further but was unwavering from the get-go – as were The Monkeys - about returning to “HELP" in late 2017, according to a redacted entry submission to the Effies seen by Mi3. A series of brand-led campaigns, spearheaded by The Monkeys, took out the Advertising Council’s Grand Effie Award last month for returning the ailing insurance company to category-leading growth. But just how bad were things at NRMA Insurance, and how and why did they return to a 20-year-old idea? Smart and The Monkeys’ CEO Mark Green and Chief Strategy Officer Fabio Buresti get brutally honest.  

NRMA brand was ‘tanking’: Why Brent Smart and The Monkeys won the 2021 Grand Effie: $300m lift in brand value after four years investing 70% of budget in brand over performance; competitors treating customers as ‘fools’

NRMA Insurance was “tanking” before IAG CMO Brent Smart returned from New York and appointed Accenture’s The Monkeys, without a pitch, in an early Australian textbook execution of Les Binet and Peter Field’s work around the business impact of investing long-term in brand. Smart went further but was unwavering from the get-go – as were The Monkeys - about returning to “HELP" in late 2017, according to a redacted entry submission to the Effies seen by Mi3. A series of brand-led campaigns, spearheaded by The Monkeys, took out the Advertising Council’s Grand Effie Award last month for returning the ailing insurance company to category-leading growth. But just how bad were things at NRMA Insurance, and how and why did they return to a 20-year-old idea? Smart and The Monkeys’ CEO Mark Green and Chief Strategy Officer Fabio Buresti get brutally honest.  

45:01

EP173 - S1

15 Nov 21

Why Accenture Strategy’s Stijn De Vriendt left to lead Tightrope, RyanCap’s boutique strategy play targeting mature mid-tier and high growth scale-ups

Most Australian mid-size businesses and up in Australia have hired very smart consultants, developed new business strategies and growth plans … and then seen most or all of the work shelved. “It’s about 90 per cent opportunity, 10 per cent frustration,” says Tightrope’s Managing Director Stijn De Vriendt, the former Strategy Director at Accenture Strategy. Tightrope is RyanCap’s new boutique strategy consultancy, which has a sweet spot positioned just below the big end of consulting and strategy advisors like Bain, McKinsey, Accenture and the big four audit and consulting giants. Typically they’re too big – and perhaps too expensive - for mature mid-tier companies grappling with business transformation programs and high-growth scale-up companies needing to go to the next level but lacking the internal horsepower to get there. Tightrope is pulling the best attributes from agencies and consulting firms to target digital pureplays – aka “the disruptors” – and helping them scale, as well as legacy bricks and mortar businesses – aka “the disrupted” – to help them go digital. But instead of just writing a report and leaving, Tightrope wants to do more. “We don’t just stop at strategy,” De Vriendt says. “We want to go beyond and develop prototypes, test those with customers, and help a client get ready to actually scale.” And Tightrope says the balancing act is already working.

Why Accenture Strategy’s Stijn De Vriendt left to lead Tightrope, RyanCap’s boutique strategy play targeting mature mid-tier and high growth scale-ups

Most Australian mid-size businesses and up in Australia have hired very smart consultants, developed new business strategies and growth plans … and then seen most or all of the work shelved. “It’s about 90 per cent opportunity, 10 per cent frustration,” says Tightrope’s Managing Director Stijn De Vriendt, the former Strategy Director at Accenture Strategy. Tightrope is RyanCap’s new boutique strategy consultancy, which has a sweet spot positioned just below the big end of consulting and strategy advisors like Bain, McKinsey, Accenture and the big four audit and consulting giants. Typically they’re too big – and perhaps too expensive - for mature mid-tier companies grappling with business transformation programs and high-growth scale-up companies needing to go to the next level but lacking the internal horsepower to get there. Tightrope is pulling the best attributes from agencies and consulting firms to target digital pureplays – aka “the disruptors” – and helping them scale, as well as legacy bricks and mortar businesses – aka “the disrupted” – to help them go digital. But instead of just writing a report and leaving, Tightrope wants to do more. “We don’t just stop at strategy,” De Vriendt says. “We want to go beyond and develop prototypes, test those with customers, and help a client get ready to actually scale.” And Tightrope says the balancing act is already working.

31:02

EP172 - S1

11 Nov 21

Advertising Hall of Fame: Sarah Barclay, Faie Davis first two Australian women inductees ever with tales of inventing Singapore Girl, blokes doing feminine hygiene, badly; Warren Brown reveals a fateful moment with Brad Pitt

Advertising legends Faie Davis and Sarah Barclay, creators of iconic ads from Yellow Pages’ “Not Happy Jan” to Singapore Airlines’ Singapore Girl have been inducted into the AWARD Advertising Hall of Fame. They’re the first two women ever to have made the list, even an agency – The Campaign Palace – was inducted before a woman made the hallowed halls. Joining them on the podium is Warren Brown, co-founder of BMF, crafter of brilliant ideas and raconteur extraordinaire – even with 20 per cent of his brain hacked out after a stroke. Here’s some fabulous tales and instructive views on the state of advertising today.

Advertising Hall of Fame: Sarah Barclay, Faie Davis first two Australian women inductees ever with tales of inventing Singapore Girl, blokes doing feminine hygiene, badly; Warren Brown reveals a fateful moment with Brad Pitt

Advertising legends Faie Davis and Sarah Barclay, creators of iconic ads from Yellow Pages’ “Not Happy Jan” to Singapore Airlines’ Singapore Girl have been inducted into the AWARD Advertising Hall of Fame. They’re the first two women ever to have made the list, even an agency – The Campaign Palace – was inducted before a woman made the hallowed halls. Joining them on the podium is Warren Brown, co-founder of BMF, crafter of brilliant ideas and raconteur extraordinaire – even with 20 per cent of his brain hacked out after a stroke. Here’s some fabulous tales and instructive views on the state of advertising today.

01:20:38

EP171 - S1

8 Nov 21

Network 10 grew Big Bash cricket by 370% in its first year, says A-Leagues will go bigger; touts ‘incredibly valuable’ ad spots in Paramount+ games

When the Big Bash League started on Network 10 in 2013, it was, well, not very big. But its audience skyrocketed by 370 per cent in the first year alone. “We know how to take a sport, bring it into the free to air landscape and grow it even bigger,” says Nick Bower, Sport Sales Director from 10 ViacomCBS. The network plans to do more of the same with the A-Leagues, and is adding the first ad slots to new streaming service Paramount+ to entice advertisers. “The only way to get access to that incredibly valuable and rich audience within that streaming service is through our football coverage,” Bower says. Ant Hearne, A-Leagues’ Chief Commercial Officer, reckons the challenge is one of conversion: There are 8 million football fans in Australia, but viewers compare the standard to the “incomparable” leagues in Europe. “The conversation has got more into what we’re not, rather than what we are,” he says – but he’s out to change all that.

Network 10 grew Big Bash cricket by 370% in its first year, says A-Leagues will go bigger; touts ‘incredibly valuable’ ad spots in Paramount+ games

When the Big Bash League started on Network 10 in 2013, it was, well, not very big. But its audience skyrocketed by 370 per cent in the first year alone. “We know how to take a sport, bring it into the free to air landscape and grow it even bigger,” says Nick Bower, Sport Sales Director from 10 ViacomCBS. The network plans to do more of the same with the A-Leagues, and is adding the first ad slots to new streaming service Paramount+ to entice advertisers. “The only way to get access to that incredibly valuable and rich audience within that streaming service is through our football coverage,” Bower says. Ant Hearne, A-Leagues’ Chief Commercial Officer, reckons the challenge is one of conversion: There are 8 million football fans in Australia, but viewers compare the standard to the “incomparable” leagues in Europe. “The conversation has got more into what we’re not, rather than what we are,” he says – but he’s out to change all that.

39:00

EP170 - S1

4 Nov 21

De-identified data is no longer enough: Brands, publishers and media supply chain face fundamental changes as Australia’s privacy regulators go harder than GDPR; status quo upended for tracking, targeting and consent

The definition of what counts as personal information is set to change in Australia – with online identifiers even down to geolocation under review, alongside use of loyalty and credit card data – while the very definition of consumer consent is being primed for change by privacy lawmakers and enforcers. The upshot is that the fundamentals that have underpinned digital advertising’s tracking and targeting capabilities may be culled or significantly curtailed – and data privacy experts think Australia’s rules are set to be tighter than GDPR. Meanwhile, those that flout incoming law changes may find themselves open to class actions as well as regulatory punishment.  Lauren Solomon, CEO of the Consumer Policy Research Centre, former deputy New South Wales Privacy Commissioner Anna Johnston, Peter Leonard, professor of practice at UNSW's Business School, and Guardian MD, Dan Stinton, unpack what’s coming down the track for Australian brands, publishers, tech platforms and the media supply chain.

De-identified data is no longer enough: Brands, publishers and media supply chain face fundamental changes as Australia’s privacy regulators go harder than GDPR; status quo upended for tracking, targeting and consent

The definition of what counts as personal information is set to change in Australia – with online identifiers even down to geolocation under review, alongside use of loyalty and credit card data – while the very definition of consumer consent is being primed for change by privacy lawmakers and enforcers. The upshot is that the fundamentals that have underpinned digital advertising’s tracking and targeting capabilities may be culled or significantly curtailed – and data privacy experts think Australia’s rules are set to be tighter than GDPR. Meanwhile, those that flout incoming law changes may find themselves open to class actions as well as regulatory punishment.  Lauren Solomon, CEO of the Consumer Policy Research Centre, former deputy New South Wales Privacy Commissioner Anna Johnston, Peter Leonard, professor of practice at UNSW's Business School, and Guardian MD, Dan Stinton, unpack what’s coming down the track for Australian brands, publishers, tech platforms and the media supply chain.

40:50

EP169 - S1

1 Nov 21

Editors at The Age, The Australian, The Herald and The West Australian on where audiences have shifted post-Covid – and the rich pools advertisers should be fishing in

In the middle of a global pandemic, the Sydney Morning Herald and The Age watched lifestyle content numbers boom. They dropped the quantity and boosted the quality of non-news content, embraced newsletters, and it paid off in spades. “The top of the homepage can be so grim,” Executive Editor Tory Maguire says. “But if we present [other content] properly to our audience, they’re really engaging with it.” The Australia’s editor, Michelle Gunn, saw the same. “People yearned for lifestyle content, rich storytelling, stories which took them away,” she says. “We saw a strong move towards weekends.” The West Australian saw a surge in readers, but also for its late TV show and morning radio audiences. “Some of the numbers we were seeing during live streaming of press conferences would rival traditional TV and traditional radio,” says Editor in Chief Anthony De Ceglie. All of which presents advertisers with new options now Australia is opening up.

Editors at The Age, The Australian, The Herald and The West Australian on where audiences have shifted post-Covid – and the rich pools advertisers should be fishing in

In the middle of a global pandemic, the Sydney Morning Herald and The Age watched lifestyle content numbers boom. They dropped the quantity and boosted the quality of non-news content, embraced newsletters, and it paid off in spades. “The top of the homepage can be so grim,” Executive Editor Tory Maguire says. “But if we present [other content] properly to our audience, they’re really engaging with it.” The Australia’s editor, Michelle Gunn, saw the same. “People yearned for lifestyle content, rich storytelling, stories which took them away,” she says. “We saw a strong move towards weekends.” The West Australian saw a surge in readers, but also for its late TV show and morning radio audiences. “Some of the numbers we were seeing during live streaming of press conferences would rival traditional TV and traditional radio,” says Editor in Chief Anthony De Ceglie. All of which presents advertisers with new options now Australia is opening up.

43:52

EP168 - S1

28 Oct 21

Marketing Academy CEO Sherilyn Shackell: CMOs more powerful post-pandemic but stretched to limits; agencies must stem talent blood loss to survive

Marketers have been smashed by the pandemic – but have emerged more powerful, with much bigger, broader remits, according to The Marketing Academy CEO, Sherilyn Shackell. The Academy has spoken with thousands of marketers over the last 18 months and finds greater numbers are becoming board members and CEOs. But they must now carry even greater weight under broader demands and silo-busting skillset requirements.  Agencies, however, are struggling to stem severe blood loss. Leaders must step up – because their people are burnt out and disillusioned – and new blood is in short supply. Shackell sees more in-housing incoming. Both agencies and brands, she says, underestimate the need for ‘soft’ skills around leadership and staff wellbeing at their peril. “If you don't look after that stuff, you're shafted.” 

Marketing Academy CEO Sherilyn Shackell: CMOs more powerful post-pandemic but stretched to limits; agencies must stem talent blood loss to survive

Marketers have been smashed by the pandemic – but have emerged more powerful, with much bigger, broader remits, according to The Marketing Academy CEO, Sherilyn Shackell. The Academy has spoken with thousands of marketers over the last 18 months and finds greater numbers are becoming board members and CEOs. But they must now carry even greater weight under broader demands and silo-busting skillset requirements.  Agencies, however, are struggling to stem severe blood loss. Leaders must step up – because their people are burnt out and disillusioned – and new blood is in short supply. Shackell sees more in-housing incoming. Both agencies and brands, she says, underestimate the need for ‘soft’ skills around leadership and staff wellbeing at their peril. “If you don't look after that stuff, you're shafted.” 

37:02

EP167 - S1

25 Oct 21

‘Before you thump the table and expect clients to buy engagement you need to prove it delivers better results’, says Foxtel; Westpac brand chief Jenny Melhuish agrees, but the bank is testing the water

The marketing and media world are rushing to get to market first with engagement metrics – or at least talk about them. But how is that playing out on the ground, and are brands ready? “Before you can go to market and thump the table and expect clients to buy to engagement, you need to be really clear about … the proof that engagement can deliver better results for brands,” says Foxtel Media’s Customer Engagement Director, Toby Dewar. Westpac brand, media and ad chief Jenny Melhuish says the bank is testing engagement and attention-based campaigns but agrees the metrics are yet to catch up with prevailing market sentiment. “The CPM metric is a rational one… we need to believe in the robustness of a metric, and currently, we don’t have a robust metric.” Either way, Saatchi & Saatchi CEO Anthony Gregorio says the creative is vital, whatever metrics people use: “If no-one is paying attention to your message, then it doesn’t really matter how good the media buy is.”

‘Before you thump the table and expect clients to buy engagement you need to prove it delivers better results’, says Foxtel; Westpac brand chief Jenny Melhuish agrees, but the bank is testing the water

The marketing and media world are rushing to get to market first with engagement metrics – or at least talk about them. But how is that playing out on the ground, and are brands ready? “Before you can go to market and thump the table and expect clients to buy to engagement, you need to be really clear about … the proof that engagement can deliver better results for brands,” says Foxtel Media’s Customer Engagement Director, Toby Dewar. Westpac brand, media and ad chief Jenny Melhuish says the bank is testing engagement and attention-based campaigns but agrees the metrics are yet to catch up with prevailing market sentiment. “The CPM metric is a rational one… we need to believe in the robustness of a metric, and currently, we don’t have a robust metric.” Either way, Saatchi & Saatchi CEO Anthony Gregorio says the creative is vital, whatever metrics people use: “If no-one is paying attention to your message, then it doesn’t really matter how good the media buy is.”

44:54

EP166 - S1

21 Oct 21

The $200bn black hole: Marketers wasting a third of budgets by giving agencies crap briefs, don’t even know their strategy is non-existent; here’s the proof and how to fix it

Professor Mark Ritson was right all along: “90 per cent of marketers fail to brief agencies effectively, and their failures begin with a total lack of strategy.” The headline findings of the Better Briefs Project and its research spanning 1,700 marketers and agencies make for grim reading. Marketers don’t even realise their briefs are mostly duds, yet agencies are “screaming for objectives”, according to report co-creators, strategists Pieter-Paul von Weiler and Matt Davies. Unless things improve, marketer tenures – and marketing and advertising’s standing within boardrooms – will continue to decline. But there are some very simple fixes. Applying them promises to repair the marketer-agency disconnect – and deliver advertising that moves the needle. 

The $200bn black hole: Marketers wasting a third of budgets by giving agencies crap briefs, don’t even know their strategy is non-existent; here’s the proof and how to fix it

Professor Mark Ritson was right all along: “90 per cent of marketers fail to brief agencies effectively, and their failures begin with a total lack of strategy.” The headline findings of the Better Briefs Project and its research spanning 1,700 marketers and agencies make for grim reading. Marketers don’t even realise their briefs are mostly duds, yet agencies are “screaming for objectives”, according to report co-creators, strategists Pieter-Paul von Weiler and Matt Davies. Unless things improve, marketer tenures – and marketing and advertising’s standing within boardrooms – will continue to decline. But there are some very simple fixes. Applying them promises to repair the marketer-agency disconnect – and deliver advertising that moves the needle. 

39:19

EP165 - S1

18 Oct 21

Marketers ‘set up for failure’ by arbitrary growth targets and short-term budget boosts, but building a scientific model can get C-suite buy in

How a marketer’s budget is set is often doomed to fail, Pet Circle CMO Jon Wild says. Typically, it stems from a business’s growth target. “There’s an arbitrary increase to marketing spend and you’re told to go hit the target. Typically, you fall short in the first quarter, and it’s death by a thousand cuts for the remainder of the year.” That method is “set up for failure”, he says. Rather, growth should be function of the whole company – with marketing being one factor – working towards those targets. Budgets and spend is the last of eight steps detailed in a new book from Atomic212’s James Dixon and Claire Fenner on how to build an Effective Media System. “The place we want to get to is where we know for every dollar we spend on media, what we’re going to get back out,” Dixon says.

Marketers ‘set up for failure’ by arbitrary growth targets and short-term budget boosts, but building a scientific model can get C-suite buy in

How a marketer’s budget is set is often doomed to fail, Pet Circle CMO Jon Wild says. Typically, it stems from a business’s growth target. “There’s an arbitrary increase to marketing spend and you’re told to go hit the target. Typically, you fall short in the first quarter, and it’s death by a thousand cuts for the remainder of the year.” That method is “set up for failure”, he says. Rather, growth should be function of the whole company – with marketing being one factor – working towards those targets. Budgets and spend is the last of eight steps detailed in a new book from Atomic212’s James Dixon and Claire Fenner on how to build an Effective Media System. “The place we want to get to is where we know for every dollar we spend on media, what we’re going to get back out,” Dixon says.

42:06

EP164 - S1

18 Oct 21

10 ViacomCBS’s Upfronts preview: I’m a Celebrity, Survivor, MasterChef, the streaming shift from primetime ratings to lifetime engagement and ‘feeding the hungry beast’

10 ViacomCBS will headline its 2022 Upfronts by touting its credentials as a more diverse, full-service broadcaster with room to grow and a big hitting content slate straight out of the gates. I’m a Celebrity starts on January 3, with Survivor and MasterChef hot on its heels. After that, “you’re into that pattern of big franchises all year,” says Chief Content Officer Beverley McGarvey. “It’s about consistency, maintaining big brands, but also adding some fresh content and fresh shows.” The network is investing heavily in streaming service Paramount+, which McGarvey admits is “a hungry beast that you need to feed with lots of new shows all the time”. Key to the new 10ViacomCBS offering is its full suite: “Paramount+, 10Play, MTV, Nickelodeon… we don’t run those businesses separately,” Jarrod Villani, Chief Operating and Commercial Officer, says. “Bev and I have oversight over all of those businesses.”

10 ViacomCBS’s Upfronts preview: I’m a Celebrity, Survivor, MasterChef, the streaming shift from primetime ratings to lifetime engagement and ‘feeding the hungry beast’

10 ViacomCBS will headline its 2022 Upfronts by touting its credentials as a more diverse, full-service broadcaster with room to grow and a big hitting content slate straight out of the gates. I’m a Celebrity starts on January 3, with Survivor and MasterChef hot on its heels. After that, “you’re into that pattern of big franchises all year,” says Chief Content Officer Beverley McGarvey. “It’s about consistency, maintaining big brands, but also adding some fresh content and fresh shows.” The network is investing heavily in streaming service Paramount+, which McGarvey admits is “a hungry beast that you need to feed with lots of new shows all the time”. Key to the new 10ViacomCBS offering is its full suite: “Paramount+, 10Play, MTV, Nickelodeon… we don’t run those businesses separately,” Jarrod Villani, Chief Operating and Commercial Officer, says. “Bev and I have oversight over all of those businesses.”

34:13

EP163 - S1

14 Oct 21

Apple turned-over: How Dell pulled out of price wars to go premium with a massive brand push, smashed sales and made a hero of marketing in the process

Dell tops US$94 billion in revenues, but it had been in a perpetual street fight on pricing for years and was losing margin with brand health metrics flatlining. With a new premium push it went large on brand, inviting Australia’s publishers to pitch their ideas. Around 150 publishers turned up, the response blowing away marketing boss Arjun Dueskar. Opting to go with 10ViacomCBS and MediaCom, the results have been “phenomenal” with double-digit growth continuing quarter on quarter since the start of 2020 and brand metrics rocketing. Now marketing is getting all the plaudits – and board backing to go harder on brand investment. 

Apple turned-over: How Dell pulled out of price wars to go premium with a massive brand push, smashed sales and made a hero of marketing in the process

Dell tops US$94 billion in revenues, but it had been in a perpetual street fight on pricing for years and was losing margin with brand health metrics flatlining. With a new premium push it went large on brand, inviting Australia’s publishers to pitch their ideas. Around 150 publishers turned up, the response blowing away marketing boss Arjun Dueskar. Opting to go with 10ViacomCBS and MediaCom, the results have been “phenomenal” with double-digit growth continuing quarter on quarter since the start of 2020 and brand metrics rocketing. Now marketing is getting all the plaudits – and board backing to go harder on brand investment. 

35:33

EP162 - S1

11 Oct 21

‘Perfect storm’ of tech, e-commerce and household savings growth means brands are about to hit pay dirt, say Coles CMO Lisa Ronson, Seven’s David Koch, Kurt Burnette

The QR code was once the daggy tech no-one wanted - but it’s now back, and even David “Kochie” Koch’s 87-year-old mother is using them. Five years of e-commerce development has been squeezed into the past 18 months, and Aussies haven’t been able to spend their money in lockdowns. “The economy is going to come out with a vengeance,” Koch, the host of Seven’s Sunrise and Pinstripe Media chair, says. People have money and they want to spend it. Forward bookings with Seven are “extraordinary”, Chief Revenue Officer Kurt Burnette says. “71 per cent of connected TV viewers use their mobile to look up related content… the time between being inspired and purchasing is shrinking,” he says. “All of these trends that are happening are making this the perfect storm.” Coles CMO Lisa Ronson says e-commerce sales have soared – and they don’t expect them to slow. Brands that aren’t ready will be left behind.

‘Perfect storm’ of tech, e-commerce and household savings growth means brands are about to hit pay dirt, say Coles CMO Lisa Ronson, Seven’s David Koch, Kurt Burnette

The QR code was once the daggy tech no-one wanted - but it’s now back, and even David “Kochie” Koch’s 87-year-old mother is using them. Five years of e-commerce development has been squeezed into the past 18 months, and Aussies haven’t been able to spend their money in lockdowns. “The economy is going to come out with a vengeance,” Koch, the host of Seven’s Sunrise and Pinstripe Media chair, says. People have money and they want to spend it. Forward bookings with Seven are “extraordinary”, Chief Revenue Officer Kurt Burnette says. “71 per cent of connected TV viewers use their mobile to look up related content… the time between being inspired and purchasing is shrinking,” he says. “All of these trends that are happening are making this the perfect storm.” Coles CMO Lisa Ronson says e-commerce sales have soared – and they don’t expect them to slow. Brands that aren’t ready will be left behind.

39:27

EP161 - S1

7 Oct 21

Part 2: Cheat’s guide to the ACCC’s final Digital Advertising Services report - the six recommendations unpacked

The second and final episode in our two-part series breaks down five of the six recommendations in the ACCC report to the Federal government on the Digital Advertising Services inquiry – the first recommendation was covered in Part 1 yesterday. On the mics again today for the follow up are Peter Leonard, Professor of Practice at UNSW Business School, advisor at law firm Gilbert + Tobin and principal of Data Strategies; Gai Le Roy, CEO at the IAB; Dan Stinton, Managing Director at The Guardian Australia and Kristiaan Kroon, Chief Investment Officer at OMG. Buckle in because as our experts say in this two-part series, apathy won’t work for the industry this time. It's no time to ignore the regulators.   

Part 2: Cheat’s guide to the ACCC’s final Digital Advertising Services report - the six recommendations unpacked

The second and final episode in our two-part series breaks down five of the six recommendations in the ACCC report to the Federal government on the Digital Advertising Services inquiry – the first recommendation was covered in Part 1 yesterday. On the mics again today for the follow up are Peter Leonard, Professor of Practice at UNSW Business School, advisor at law firm Gilbert + Tobin and principal of Data Strategies; Gai Le Roy, CEO at the IAB; Dan Stinton, Managing Director at The Guardian Australia and Kristiaan Kroon, Chief Investment Officer at OMG. Buckle in because as our experts say in this two-part series, apathy won’t work for the industry this time. It's no time to ignore the regulators.   

39:18

EP160 - S1

5 Oct 21

Part 1: Cheats guide to the ACCC’s final Digital Advertising Services Inquiry - everything explained for marketers, agencies, media and tech

Avoid reading another 200 page ACCC probe with this two-part series on the regulator’s final recommendations to the Federal Government from the Digital Advertising Services Inquiry. Google is squarely in the spotlight but as our panel of industry experts warn, what the ACCC is doing to Google is an early signal for broader industry. In today’s heavyweight line-up: Peter Leonard, Professor of Practice at UNSW Business School, advisor at law firm Gilbert + Tobin and Principal at Data Strategies; Dan Stinton, Managing Director at The Guardian Australia; Gai Le Roy, CEO at the IAB and Kristiaan Kroon, Chief Investment Officer at OMG. 

Part 1: Cheats guide to the ACCC’s final Digital Advertising Services Inquiry - everything explained for marketers, agencies, media and tech

Avoid reading another 200 page ACCC probe with this two-part series on the regulator’s final recommendations to the Federal Government from the Digital Advertising Services Inquiry. Google is squarely in the spotlight but as our panel of industry experts warn, what the ACCC is doing to Google is an early signal for broader industry. In today’s heavyweight line-up: Peter Leonard, Professor of Practice at UNSW Business School, advisor at law firm Gilbert + Tobin and Principal at Data Strategies; Dan Stinton, Managing Director at The Guardian Australia; Gai Le Roy, CEO at the IAB and Kristiaan Kroon, Chief Investment Officer at OMG. 

27:59

EP159 - S1

4 Oct 21

Australian brands are behind on ESG messaging, but post-Covid TV viewing habits, and booming back catalogues, make for a fast – and sustainable – solution

Consider a few stats: The Discovery Channel, Turbo, TLC and Animal Planet are having their best ratings years – ever. Back catalogue episodes are booming: Video on-demand consumption of Friends is up 103 per cent. Fifty-six per cent of people have watched more food and cooking shows, and 70 per cent of them said they would keep watching more post-lockdowns. New viewing habits are here to stay. Brands with environmental, social and governance (ESG) goals can tap into this by targeting ads to those audiences. “If someone is going to sit down and watch an hour-long documentary on conservation, then they must be interested in that space,” Rebecca Kent, Discovery’s Senior Vice President of Transformation, says. “There’s lots of opportunity, I’m not seeing us capturing it yet.” Tim Christlieb, BBC Studios’ Director of Branded Services, says the era of a hidden sustainability web page are over. Meanwhile, when we’re all on video calls, all we can talk about is what we’re watching, Foxtel Media’s Daniella Serhan says. “We’re making it really easy for… brands to a part of that conversation.”

Australian brands are behind on ESG messaging, but post-Covid TV viewing habits, and booming back catalogues, make for a fast – and sustainable – solution

Consider a few stats: The Discovery Channel, Turbo, TLC and Animal Planet are having their best ratings years – ever. Back catalogue episodes are booming: Video on-demand consumption of Friends is up 103 per cent. Fifty-six per cent of people have watched more food and cooking shows, and 70 per cent of them said they would keep watching more post-lockdowns. New viewing habits are here to stay. Brands with environmental, social and governance (ESG) goals can tap into this by targeting ads to those audiences. “If someone is going to sit down and watch an hour-long documentary on conservation, then they must be interested in that space,” Rebecca Kent, Discovery’s Senior Vice President of Transformation, says. “There’s lots of opportunity, I’m not seeing us capturing it yet.” Tim Christlieb, BBC Studios’ Director of Branded Services, says the era of a hidden sustainability web page are over. Meanwhile, when we’re all on video calls, all we can talk about is what we’re watching, Foxtel Media’s Daniella Serhan says. “We’re making it really easy for… brands to a part of that conversation.”

34:58

EP158 - S1

30 Sep 21

Walking the talk: BWS’ top marketer on how going all out for local booze brands lifted sales 20%, permanently changed its marketing strategy

When Covid hit, BWS went all out to help local suppliers, which already battered by floods and bush fires, faced risk of extinction. BWS ditched its pre-Covid plan and campaign went all out for localism, launching a competition for independent brewers, distillers and winemakers to get stocked across its 1,400 stores, creating a marketing template for local suppliers to lift and getting locals to vote for the brands stores would stock. The new plan “smashed it,” according to Head of Marketing Vanessa Rowed. The retailer had been hoping for a 5 per cent sales increase, but hit 20 per cent, delivering the “highest ROI of any campaign we’ve run”, according to Carat’s Bianca Falloon. As states plot routes out of lockdown, Rowed thinks localism is here to stay. Meanwhile, she says local brands can help solve the supply chain crunch looming large over Australia’s Christmas retail – and says the Covid “sprint” has permanently changed BWS’ marketing strategy. 

Walking the talk: BWS’ top marketer on how going all out for local booze brands lifted sales 20%, permanently changed its marketing strategy

When Covid hit, BWS went all out to help local suppliers, which already battered by floods and bush fires, faced risk of extinction. BWS ditched its pre-Covid plan and campaign went all out for localism, launching a competition for independent brewers, distillers and winemakers to get stocked across its 1,400 stores, creating a marketing template for local suppliers to lift and getting locals to vote for the brands stores would stock. The new plan “smashed it,” according to Head of Marketing Vanessa Rowed. The retailer had been hoping for a 5 per cent sales increase, but hit 20 per cent, delivering the “highest ROI of any campaign we’ve run”, according to Carat’s Bianca Falloon. As states plot routes out of lockdown, Rowed thinks localism is here to stay. Meanwhile, she says local brands can help solve the supply chain crunch looming large over Australia’s Christmas retail – and says the Covid “sprint” has permanently changed BWS’ marketing strategy. 

32:20

EP157 - S1

27 Sep 21

‘I invite my CFO to creative pitches’: Pet Circle CMO John Wild says hiring analysts, using data bridges destructive divide between finance and marketing, protects budgets

John Wild, the Chief Marketing Officer for Pet Circle, invites his CFO to creative pitches and hires analysts with better data coding skills than the finance team. Why? So they can understand his job and buy into the creative messaging. “It’s incumbent on you to make [CFOs] your friend,” he says. “Make marketing look and smell very much like a financial output. Suddenly, when it comes to cutting costs, you’re not cutting costs, you’re cutting growth, you’re cutting customers, you’re cutting revenue.” Nicole McInnes, Director of Marketing at WW (formerly Weight Watchers), says she used to have “dark weeks” when she worked at eHarmony – when the time came to review media spend. “There is still a lot of misunderstanding in non-marketing executives on the effectiveness of some channels because they don’t have that data,” she says. Too many marketers don’t understand the basics of media and how to demonstrate media’s value, Atomic212’s James Dixon and Claire Fenner say. So much so, they’ve written a book – quite literally – on the topic.

‘I invite my CFO to creative pitches’: Pet Circle CMO John Wild says hiring analysts, using data bridges destructive divide between finance and marketing, protects budgets

John Wild, the Chief Marketing Officer for Pet Circle, invites his CFO to creative pitches and hires analysts with better data coding skills than the finance team. Why? So they can understand his job and buy into the creative messaging. “It’s incumbent on you to make [CFOs] your friend,” he says. “Make marketing look and smell very much like a financial output. Suddenly, when it comes to cutting costs, you’re not cutting costs, you’re cutting growth, you’re cutting customers, you’re cutting revenue.” Nicole McInnes, Director of Marketing at WW (formerly Weight Watchers), says she used to have “dark weeks” when she worked at eHarmony – when the time came to review media spend. “There is still a lot of misunderstanding in non-marketing executives on the effectiveness of some channels because they don’t have that data,” she says. Too many marketers don’t understand the basics of media and how to demonstrate media’s value, Atomic212’s James Dixon and Claire Fenner say. So much so, they’ve written a book – quite literally – on the topic.

53:46

EP156 - S1

23 Sep 21

Attitude adjuster: IPO-bound Australian unicorn SiteMinder CMO plots growth surge as travel rebounds, but says brands, agencies have B2B marketing – and in-housing – all wrong

SiteMinder is likely the biggest Australian tech company you’ve never heard of. The $1.1billion hotel booking system unicorn is headed for an IPO – so that will likely change. But what must also shift is Australia’s attitude to B2B marketing as the boring, rational sibling to B2C, says CMO Mark Renshaw. It’s where the smart money is headed, Renshaw reckons, and can teach FMCG marketers everything they need to know about going direct-to-consumer. Meanwhile, the former Leo Burnett Chief Digital Officer says in-housing is where it’s at – and that media and marketing guns can get a far “deeper” business education sitting within brand teams than agencies. He’s bucking the holdco consolidation model and working with specialists instead, and thinks ANZ’s top talent need no longer head oversees to pick up experience with global giants; the local tech scene provides far more opportunity to drive change than taking instructions from global HQ. 

Attitude adjuster: IPO-bound Australian unicorn SiteMinder CMO plots growth surge as travel rebounds, but says brands, agencies have B2B marketing – and in-housing – all wrong

SiteMinder is likely the biggest Australian tech company you’ve never heard of. The $1.1billion hotel booking system unicorn is headed for an IPO – so that will likely change. But what must also shift is Australia’s attitude to B2B marketing as the boring, rational sibling to B2C, says CMO Mark Renshaw. It’s where the smart money is headed, Renshaw reckons, and can teach FMCG marketers everything they need to know about going direct-to-consumer. Meanwhile, the former Leo Burnett Chief Digital Officer says in-housing is where it’s at – and that media and marketing guns can get a far “deeper” business education sitting within brand teams than agencies. He’s bucking the holdco consolidation model and working with specialists instead, and thinks ANZ’s top talent need no longer head oversees to pick up experience with global giants; the local tech scene provides far more opportunity to drive change than taking instructions from global HQ. 

35:33

EP155 - S1

20 Sep 21

David Jones launched a print mag – and it drove double-digit growth across all its digital channels. Now it’s moving more marketing budget

Most publishers are winding down print operations. David Jones is ramping up – since launching a print magazine five years ago it has seen consistent double-digit growth across each of its digital channels. “The customer is overwhelmed with choice,” David Jones Marketing Communications General Manager Georgia Hack says. So the retailer decided to curate and repurpose its existing branded content into print. “Yes, it is a printed magazine, but it also is a blog on our website. It's a pillar in our email content strategy. It's a pillar on social.” And it’s delivering. News Corp’s Managing Director of Commercial Content, Mike Connaghan, says the need for content can be draining. “All marketers face a chasm of content creation,” he said. “They need the content to fill those channels.” Naturally, News has a solution: David Jones works with its content agency Medium Rare, whose group content director Nick Smith says the secret to branded content success comes down to treating the consumer like a human being.

David Jones launched a print mag – and it drove double-digit growth across all its digital channels. Now it’s moving more marketing budget

Most publishers are winding down print operations. David Jones is ramping up – since launching a print magazine five years ago it has seen consistent double-digit growth across each of its digital channels. “The customer is overwhelmed with choice,” David Jones Marketing Communications General Manager Georgia Hack says. So the retailer decided to curate and repurpose its existing branded content into print. “Yes, it is a printed magazine, but it also is a blog on our website. It's a pillar in our email content strategy. It's a pillar on social.” And it’s delivering. News Corp’s Managing Director of Commercial Content, Mike Connaghan, says the need for content can be draining. “All marketers face a chasm of content creation,” he said. “They need the content to fill those channels.” Naturally, News has a solution: David Jones works with its content agency Medium Rare, whose group content director Nick Smith says the secret to branded content success comes down to treating the consumer like a human being.

43:45

EP154 - S1

16 Sep 21

‘Digital is just not going to get you there’: How fintech Superhero binned the start-up playbook, went large on TV and OOH, smashed growth targets – and is only just getting started

Launched by a former stockbroker and Booktopia’s CTO, Australian fintech Superhero has ripped up the start-up playbook and powered to massive growth off the back of out of home and TV. “To create big impact and really reach scale, brand awareness and credibility, fast... digital just is not going to get you there,” says marketing lead Rachel Hopping. With CommSec and the big four banks worried, she and Hardhat’s Dan Monheit are planning the retail investment and superannuation management platform’s next major push. With 12m Australian trading virgins to target, the plan is to go large – with an IPO more than likely.    

‘Digital is just not going to get you there’: How fintech Superhero binned the start-up playbook, went large on TV and OOH, smashed growth targets – and is only just getting started

Launched by a former stockbroker and Booktopia’s CTO, Australian fintech Superhero has ripped up the start-up playbook and powered to massive growth off the back of out of home and TV. “To create big impact and really reach scale, brand awareness and credibility, fast... digital just is not going to get you there,” says marketing lead Rachel Hopping. With CommSec and the big four banks worried, she and Hardhat’s Dan Monheit are planning the retail investment and superannuation management platform’s next major push. With 12m Australian trading virgins to target, the plan is to go large – with an IPO more than likely.    

35:24

EP153 - S1

13 Sep 21

Foxtel: ‘SVOD will replace Pay TV, AVOD will replace linear TV’; Australia must prepare now for the advertising-based video streaming boom taking off in the US – because it’s about to land

Australia’s streaming market is already crowded. There are only so many people who can sign up to Netflix, Stan, Prime, Binge, Kayo and the rest. That’s before you get to affordability issues – and the audiences for advertisers have been dwindling. Enter AVOD: advertising-based video on demand, where users pay less (or nothing) to see fewer ads. “It will allow people to really target their audience in a way they’ve never been able to do before,” says Foxtel board director Mark Kaner. Foxtel Media CEO, Mark Frain, forecasts ad-supported streaming platforms will come to Australia “pretty quickly”. The future, he says, is lower ad loads – viewers won’t stomach 16 minutes per hour – but more innovation. Thirty second, 10 second, and even shorter ads are paying dividends in the US. Now the Australian market has to prepare for launch – and the return of eyeballs.

Foxtel: ‘SVOD will replace Pay TV, AVOD will replace linear TV’; Australia must prepare now for the advertising-based video streaming boom taking off in the US – because it’s about to land

Australia’s streaming market is already crowded. There are only so many people who can sign up to Netflix, Stan, Prime, Binge, Kayo and the rest. That’s before you get to affordability issues – and the audiences for advertisers have been dwindling. Enter AVOD: advertising-based video on demand, where users pay less (or nothing) to see fewer ads. “It will allow people to really target their audience in a way they’ve never been able to do before,” says Foxtel board director Mark Kaner. Foxtel Media CEO, Mark Frain, forecasts ad-supported streaming platforms will come to Australia “pretty quickly”. The future, he says, is lower ad loads – viewers won’t stomach 16 minutes per hour – but more innovation. Thirty second, 10 second, and even shorter ads are paying dividends in the US. Now the Australian market has to prepare for launch – and the return of eyeballs.

41:28

EP152 - S1

9 Sep 21

‘We will recommend clients pull spend from publishers that do not decarbonise’: GroupM Global chief Christian Juhl bids to build new metrics, puts media on notice

Tasked with rewiring WPP’s media arm, GroupM Global CEO Christian Juhl is going a couple of steps further, attempting to redefine buying metrics and pressure suppliers – i.e. media companies, including Facebook and Google – to decarbonise. If media owners don’t play ball, will GroupM pull dollars? “We’ll certainly make that recommendation,” says Juhl. He thinks focusing on bigger, better global outcomes can make advertising a good place to be for agencies, brands and consumers – and the rewards will follow. Meanwhile, he says incoming ANZ boss Aimee Buchanan has pretty much carte blanche to make sure GroupM is top dog locally. Which means dethroning OMG. 

‘We will recommend clients pull spend from publishers that do not decarbonise’: GroupM Global chief Christian Juhl bids to build new metrics, puts media on notice

Tasked with rewiring WPP’s media arm, GroupM Global CEO Christian Juhl is going a couple of steps further, attempting to redefine buying metrics and pressure suppliers – i.e. media companies, including Facebook and Google – to decarbonise. If media owners don’t play ball, will GroupM pull dollars? “We’ll certainly make that recommendation,” says Juhl. He thinks focusing on bigger, better global outcomes can make advertising a good place to be for agencies, brands and consumers – and the rewards will follow. Meanwhile, he says incoming ANZ boss Aimee Buchanan has pretty much carte blanche to make sure GroupM is top dog locally. Which means dethroning OMG. 

45:53

EP151 - S1

6 Sep 21

‘It’s going to change how we plan digital media’: IAB unpacks Australia’s new Ipsos-powered cross media currency, urges patience from buyers, urgency from publishers, but warns size-obsessed mastheads that numbers may fluctuate

Seismic shifts are underway in cross-media audience measurement, and the IAB is preparing for looming turf wars by becoming the one ring to bind them all. It’s axed Nielsen and pulled in Ipsos – and a return to panels – ahead of the end of cookies and incoming privacy changes. The new metric is set to be in market next year, at least in basic form. But in a country where size matters more than most, there will be pain for publishers, especially tagging laggards – even IAB buyer members are telling agencies to cool their boots on what is coming, and when. Meanwhile, there’s work to do on integrating the Iris metric with total TV measurement system, VOZ, not to mention audio, out of home and the rest, while bringing engagement and attention into play. IAB’s Gai Le Roy, Seven’s Nicole Bence, PHD’s Amelia Ward and Ipsos’ Heather White unpack the fundamentals of media measurement’s future. Next year should prove interesting.

‘It’s going to change how we plan digital media’: IAB unpacks Australia’s new Ipsos-powered cross media currency, urges patience from buyers, urgency from publishers, but warns size-obsessed mastheads that numbers may fluctuate

Seismic shifts are underway in cross-media audience measurement, and the IAB is preparing for looming turf wars by becoming the one ring to bind them all. It’s axed Nielsen and pulled in Ipsos – and a return to panels – ahead of the end of cookies and incoming privacy changes. The new metric is set to be in market next year, at least in basic form. But in a country where size matters more than most, there will be pain for publishers, especially tagging laggards – even IAB buyer members are telling agencies to cool their boots on what is coming, and when. Meanwhile, there’s work to do on integrating the Iris metric with total TV measurement system, VOZ, not to mention audio, out of home and the rest, while bringing engagement and attention into play. IAB’s Gai Le Roy, Seven’s Nicole Bence, PHD’s Amelia Ward and Ipsos’ Heather White unpack the fundamentals of media measurement’s future. Next year should prove interesting.

42:41

EP150 - S1

30 Aug 21

Why a ‘360 view of customers’ has been killed off by smarter, four-dimensional marketing technology and conversational AI, and why brands shouldn’t use zombie CRM systems

Shirish Shrinet gets emails sending him offers and tutorials for make-up. There’s just one problem: he’s never worn any. “This is a classic example of customer experience vs customer expectations,” says Shrinet, SAP’s Senior Director in Customer Experience and Data Management. At some stage, because he bought his wife a present, he was categorised as female somewhere behind the scenes. Artificial Intelligence is changing this. Geraldine McBride, Founder and CEO of AI firm MyWave, says retailers need to shift away from: ‘I’m going to tell you what you should be buying or thinking’. “The world is still stuck in the old paradigm of ‘but I’ve got all the data and I can just enrich it’… that isn’t going to be sufficient.”

Why a ‘360 view of customers’ has been killed off by smarter, four-dimensional marketing technology and conversational AI, and why brands shouldn’t use zombie CRM systems

Shirish Shrinet gets emails sending him offers and tutorials for make-up. There’s just one problem: he’s never worn any. “This is a classic example of customer experience vs customer expectations,” says Shrinet, SAP’s Senior Director in Customer Experience and Data Management. At some stage, because he bought his wife a present, he was categorised as female somewhere behind the scenes. Artificial Intelligence is changing this. Geraldine McBride, Founder and CEO of AI firm MyWave, says retailers need to shift away from: ‘I’m going to tell you what you should be buying or thinking’. “The world is still stuck in the old paradigm of ‘but I’ve got all the data and I can just enrich it’… that isn’t going to be sufficient.”

40:29

EP149 - S1

26 Aug 21

'We weren't willing to overpay for Champions League', but Optus' Clive Dickens backs football to drive customer gains - and subscription aggregation play for slice of $4bn market

Optus is backing football (the big game, not the Australian version) to keep delivering customer growth and retention, particularly amongst immigrant Australians – but VP of Product Development for TV and Content, Clive Dickens, says Nine overpaid for the Champions League. He also has a dig at the naysayers at Seven who didn’t think 7plus could be delivered in nine months – including some of his staff, who subsequently left the building. While BVOD is booming, Dickens says display advertising will continue to “hit the floor” and publishers that can make subscription revenue pay will be those left standing. Which is why Optus aims to take a slice of what it forecasts will soon be a $4bn market with an aggregation play. The former SCA and Seven digital supremo thinks SubHub will help set Optus apart from big dog Telstra and the pack of hungry mobile virtual operators trying to nip its heels. But he’s not committing to numbers just yet. 

'We weren't willing to overpay for Champions League', but Optus' Clive Dickens backs football to drive customer gains - and subscription aggregation play for slice of $4bn market

Optus is backing football (the big game, not the Australian version) to keep delivering customer growth and retention, particularly amongst immigrant Australians – but VP of Product Development for TV and Content, Clive Dickens, says Nine overpaid for the Champions League. He also has a dig at the naysayers at Seven who didn’t think 7plus could be delivered in nine months – including some of his staff, who subsequently left the building. While BVOD is booming, Dickens says display advertising will continue to “hit the floor” and publishers that can make subscription revenue pay will be those left standing. Which is why Optus aims to take a slice of what it forecasts will soon be a $4bn market with an aggregation play. The former SCA and Seven digital supremo thinks SubHub will help set Optus apart from big dog Telstra and the pack of hungry mobile virtual operators trying to nip its heels. But he’s not committing to numbers just yet. 

29:18

EP148 - S1

23 Aug 21

Something to crow about: Inghams bets the farm on data-led Out-of-Home targeting and watched its chickens take off; 30% sales boost, 72% from new buyers

Inghams literally put all of its eggs in one basket with Out-of-Home, exclusively using oOh!Media’s network of retail and street screens to launch ‘The Free Ranger’ chicken – and hit pay dirt. It was a big call. But using Quantium data to target free-range humans, it delivered a 30 per cent increase in The Free Ranger buyers – 72 per cent of whom were new to the brand. “They had not tasted it, they had not seen it, they had not heard of it. That’s the killer number,” Brandt said. “That’s extraordinary.” Bohemia CEO Brett Dawson says it’s now taking a data strategy from other channels and testing it with OOH. “And we’ve got the results… It’s real focus for effect. It’s quite new in the outdoor sector.” Bel Harper, Group Director of Product Strategy for oOh!Media, said the market is now starting to move – reporting a shift away from number of screens to proximity and volume to the store.

Something to crow about: Inghams bets the farm on data-led Out-of-Home targeting and watched its chickens take off; 30% sales boost, 72% from new buyers

Inghams literally put all of its eggs in one basket with Out-of-Home, exclusively using oOh!Media’s network of retail and street screens to launch ‘The Free Ranger’ chicken – and hit pay dirt. It was a big call. But using Quantium data to target free-range humans, it delivered a 30 per cent increase in The Free Ranger buyers – 72 per cent of whom were new to the brand. “They had not tasted it, they had not seen it, they had not heard of it. That’s the killer number,” Brandt said. “That’s extraordinary.” Bohemia CEO Brett Dawson says it’s now taking a data strategy from other channels and testing it with OOH. “And we’ve got the results… It’s real focus for effect. It’s quite new in the outdoor sector.” Bel Harper, Group Director of Product Strategy for oOh!Media, said the market is now starting to move – reporting a shift away from number of screens to proximity and volume to the store.

38:09

EP147 - S1

19 Aug 21

Lion ‘on the hunt’ for growth beyond beer, bigger ads and diversity while booting tropes into touch: Brand chief Anubha Sahasrabuddhe thirsting for change – and about to execute

Returning to Australia after 20 years offshore, former Mars, Wrigley and Coke marketer turned Lion brand chief Anubha Sahasrabuddhe thinks the beer category has lost its way. Now “Lion is on the hunt” for new growth – and it’s looking beyond beer. The plan is to ditch tired tropes and brand positions that Sahasrabuddhe thinks are no longer reflective of Australian society – and harness the diversity and personalisation that craft beer has so successfully tapped. But Sahasrabuddhe isn’t about to throw out Lion’s heritage – and she’s no woke washer, blasting cancel culture for taking the fun out of beer ads, and pretty much everything else. Ironically, she’s aiming to be more New Zealand in Lion’s bid to better represent Australia, in that the Kiwis and the likes of Colenso are “not afraid to take risks, because otherwise you just get wallpaper.” She also tips her hat to rival CUB’s “tough decisions” in prioritising Great Northern over waning brands like VB. And for putting “chicks in ads – with clothes.” This one is refreshing.  

Lion ‘on the hunt’ for growth beyond beer, bigger ads and diversity while booting tropes into touch: Brand chief Anubha Sahasrabuddhe thirsting for change – and about to execute

Returning to Australia after 20 years offshore, former Mars, Wrigley and Coke marketer turned Lion brand chief Anubha Sahasrabuddhe thinks the beer category has lost its way. Now “Lion is on the hunt” for new growth – and it’s looking beyond beer. The plan is to ditch tired tropes and brand positions that Sahasrabuddhe thinks are no longer reflective of Australian society – and harness the diversity and personalisation that craft beer has so successfully tapped. But Sahasrabuddhe isn’t about to throw out Lion’s heritage – and she’s no woke washer, blasting cancel culture for taking the fun out of beer ads, and pretty much everything else. Ironically, she’s aiming to be more New Zealand in Lion’s bid to better represent Australia, in that the Kiwis and the likes of Colenso are “not afraid to take risks, because otherwise you just get wallpaper.” She also tips her hat to rival CUB’s “tough decisions” in prioritising Great Northern over waning brands like VB. And for putting “chicks in ads – with clothes.” This one is refreshing.  

54:13

EP146 - S1

16 Aug 21

How WA health insurer HBF is using digital out-of-home to grow 84 per cent YOY on the east coast – and why programmatic DOOH’s time has come

Digital out-of-home is powering massive east coast growth for WA-based health insurer HBF following a series of campaigns that include JCDecaux’s digital assets. “Our national growth is at plus 55 per cent… [but] 84 per cent increase year-on-year on the east coast,” Head of Marketing Louise Ardagh says. The programmatic out-of-home (pDOOH) sector is starting to motor, says JCDecaux ANZ CEO Steve O’Connor. The firm will make five per cent of digital revenue from programmatic this year and aims to triple that by 2023. A quarter of Australian media agencies have tried programmatic OOH this year alone – and it’s on the cusp of hockey stick growth, per the IAB. “It’s not just experimentation, it’s embedded into their plans for the next couple of years,” says IAB CEO Gai Le Roy. JCDecaux Executive GM of Revenue and Strategy Operations, Cassandra Cameron, says value and speed are key factors in moving the needle: “We’ve been able to get campaigns live in as little as two hours from briefing.”

How WA health insurer HBF is using digital out-of-home to grow 84 per cent YOY on the east coast – and why programmatic DOOH’s time has come

Digital out-of-home is powering massive east coast growth for WA-based health insurer HBF following a series of campaigns that include JCDecaux’s digital assets. “Our national growth is at plus 55 per cent… [but] 84 per cent increase year-on-year on the east coast,” Head of Marketing Louise Ardagh says. The programmatic out-of-home (pDOOH) sector is starting to motor, says JCDecaux ANZ CEO Steve O’Connor. The firm will make five per cent of digital revenue from programmatic this year and aims to triple that by 2023. A quarter of Australian media agencies have tried programmatic OOH this year alone – and it’s on the cusp of hockey stick growth, per the IAB. “It’s not just experimentation, it’s embedded into their plans for the next couple of years,” says IAB CEO Gai Le Roy. JCDecaux Executive GM of Revenue and Strategy Operations, Cassandra Cameron, says value and speed are key factors in moving the needle: “We’ve been able to get campaigns live in as little as two hours from briefing.”

32:20

EP145 - S1

12 Aug 21

Back from the dead: Rebuilding Aussie icon Ampol after 25 years and landing with kids that have never heard of it; brand chief Jenny O’Regan, Saatchis’ Ant Gregorio, Mike Spirkovski and iProspect’s Jason Smith lift the hood

After the best part of three decades, iconic Australian brand Ampol is back from the dead with a massive relaunch across 1,900 fuel and retail stations and an emotive, unmistakably Australian campaign that’s landing with Aussies young and old. Chief Brand Officer Jenny O'Regan, Saatchi & Saatchi CEO Anthony Gregorio and National Chief Creative Officer Mike Spirkovski, plus Jason Smith, Client Partner at Ampol’s media agency iProspect, say the numbers are miles ahead of target as Australians reconnect with road trips and retro cool. O’Regan says the brand campaign is now flipping “grudge purchases” into road trip-fuelling technical product sales – for both drivers and their vehicles. Next up are alternative fuels, ‘net zero’ and electric vehicles. This one’s got plenty in the tank.

Back from the dead: Rebuilding Aussie icon Ampol after 25 years and landing with kids that have never heard of it; brand chief Jenny O’Regan, Saatchis’ Ant Gregorio, Mike Spirkovski and iProspect’s Jason Smith lift the hood

After the best part of three decades, iconic Australian brand Ampol is back from the dead with a massive relaunch across 1,900 fuel and retail stations and an emotive, unmistakably Australian campaign that’s landing with Aussies young and old. Chief Brand Officer Jenny O'Regan, Saatchi & Saatchi CEO Anthony Gregorio and National Chief Creative Officer Mike Spirkovski, plus Jason Smith, Client Partner at Ampol’s media agency iProspect, say the numbers are miles ahead of target as Australians reconnect with road trips and retro cool. O’Regan says the brand campaign is now flipping “grudge purchases” into road trip-fuelling technical product sales – for both drivers and their vehicles. Next up are alternative fuels, ‘net zero’ and electric vehicles. This one’s got plenty in the tank.

37:45

EP144 - S1

9 Aug 21

Purpose doesn’t build brands – it makes them: ME Bank and Dairy Australia on how transparency and ‘no bullshit’ drives growth, cuts risk

Brands with “purpose” in their DNA face the biggest fallout when they make a mistake: think Patagonia and Thank You. So where does that leave everyone else? New research from The Guardian finds purpose drives growth and keeps customers, and demand is climbing. The dairy industry is a major emitter – belching cows emit a shedload of methane – but it’s working to clean up what it can. Dairy Australia is taking an honest approach and targets “change-makers” in its comms – the 50 to 60 per cent of people who are socially conscious, who vote with their wallets and live their values. “The risk is greater if we do nothing and stay quiet,” says Amber Beaumont, Dairy Australia’s Communications Strategy Advisor. Mason Rook, The Guardian’s Commercial Director, says audiences can spot tokenistic gestures, so brands must walk the talk – or get called out. But ME Bank’s Head of Purpose and Customer Advocate, Scott Dare, says a no amount of purpose will cut it if the product is crap: “No-one will be interested.”

Purpose doesn’t build brands – it makes them: ME Bank and Dairy Australia on how transparency and ‘no bullshit’ drives growth, cuts risk

Brands with “purpose” in their DNA face the biggest fallout when they make a mistake: think Patagonia and Thank You. So where does that leave everyone else? New research from The Guardian finds purpose drives growth and keeps customers, and demand is climbing. The dairy industry is a major emitter – belching cows emit a shedload of methane – but it’s working to clean up what it can. Dairy Australia is taking an honest approach and targets “change-makers” in its comms – the 50 to 60 per cent of people who are socially conscious, who vote with their wallets and live their values. “The risk is greater if we do nothing and stay quiet,” says Amber Beaumont, Dairy Australia’s Communications Strategy Advisor. Mason Rook, The Guardian’s Commercial Director, says audiences can spot tokenistic gestures, so brands must walk the talk – or get called out. But ME Bank’s Head of Purpose and Customer Advocate, Scott Dare, says a no amount of purpose will cut it if the product is crap: “No-one will be interested.”

46:39

EP143 - S1

5 Aug 21

Data brokers the new ad networks? Narrative CEO Nick Jordan on why black boxes can’t fix data privacy and won’t appease regulators, and why brands and publishers need to make a choice, now

When data regulators come knocking, black box solutions from data brokers won't fix the compliance issues fast coming at brands. Meanwhile, publishers must avoid a repeat of the audience data heist carried out by ad networks and early programmatic players, reckons New York-based Nick Jordan, CEO of Narrative.io. The former Adobe and Yahoo exec urges the digital ad industry to step up with technical standards for post-cookie IDs to avoid unwittingly handing over everything to walled gardens, although he thinks Google may not actually retire the cookie. Plus, how Apple's privacy push "is all bullshit"; why publishers must "build a brand around their data" to make money from it; why transparency won't work without convenience; and what businesses paralysed by the paradox of ID choice should do next (hint: it's not 'do nothing').

Data brokers the new ad networks? Narrative CEO Nick Jordan on why black boxes can’t fix data privacy and won’t appease regulators, and why brands and publishers need to make a choice, now

When data regulators come knocking, black box solutions from data brokers won't fix the compliance issues fast coming at brands. Meanwhile, publishers must avoid a repeat of the audience data heist carried out by ad networks and early programmatic players, reckons New York-based Nick Jordan, CEO of Narrative.io. The former Adobe and Yahoo exec urges the digital ad industry to step up with technical standards for post-cookie IDs to avoid unwittingly handing over everything to walled gardens, although he thinks Google may not actually retire the cookie. Plus, how Apple's privacy push "is all bullshit"; why publishers must "build a brand around their data" to make money from it; why transparency won't work without convenience; and what businesses paralysed by the paradox of ID choice should do next (hint: it's not 'do nothing').

51:32

EP142 - S1

2 Aug 21

40-year-old millennials now rule the procurement roost – and they are turning B2B into B2C marketing. That means if your brand is bland, you’re already dead

BETA unblockers: Millennials are turning 40. They’re now B2B marketing’s key buyers – and they are making an entirely different set of decisions. A new global study from LinkedIn’s B2B Institute says 75 per cent of Australia’s professional workforce will be millennial “BETAs” by 2025. They’re B – blurring the work/home boundaries, E – evolving rapidly, T – tech natives, and A – activists in how they purchase. Marketers have been “obsessed” with this audience, Lara Brownlow, LinkedIn Australia’s head of agency and channel sales, but now they need to change tactics. Lucie Greene, a futurist, founder of Light Years and an author of the report, says influential BETAs will only buy relevant and aspirational brands. Words wont cut it, says Cisco ANZ director of marketing Ray Kloss – and if brands don’t walk the talk, they are probably toast. Samantha Cunliffe, managing director at Merkle’s DWA Media, says B2B branding has always been “a bit beige”. “Be bold. Don’t be beige.”

40-year-old millennials now rule the procurement roost – and they are turning B2B into B2C marketing. That means if your brand is bland, you’re already dead

BETA unblockers: Millennials are turning 40. They’re now B2B marketing’s key buyers – and they are making an entirely different set of decisions. A new global study from LinkedIn’s B2B Institute says 75 per cent of Australia’s professional workforce will be millennial “BETAs” by 2025. They’re B – blurring the work/home boundaries, E – evolving rapidly, T – tech natives, and A – activists in how they purchase. Marketers have been “obsessed” with this audience, Lara Brownlow, LinkedIn Australia’s head of agency and channel sales, but now they need to change tactics. Lucie Greene, a futurist, founder of Light Years and an author of the report, says influential BETAs will only buy relevant and aspirational brands. Words wont cut it, says Cisco ANZ director of marketing Ray Kloss – and if brands don’t walk the talk, they are probably toast. Samantha Cunliffe, managing director at Merkle’s DWA Media, says B2B branding has always been “a bit beige”. “Be bold. Don’t be beige.”

50:05

EP141 - S1

29 Jul 21

The reputation agenda: If trust is now the biggest driver of growth, corporate affairs has usurped marketing, plus why continued failure on purpose and ESG will set Australian brands even further back

Marketing used to be the biggest driver of sales. Today, consumer behaviour is increasingly influenced by trust – which is corporate affairs’ turf. Meanwhile, Australian firms are realising just how far behind they have slipped to US and European headquartered competitors when it comes to environmental and social governance (ESG), and the sense of purpose employees and external stakeholders now demand of brands. Change is accelerating, warn global executive search specialist Anna Whitlam, Commtract’s Vanessa Liell and Australian Pork’s Andrew ‘Billy’ Baxter. Those that fail to quickly adapt “will just miss out…. and we are already seeing that.” But Australian brands appear live to the threat: demand is soaring for comms professionals that can build relationships internally and externally – “deep specialists” that can drive reputation and integrate with marketing to deliver growth – and balance risk with reward.   

The reputation agenda: If trust is now the biggest driver of growth, corporate affairs has usurped marketing, plus why continued failure on purpose and ESG will set Australian brands even further back

Marketing used to be the biggest driver of sales. Today, consumer behaviour is increasingly influenced by trust – which is corporate affairs’ turf. Meanwhile, Australian firms are realising just how far behind they have slipped to US and European headquartered competitors when it comes to environmental and social governance (ESG), and the sense of purpose employees and external stakeholders now demand of brands. Change is accelerating, warn global executive search specialist Anna Whitlam, Commtract’s Vanessa Liell and Australian Pork’s Andrew ‘Billy’ Baxter. Those that fail to quickly adapt “will just miss out…. and we are already seeing that.” But Australian brands appear live to the threat: demand is soaring for comms professionals that can build relationships internally and externally – “deep specialists” that can drive reputation and integrate with marketing to deliver growth – and balance risk with reward.   

43:58

EP140 - S1

26 Jul 21

ANZ CMO Sweta Mehre on media, in-housing agency services and how linking marketing to business impact is winning new bank allies

What happens when you get a top consumer goods marketer to leap from the biggest advertiser in the world, Procter & Gamble, to lead marketing at a bank? ANZ CMO Sweta Mehre joined ANZ four years ago from P&G and has driven a raft of reforms including a marketing masters program inside the organisation designed to build marketing team capabilities and deepen the understanding of how marketing contributes to commercial results. More people inside ANZ are now championing marketing and less see it purely as a cost centre. Sweta also has some views on inhousing agency services, market mix modelling and media that might surprise a few too. 

ANZ CMO Sweta Mehre on media, in-housing agency services and how linking marketing to business impact is winning new bank allies

What happens when you get a top consumer goods marketer to leap from the biggest advertiser in the world, Procter & Gamble, to lead marketing at a bank? ANZ CMO Sweta Mehre joined ANZ four years ago from P&G and has driven a raft of reforms including a marketing masters program inside the organisation designed to build marketing team capabilities and deepen the understanding of how marketing contributes to commercial results. More people inside ANZ are now championing marketing and less see it purely as a cost centre. Sweta also has some views on inhousing agency services, market mix modelling and media that might surprise a few too. 

53:56

EP139 - S1

19 Jul 21

Going for gold: VOZ faces first test with Tokyo Olympics. Seven says advertisers cannot afford to underestimate its impact; Suncorp CMO eyes real-time results; OMG’s Horgan says it fundamentally alters planning

After years in development, the first weekly top line consolidated VOZ market reports land 22 July. On July 23, Tokyo will host the Opening Ceremony of the Olympic Games. For 17 days, Seven says it will reach nine in 10 Australian homes. Suncorp CMO Mim Haysom spies a huge opportunity for Olympics sponsor AAMI to test the new linear and digital TV measurement service – and bespoke creative – in real time. Seven is also using Adgile Media for real time tracking. Kurt Burnette, Seven’s Chief Revenue Officer, says early data shows major advertiser gains. “We’ve seen that 18-24 adds 15 per cent incremental reach, and 25-39, 11-12 per cent. We’ve seen those good percentage numbers… there’s no set path for this.” OMG CEO Peter Horgan says it will fundamentally change the data underpinning TV planning.

Going for gold: VOZ faces first test with Tokyo Olympics. Seven says advertisers cannot afford to underestimate its impact; Suncorp CMO eyes real-time results; OMG’s Horgan says it fundamentally alters planning

After years in development, the first weekly top line consolidated VOZ market reports land 22 July. On July 23, Tokyo will host the Opening Ceremony of the Olympic Games. For 17 days, Seven says it will reach nine in 10 Australian homes. Suncorp CMO Mim Haysom spies a huge opportunity for Olympics sponsor AAMI to test the new linear and digital TV measurement service – and bespoke creative – in real time. Seven is also using Adgile Media for real time tracking. Kurt Burnette, Seven’s Chief Revenue Officer, says early data shows major advertiser gains. “We’ve seen that 18-24 adds 15 per cent incremental reach, and 25-39, 11-12 per cent. We’ve seen those good percentage numbers… there’s no set path for this.” OMG CEO Peter Horgan says it will fundamentally change the data underpinning TV planning.

48:07

EP138 - S1

15 Jul 21

Part Two: From Prime Ministers to media moguls: John Singleton’s final thoughts and tales on WPP and beyond

The bar at John Singleton Advertising, later Singleton Ogilvy & Mather, was renowned in its prime. State of Origin and Australian and West Indies Cricket teams were named in the agency watering hole but there was a strict no drinking policy by day - you’d be fired. In this final episode, Singleton and his inner circle, Russell Tate and Mike Connaghan, lift the lid on Sir Martin Sorrell and recall how landing KFC changed their fortunes more than 20 years ago. They also argue why “Australian” still has legs.   

Part Two: From Prime Ministers to media moguls: John Singleton’s final thoughts and tales on WPP and beyond

The bar at John Singleton Advertising, later Singleton Ogilvy & Mather, was renowned in its prime. State of Origin and Australian and West Indies Cricket teams were named in the agency watering hole but there was a strict no drinking policy by day - you’d be fired. In this final episode, Singleton and his inner circle, Russell Tate and Mike Connaghan, lift the lid on Sir Martin Sorrell and recall how landing KFC changed their fortunes more than 20 years ago. They also argue why “Australian” still has legs.   

34:03

EP137 - S1

13 Jul 21

Part One: John Singleton, Russell Tate and Mike Connaghan lament lost opportunities for WPP and their once $1bn advertising empire

John Singleton, the troublemaking larrikin adman who’s turning 80 this year, was all but penniless when he returned to advertising in 1985. Then he and his lieutenants, Russell Tate and Mike Connaghan ultimately built a holding company worth close to $1bn. He was “impossible to follow” in a new business pitch but with Singleton’s old group now back firmly in British control after WPP acquired and delisted WPP AUNZ, the trio reflect on what was and what could have been (with some trademark swipes along the way).    

Part One: John Singleton, Russell Tate and Mike Connaghan lament lost opportunities for WPP and their once $1bn advertising empire

John Singleton, the troublemaking larrikin adman who’s turning 80 this year, was all but penniless when he returned to advertising in 1985. Then he and his lieutenants, Russell Tate and Mike Connaghan ultimately built a holding company worth close to $1bn. He was “impossible to follow” in a new business pitch but with Singleton’s old group now back firmly in British control after WPP acquired and delisted WPP AUNZ, the trio reflect on what was and what could have been (with some trademark swipes along the way).    

44:00

EP136 - S1

12 Jul 21

Online behavioural targeting, real time bidding a 'dirty, dirty industry': Why a new landmark European GDPR lawsuit against IAB Tech Lab over the 'world’s biggest data breach’ could hit everyone hard, Australia included, on privacy and online ads

Former adtech insider and The Irish Times innovation boss Dr Johnny Ryan gave evidence before a US Senate Judiciary Committee in 2019 about how the global digital advertising industry was blatantly breaching consumer privacy and user data protection. Ryan is now spearheading a globally significant GDPR lawsuit against the international online ad standards body, IAB Tech Lab, as the fastest way to end real time bidding and behavioural targeting, worldwide. International reform of the entire digital ad industry is at stake. Here’s what you need to know and why Ryan wants to bring down online advertising as we know it, within two years. 

Online behavioural targeting, real time bidding a 'dirty, dirty industry': Why a new landmark European GDPR lawsuit against IAB Tech Lab over the 'world’s biggest data breach’ could hit everyone hard, Australia included, on privacy and online ads

Former adtech insider and The Irish Times innovation boss Dr Johnny Ryan gave evidence before a US Senate Judiciary Committee in 2019 about how the global digital advertising industry was blatantly breaching consumer privacy and user data protection. Ryan is now spearheading a globally significant GDPR lawsuit against the international online ad standards body, IAB Tech Lab, as the fastest way to end real time bidding and behavioural targeting, worldwide. International reform of the entire digital ad industry is at stake. Here’s what you need to know and why Ryan wants to bring down online advertising as we know it, within two years. 

44:11

EP135 - S1

5 Jul 21

I’m under 40, get me out of here! Younger audiences sick of SVOD and TV at home, want real world experiences, human contact and to ‘go big’

The majority of 18- to 39-year-olds watch little to no TV – but while linear TV audiences are trending down, TV advertising is booming. Guy Burbidge, Managing Director of Val Morgan, says advertisers and agencies should prepare for the bigger boom that is unfolding: Cinema. “We’re heading into the best six months of content we’ve ever had, and I can’t put enough of an emphasis on that,” he says. Adding to that, most of that age bracket are desperate to get out. Research from The Owl Insights calls them The Great Escapers, the younger audiences looking for a space beyond home and the workplace – especially if those two are one and the same. “People are wanting to make up for lost time,” Matt Sandwell from The Owl Insights says. “They’re looking to make up for it by going big.”

I’m under 40, get me out of here! Younger audiences sick of SVOD and TV at home, want real world experiences, human contact and to ‘go big’

The majority of 18- to 39-year-olds watch little to no TV – but while linear TV audiences are trending down, TV advertising is booming. Guy Burbidge, Managing Director of Val Morgan, says advertisers and agencies should prepare for the bigger boom that is unfolding: Cinema. “We’re heading into the best six months of content we’ve ever had, and I can’t put enough of an emphasis on that,” he says. Adding to that, most of that age bracket are desperate to get out. Research from The Owl Insights calls them The Great Escapers, the younger audiences looking for a space beyond home and the workplace – especially if those two are one and the same. “People are wanting to make up for lost time,” Matt Sandwell from The Owl Insights says. “They’re looking to make up for it by going big.”

20:16

EP134 - S1

1 Jul 21

Google’s cookie user tracking halt to help ‘performance enhancing dugs’: cookie bombing, last click attribution, bad metrics will see a nasty resurgence

Google’s move late last week to delay by two years the end of third party cookies will likely see brand owners take their foot off the gas to end their reliance on privacy-challenged tracking. But Mi3’s panel of digital experts warn ferociously against it. First party data is king. Keep going. Here’s the complete what, why and what next on Google’s surprise move from top industry digital and data players. 

Google’s cookie user tracking halt to help ‘performance enhancing dugs’: cookie bombing, last click attribution, bad metrics will see a nasty resurgence

Google’s move late last week to delay by two years the end of third party cookies will likely see brand owners take their foot off the gas to end their reliance on privacy-challenged tracking. But Mi3’s panel of digital experts warn ferociously against it. First party data is king. Keep going. Here’s the complete what, why and what next on Google’s surprise move from top industry digital and data players. 

01:09:23

EP133 - S1

28 Jun 21

Sugar hits and substance: Nestlé’s new global media chief heads for Switzerland armed with data, DTC, in-housing and personalisation strategies honed in Sydney

Global CMO Aude Gandon is shaking up Nestlé’s marketing function. With change in the wind Antonia Farquhar, Head of Media, Content and Data, is swapping Sydney for Switzerland and the global media gig. She’s overseen a strategic shift in Nestle’s first party data push and launched its first retail outlets globally – and if local KitKat sales are anything to go by, Byron Sharp’s theories around mental availability are on the money. Farquhar has also honed personalisation strategies via direct-to-consumer channels and while she’s a big platforms proponent, thinks digital marketers neglect ‘legacy’ media and full funnel strategies at their peril. This year, Farquhar also launched a hybrid in-house agency; it’s fast and smart but Nestlé has no plans to take big, “polished” creative duties away from ad agencies just yet. 

Sugar hits and substance: Nestlé’s new global media chief heads for Switzerland armed with data, DTC, in-housing and personalisation strategies honed in Sydney

Global CMO Aude Gandon is shaking up Nestlé’s marketing function. With change in the wind Antonia Farquhar, Head of Media, Content and Data, is swapping Sydney for Switzerland and the global media gig. She’s overseen a strategic shift in Nestle’s first party data push and launched its first retail outlets globally – and if local KitKat sales are anything to go by, Byron Sharp’s theories around mental availability are on the money. Farquhar has also honed personalisation strategies via direct-to-consumer channels and while she’s a big platforms proponent, thinks digital marketers neglect ‘legacy’ media and full funnel strategies at their peril. This year, Farquhar also launched a hybrid in-house agency; it’s fast and smart but Nestlé has no plans to take big, “polished” creative duties away from ad agencies just yet. 

34:25

EP132 - S1

21 Jun 21

Australia’s blue chips can make 90 per cent profit margins from owned media and use it to fund growth. Should publishers be worried?

On average, a large Australian business can unlock $82m annual revenue from its owned media – physical and digital, according to Sonder. The biggest brands could theoretically book $500m. They won’t go that far, but banks, telcos, airlines and consumer packaged goods brands shouldn’t fear ‘tattooing the baby’ – putting other brands on their own, per the firm. But they must recognise the value they are giving away cheaply, or for free. “These organisations are sitting on incredibly powerful media channels, very often undervalued,” says Sonder co-founder Angus Frazer. “Websites, emails, gondola ends, in-store posters… in the connection economy, every medium matters and every medium has value.” Here’s how to unlock yours.

Australia’s blue chips can make 90 per cent profit margins from owned media and use it to fund growth. Should publishers be worried?

On average, a large Australian business can unlock $82m annual revenue from its owned media – physical and digital, according to Sonder. The biggest brands could theoretically book $500m. They won’t go that far, but banks, telcos, airlines and consumer packaged goods brands shouldn’t fear ‘tattooing the baby’ – putting other brands on their own, per the firm. But they must recognise the value they are giving away cheaply, or for free. “These organisations are sitting on incredibly powerful media channels, very often undervalued,” says Sonder co-founder Angus Frazer. “Websites, emails, gondola ends, in-store posters… in the connection economy, every medium matters and every medium has value.” Here’s how to unlock yours.

40:56

EP131 - S1

17 Jun 21

Life after Seven: Airtasker CEO on its new customer growth strategy and bid for global scale without big media backing

ASX-listed ‘gig economy’ platform Airtasker ramped up after selling equity to Seven West Media, “one of the best moves in our history,” says CEO Tim Fung. But that deal ended in March and now he must repeat the trick – while trying to go global – without big media budgets. Fung’s backing Airtasker Listings, its latest iteration, to drive product discovery and power customer growth. So far it’s working, and the ‘long tail’ of local services is starting to wag the dog. But while demand is “exploding”, Australia’s skills crunch is driving up prices.  Fung urges Mi3 readers with skills to join the platform. Even he’s side-hustling for $500 a pop.  

Life after Seven: Airtasker CEO on its new customer growth strategy and bid for global scale without big media backing

ASX-listed ‘gig economy’ platform Airtasker ramped up after selling equity to Seven West Media, “one of the best moves in our history,” says CEO Tim Fung. But that deal ended in March and now he must repeat the trick – while trying to go global – without big media budgets. Fung’s backing Airtasker Listings, its latest iteration, to drive product discovery and power customer growth. So far it’s working, and the ‘long tail’ of local services is starting to wag the dog. But while demand is “exploding”, Australia’s skills crunch is driving up prices.  Fung urges Mi3 readers with skills to join the platform. Even he’s side-hustling for $500 a pop.  

42:16

EP130 - S1

15 Jun 21

Why aren’t ads featuring women funny? How to be funny ha ha, avoid offence and triple engagement from women seeking an ‘antidote to perfection’

Kellogg’s Australian Marketing Director Lucie Wolstenholme has never written humour into an agency brief but says it can do wonders for audience engagement – think Yellow Pages’ ‘Not Happy, Jan’ and BigPond’s ‘Too many rabbits in China’. “It’s a fine art to use humour without falling offensive or flat,” she says. Only a fifth of ads featuring women use humour, compared to more than half of ads featuring men, according to research from Are Media. ABC Radio host and comedian Wendy Harmer reckons 25 to 35-year-old men can’t be expected to write humour well for women. “You need that lived experience and relatability,” she says. Are Media’s Jane Waterhouse says humour delivers in spades: “We found that humour was three times more engaging than standard communication.”

Why aren’t ads featuring women funny? How to be funny ha ha, avoid offence and triple engagement from women seeking an ‘antidote to perfection’

Kellogg’s Australian Marketing Director Lucie Wolstenholme has never written humour into an agency brief but says it can do wonders for audience engagement – think Yellow Pages’ ‘Not Happy, Jan’ and BigPond’s ‘Too many rabbits in China’. “It’s a fine art to use humour without falling offensive or flat,” she says. Only a fifth of ads featuring women use humour, compared to more than half of ads featuring men, according to research from Are Media. ABC Radio host and comedian Wendy Harmer reckons 25 to 35-year-old men can’t be expected to write humour well for women. “You need that lived experience and relatability,” she says. Are Media’s Jane Waterhouse says humour delivers in spades: “We found that humour was three times more engaging than standard communication.”

32:17

EP129 - S1

10 Jun 21

Creamed by media agencies, only ‘small data’ can save publishers about to be pummelled by retail media…if creative agencies don’t sink everyone

Publishers are getting their backsides handed to them by agency groups because the agencies have moved almost entirely away from relationship-based decision making. They may not be leading negotiations, but the data natives are calling the shots.  According to media ecologist and MediaVillage founder, Jack Myers, perhaps only “small data” that unlocks relevant insight can save media sellers – at least those smart enough to stop trying to compete with Google and Facebook. Creative agencies, he says, need to get with the programme or risk dragging legacy media down entirely. 

Creamed by media agencies, only ‘small data’ can save publishers about to be pummelled by retail media…if creative agencies don’t sink everyone

Publishers are getting their backsides handed to them by agency groups because the agencies have moved almost entirely away from relationship-based decision making. They may not be leading negotiations, but the data natives are calling the shots.  According to media ecologist and MediaVillage founder, Jack Myers, perhaps only “small data” that unlocks relevant insight can save media sellers – at least those smart enough to stop trying to compete with Google and Facebook. Creative agencies, he says, need to get with the programme or risk dragging legacy media down entirely. 

42:14

EP128 - S1

7 Jun 21

“Mea culpa” - Sir Martin Sorrell admits he couldn’t move fast enough to reengineer WPP, but says global ad groups must go private, before it’s too late

After three years throwing jabs at erstwhile rivals, Sir Martin Sorrell finally admits he couldn’t change WPP fast enough. He says public company structures doom the holdcos to failure, hobbling their ability to change direction at the requisite speed. Meanwhile, he blasts WPP AUNZ’s attempts to effect change, suggesting the London-controlled group will remain ‘’rudderless’’ if it fails to appoint a strong parochial leader. Naturally, everyone else gets a poke too as Sorrell graces Mi3’s 100th podcast, which probably isn’t suitable for the thin skinned.

“Mea culpa” - Sir Martin Sorrell admits he couldn’t move fast enough to reengineer WPP, but says global ad groups must go private, before it’s too late

After three years throwing jabs at erstwhile rivals, Sir Martin Sorrell finally admits he couldn’t change WPP fast enough. He says public company structures doom the holdcos to failure, hobbling their ability to change direction at the requisite speed. Meanwhile, he blasts WPP AUNZ’s attempts to effect change, suggesting the London-controlled group will remain ‘’rudderless’’ if it fails to appoint a strong parochial leader. Naturally, everyone else gets a poke too as Sorrell graces Mi3’s 100th podcast, which probably isn’t suitable for the thin skinned.

01:02:25

EP127 - S1

31 May 21

'Reach trumps morality every time': Brands talking a good game on diversity but…10 ViacomCBS on “No diversity, no commission” for TV shows

Publishers and programmers believe audiences are more purpose-driven than ever and are pushing hard to reflect greater diversity within their slates. Yet "reach trumps morality every time" when it comes to buying TV ads, according to Innocean Australia CEO Jasmin Bedir. 10 ViacomCBS National Creative Director Michael Stanford and Eureka Productions Head of Entertainment Sophia Mogford on how changing the narrative will help brands keep customers.

'Reach trumps morality every time': Brands talking a good game on diversity but…10 ViacomCBS on “No diversity, no commission” for TV shows

Publishers and programmers believe audiences are more purpose-driven than ever and are pushing hard to reflect greater diversity within their slates. Yet "reach trumps morality every time" when it comes to buying TV ads, according to Innocean Australia CEO Jasmin Bedir. 10 ViacomCBS National Creative Director Michael Stanford and Eureka Productions Head of Entertainment Sophia Mogford on how changing the narrative will help brands keep customers.

35:29

EP126 - S1

27 May 21

Shift happens: Unilever global media chief predicts “seismic” impact from advertisers’ push for cross-media measurement, with Australia “following fast”

Long reluctant to fund industry metrics, advertisers are finally putting their hands in their pockets in a bid to cut out “10 per cent plus” of wasted media spend globally. They are bankrolling a single source pilot for cross-media measurement and Australia has pledged to “fast follow” the UK-US lead on what has been dubbed Project Origin.  The upshot will be “seismic” according to Unilever’s VP, Global Media, Sarah Mansfield and will cause “a lot of angst in some quarters,” acknowledges the AANA’s John Broome. Change is coming and media owners, agencies and measurement providers need to get across it, fast. WFA Director of Global Media Services Matt Green and ISBA’s Project Origin Director, Richard Holtan, join Paul McIntyre on the mics.

Shift happens: Unilever global media chief predicts “seismic” impact from advertisers’ push for cross-media measurement, with Australia “following fast”

Long reluctant to fund industry metrics, advertisers are finally putting their hands in their pockets in a bid to cut out “10 per cent plus” of wasted media spend globally. They are bankrolling a single source pilot for cross-media measurement and Australia has pledged to “fast follow” the UK-US lead on what has been dubbed Project Origin.  The upshot will be “seismic” according to Unilever’s VP, Global Media, Sarah Mansfield and will cause “a lot of angst in some quarters,” acknowledges the AANA’s John Broome. Change is coming and media owners, agencies and measurement providers need to get across it, fast. WFA Director of Global Media Services Matt Green and ISBA’s Project Origin Director, Richard Holtan, join Paul McIntyre on the mics.

44:03

EP125 - S1

24 May 21

Yes, ‘premium’ digital content is a thing: why Dentsu’s Pat Darcy and GroupM’s Claire Butterworth say groundbreaking new research is self-serving but right

Digital marketers have forever resisted the idea that premium digital content exists, due mainly to a two-decade obsession with online direct response tactics. But a groundbreaking research study shows some “premium" sites and content are 2.5x more impactful on memory for brand messages than “run of internet”. GroupM’s Claire Butterworth and Dentsu’s Patrick Darcy say ThinkPremiumDigital's data is self-serving but robust, believable and long needed.

Yes, ‘premium’ digital content is a thing: why Dentsu’s Pat Darcy and GroupM’s Claire Butterworth say groundbreaking new research is self-serving but right

Digital marketers have forever resisted the idea that premium digital content exists, due mainly to a two-decade obsession with online direct response tactics. But a groundbreaking research study shows some “premium" sites and content are 2.5x more impactful on memory for brand messages than “run of internet”. GroupM’s Claire Butterworth and Dentsu’s Patrick Darcy say ThinkPremiumDigital's data is self-serving but robust, believable and long needed.

40:55

EP124 - S1

20 May 21

If we don’t get the balance right, people’s careers suffer and our cultures fade: Why getting home-office balance right will decide media and marketing's future

If people don’t come back to the office, culture suffers – and Australian businesses already appear to have a major culture problem, according to Professor Karl Treacher, with nine in ten workers saying they are happier at home. Workers have had a taste of flexibility and freedom – and while some are desperate to get back to the buzz of office structures, not everybody is buying-in. There’s no going back, so leaders must find a way forward, says OMD’s Amy Buchanan, The Hallway’s Jules Hall, AFL Media’s Sarah Wyse and Pedestrian Group’s Matt Rowley. All while trying to create more sustainable working patterns as the ever-present threat of burnout looms. 

If we don’t get the balance right, people’s careers suffer and our cultures fade: Why getting home-office balance right will decide media and marketing's future

If people don’t come back to the office, culture suffers – and Australian businesses already appear to have a major culture problem, according to Professor Karl Treacher, with nine in ten workers saying they are happier at home. Workers have had a taste of flexibility and freedom – and while some are desperate to get back to the buzz of office structures, not everybody is buying-in. There’s no going back, so leaders must find a way forward, says OMD’s Amy Buchanan, The Hallway’s Jules Hall, AFL Media’s Sarah Wyse and Pedestrian Group’s Matt Rowley. All while trying to create more sustainable working patterns as the ever-present threat of burnout looms. 

44:12

EP123 - S1

17 May 21

QMS Media breaks silence on City of Sydney street furniture blue print to rival world’s best cities

City of Sydney's street furniture network will be 70% digital and boast sustainable materials and “green roof” design features to rival Amsterdam and London as global “connected city” leaders. 

QMS Media breaks silence on City of Sydney street furniture blue print to rival world’s best cities

City of Sydney's street furniture network will be 70% digital and boast sustainable materials and “green roof” design features to rival Amsterdam and London as global “connected city” leaders. 

29:33

EP122 - S1

13 May 21

‘The larger the marketer, the more subject to fraud they are’: Why advertiser complicity and complacency could be masking ad fraud’s true extent

Ad fraud is “the ultimate white collar crime” and is woefully underestimated and reported, according to NY-based digital marketer Augustine Fou. He thinks it could be more lucrative for criminals than even the international drugs racket: There is no product to move, hardly any risk of getting caught, and little punishment for the few that do. Yet marketers don’t seem to care. As advertiser peak bodies like the ANA prepare to dive back in to supply chain transparency, Fou suggests they will again get nowhere because they are asking the wrong questions. Likewise he says by focusing primarily on invalid traffic, verification firms are looking in the wrong places, cuckolding marketers as a result. Fou advises marketers to emulate the likes of P&G, Uber and Airbnb: Pause digital spending and measure not “vanity metrics”, but business impacts – if any.

‘The larger the marketer, the more subject to fraud they are’: Why advertiser complicity and complacency could be masking ad fraud’s true extent

Ad fraud is “the ultimate white collar crime” and is woefully underestimated and reported, according to NY-based digital marketer Augustine Fou. He thinks it could be more lucrative for criminals than even the international drugs racket: There is no product to move, hardly any risk of getting caught, and little punishment for the few that do. Yet marketers don’t seem to care. As advertiser peak bodies like the ANA prepare to dive back in to supply chain transparency, Fou suggests they will again get nowhere because they are asking the wrong questions. Likewise he says by focusing primarily on invalid traffic, verification firms are looking in the wrong places, cuckolding marketers as a result. Fou advises marketers to emulate the likes of P&G, Uber and Airbnb: Pause digital spending and measure not “vanity metrics”, but business impacts – if any.

55:00

EP121 - S1

10 May 21

RyanCap’s Simon Ryan reveals his grand 2025 plan for a digital transformation consulting, media, tech, and data powerhouse

By 2025 former Denstu ANZ CEO Simon Ryan figures two communications holding companies will be gone from the Australian market, a huge shift to “brand commerce” will be well underway - where every brand engagement with a consumer carries an opportunity to buy - and RyanCap will be aligned with either a private equity play, a public listing or another strategic equity partner. “We’ve got to be sensible and focus on what clients need and want,” he says. “Some local and international companies won’t survive the next two years.” 

RyanCap’s Simon Ryan reveals his grand 2025 plan for a digital transformation consulting, media, tech, and data powerhouse

By 2025 former Denstu ANZ CEO Simon Ryan figures two communications holding companies will be gone from the Australian market, a huge shift to “brand commerce” will be well underway - where every brand engagement with a consumer carries an opportunity to buy - and RyanCap will be aligned with either a private equity play, a public listing or another strategic equity partner. “We’ve got to be sensible and focus on what clients need and want,” he says. “Some local and international companies won’t survive the next two years.” 

48:45

EP120 - S1

6 May 21

Indie media: Advertising scale and consolidation at odds with fracturing but highly engaged audiences - who loses?

The mega industry trend for consolidation, scale and efficiency in the $15bn Australian ad market is counter to consumers driving to niche and narrow content. Starcom CEO Nick Keenan dukes it out with three young indie media groups - backed by high-profile investors making headway in a tough market.   

Indie media: Advertising scale and consolidation at odds with fracturing but highly engaged audiences - who loses?

The mega industry trend for consolidation, scale and efficiency in the $15bn Australian ad market is counter to consumers driving to niche and narrow content. Starcom CEO Nick Keenan dukes it out with three young indie media groups - backed by high-profile investors making headway in a tough market.   

50:04

EP119 - S1

3 May 21

‘Purpose’ is polarising: Volvo unpacks killing its fossil fuel cars by 2030; The Guardian banks on ad growth targeting progressive readers; former Danone-Kraft CEO, global B Corp Ambassador Lorna Davis “staggered” by out of touch brands, marketers

Volvo is out of petrol and oil engines and about to launch vegan leather; The Guardian is banking on progressive-leaning audiences for ad growth from purpose-led brands and former Danone China and US CEO Lorna Davis predicts 50% of Big Four audit firm revenues will be from Environment and Social Governance (ESG) compliance. Here’s the fast update on brands and purpose.      

‘Purpose’ is polarising: Volvo unpacks killing its fossil fuel cars by 2030; The Guardian banks on ad growth targeting progressive readers; former Danone-Kraft CEO, global B Corp Ambassador Lorna Davis “staggered” by out of touch brands, marketers

Volvo is out of petrol and oil engines and about to launch vegan leather; The Guardian is banking on progressive-leaning audiences for ad growth from purpose-led brands and former Danone China and US CEO Lorna Davis predicts 50% of Big Four audit firm revenues will be from Environment and Social Governance (ESG) compliance. Here’s the fast update on brands and purpose.      

41:50

EP118 - S1

26 Apr 21

‘Agencies are not banks’ warns Initiative global Chair Mat Baxter as Westpac, Arnott’s marketers link pitch problems to unclear tender briefs and process; poor engagement with procurement

“Ditch the pitch” protagonist Mat Baxter has warned agency reviews are getting worse globally, citing P&G’s extended media payment terms as a case in point. Many companies, though, “abuse the pitch process” he says. Baxter’s comments come as Australia’s peak advertiser and media agency industry bodies roll-out of a “world first” initiative to create industry-endorsed agency tender and pitching guidelines - dubbed “Project Baxter”. Arnott’s CMO Jenni Dill, Westpac’s Head of Group Brand, Advertising and Media Jenny Melhuish, non executive director and MFA board member Megan Brownlow and Mediabrands' CEO Mark Coad talk frankly about the fix - essentially, it’s on marketers to clean it up.

‘Agencies are not banks’ warns Initiative global Chair Mat Baxter as Westpac, Arnott’s marketers link pitch problems to unclear tender briefs and process; poor engagement with procurement

“Ditch the pitch” protagonist Mat Baxter has warned agency reviews are getting worse globally, citing P&G’s extended media payment terms as a case in point. Many companies, though, “abuse the pitch process” he says. Baxter’s comments come as Australia’s peak advertiser and media agency industry bodies roll-out of a “world first” initiative to create industry-endorsed agency tender and pitching guidelines - dubbed “Project Baxter”. Arnott’s CMO Jenni Dill, Westpac’s Head of Group Brand, Advertising and Media Jenny Melhuish, non executive director and MFA board member Megan Brownlow and Mediabrands' CEO Mark Coad talk frankly about the fix - essentially, it’s on marketers to clean it up.

40:32

EP117 - S1

19 Apr 21

Digital audio replicating BVOD’s early J-curve surge - audiences and revenues double

Here comes digital audio’s revenue J-curve. Just as BVOD for TV networks created new possibilities for advertisers in targeting and tracking compared to broadcast, local and national advertisers are awakening to the top, mid and lower marketing funnel options that a booming digital audio advertising market  is spawning - now upwards of 5 million users. Dozens of advertisers are piling in each week with campaigns using new audio advertising options from “shake-your-phone” response ads, location-based messages and even automated audio ads carrying tailored messages based on user locations. The rich data available via digital audio consumption is also being used to inform and deliver brand campaigns.      

Digital audio replicating BVOD’s early J-curve surge - audiences and revenues double

Here comes digital audio’s revenue J-curve. Just as BVOD for TV networks created new possibilities for advertisers in targeting and tracking compared to broadcast, local and national advertisers are awakening to the top, mid and lower marketing funnel options that a booming digital audio advertising market  is spawning - now upwards of 5 million users. Dozens of advertisers are piling in each week with campaigns using new audio advertising options from “shake-your-phone” response ads, location-based messages and even automated audio ads carrying tailored messages based on user locations. The rich data available via digital audio consumption is also being used to inform and deliver brand campaigns.      

41:08

EP116 - S1

15 Apr 21

The CMO Couch - marketers as consumers: Suncorp’s Mim Haysom, Australia Post’s Amber Collins on their personal media diet, preferred brands, favourite products and best customer experiences

Ask Amber Collins or Mim Haysom to name the best new product or service that’s won them over as a customer or consumer - not a marketer - and it’s podcasts. Ask Mim Haysom about loyalty programs and she admits she’s “a marketer’s worst nightmare”. Meanwhile Amber Collins' favourite  brands include Cotton On, Kmart and Chemist Warehouse, thanks to teenagers. What do marketers choose and buy as consumers and why? It’s all here in our CMO Couch series - Part One. 

The CMO Couch - marketers as consumers: Suncorp’s Mim Haysom, Australia Post’s Amber Collins on their personal media diet, preferred brands, favourite products and best customer experiences

Ask Amber Collins or Mim Haysom to name the best new product or service that’s won them over as a customer or consumer - not a marketer - and it’s podcasts. Ask Mim Haysom about loyalty programs and she admits she’s “a marketer’s worst nightmare”. Meanwhile Amber Collins' favourite  brands include Cotton On, Kmart and Chemist Warehouse, thanks to teenagers. What do marketers choose and buy as consumers and why? It’s all here in our CMO Couch series - Part One. 

22:43

EP115 - S1

13 Apr 21

Mecca Brands founder Jo Horgan on why customer experience triggered an in-store Covid boom, dropping an anti-advertising policy and her sweeping brief to Salesforce to reinvent online and offline beauty retailing

Jo Horgan, co-founder of the 100-store and online beauty juggernaut Mecca Brands opened her flagship store - and the biggest beauty retail space in the Southern Hemisphere - last November in the iconic Sydney CBD Gowings building when Covid was in full swing and CBDs were shopping wastelands. But custom is booming at pre-Covid levels and bricks and mortar is powering. Here’s how the beauty boss wants technology to reinvent the online-offline beauty game. But it’s still all about Mecca’s humans.

Mecca Brands founder Jo Horgan on why customer experience triggered an in-store Covid boom, dropping an anti-advertising policy and her sweeping brief to Salesforce to reinvent online and offline beauty retailing

Jo Horgan, co-founder of the 100-store and online beauty juggernaut Mecca Brands opened her flagship store - and the biggest beauty retail space in the Southern Hemisphere - last November in the iconic Sydney CBD Gowings building when Covid was in full swing and CBDs were shopping wastelands. But custom is booming at pre-Covid levels and bricks and mortar is powering. Here’s how the beauty boss wants technology to reinvent the online-offline beauty game. But it’s still all about Mecca’s humans.

42:18

EP114 - S1

22 Mar 21

'It’s going to get really complicated': Marketers at The Iconic, Tourism Australia, ADMA reveal their strategies for Google’s great cookie cull

The Iconic’s CMO Alexander Meyer says the digital commerce pureplay realised two years ago its heavy reliance on two platforms - Google and Facebook - was high-risk and needed a fix. Tourism Australia’s head of digital strategy and transformation, Paul Bailey says huge learnings for Australian marketers can already be found in China for a post-cookie world and ADMA’s regulatory and advocacy lead, Sarla Fernando says the great cookie kill has delivered a lightning strike for ADMA members to understand even bigger complexity and change beyond cookies is coming from sweeping regulatory change to privacy, data and personalisation. Buckle up - this one is important. 

'It’s going to get really complicated': Marketers at The Iconic, Tourism Australia, ADMA reveal their strategies for Google’s great cookie cull

The Iconic’s CMO Alexander Meyer says the digital commerce pureplay realised two years ago its heavy reliance on two platforms - Google and Facebook - was high-risk and needed a fix. Tourism Australia’s head of digital strategy and transformation, Paul Bailey says huge learnings for Australian marketers can already be found in China for a post-cookie world and ADMA’s regulatory and advocacy lead, Sarla Fernando says the great cookie kill has delivered a lightning strike for ADMA members to understand even bigger complexity and change beyond cookies is coming from sweeping regulatory change to privacy, data and personalisation. Buckle up - this one is important. 

49:00

EP113 - S1

16 Mar 21

Monash Marketing Professor: Don’t drink with Mark Ritson; don’t assume Google Search rules short-term ROI

A huge econometrics study of 60 Australian brands with $23bn in sales and $400m in media spend across GroupM’s portfolio has surprised even the heavy-hitting Marketing and Econometrics Professor at Monash University, Peter Danaher. TV advertising is renowned for driving long-term demand but Professor Danaher says an econometrics study commissioned by ThinkTV across 10 sectors – including auto, retail and banking – has challenged conventional assumptions on which media channels drive the best short-term results. TV, he says, is a runaway leader in driving incremental short-term sales volume and is “fundamental to sales demand derived from Search.” This podcast is for the sceptics. Professor Danaher clinically breaks it down. Listen-up.  

Monash Marketing Professor: Don’t drink with Mark Ritson; don’t assume Google Search rules short-term ROI

A huge econometrics study of 60 Australian brands with $23bn in sales and $400m in media spend across GroupM’s portfolio has surprised even the heavy-hitting Marketing and Econometrics Professor at Monash University, Peter Danaher. TV advertising is renowned for driving long-term demand but Professor Danaher says an econometrics study commissioned by ThinkTV across 10 sectors – including auto, retail and banking – has challenged conventional assumptions on which media channels drive the best short-term results. TV, he says, is a runaway leader in driving incremental short-term sales volume and is “fundamental to sales demand derived from Search.” This podcast is for the sceptics. Professor Danaher clinically breaks it down. Listen-up.  

28:03

EP112 - S1

11 Mar 21

Attention economy surges; Facebook to create ad formats which last longer with users than two seconds

An international beta trial which benchmarks consumer attention across different media channels and screen types from Australia’s Professor Karen Nelson-Field has seen dozens of media agency networks, media owners and advertisers around the world sign up. Perhaps the biggest sign though that change is coming fast is from the UK where Facebook has all but said it now acknowledges the need for longer attention spans and advertising exposure to build brand. Here’s the update to stay with global developments.

Attention economy surges; Facebook to create ad formats which last longer with users than two seconds

An international beta trial which benchmarks consumer attention across different media channels and screen types from Australia’s Professor Karen Nelson-Field has seen dozens of media agency networks, media owners and advertisers around the world sign up. Perhaps the biggest sign though that change is coming fast is from the UK where Facebook has all but said it now acknowledges the need for longer attention spans and advertising exposure to build brand. Here’s the update to stay with global developments.

22:53

EP111 - S1

8 Mar 21

‘Shortcast’ 10-minute podcasts set to surge as tipping point for digital audio over radio 18 months off; SCA bets future on one-stop LiSTNR platform

SCA CEO Grant Blackley says Silicon Valley tech players are raving about the company’s just launched LiSTNR platform as “world-beating” - it bundles broadcast radio brands and content with livestreaming, podcasts and new music formats in a personalised, logged-in user experience. Blackley, SCA’s Chief Content Officer Dave Cameron, and Digital Audio GM, Grant Tothill predict LiSTNR will propel audience discovery of more audio genres and formats to new highs as the market doubles by 2024.  

‘Shortcast’ 10-minute podcasts set to surge as tipping point for digital audio over radio 18 months off; SCA bets future on one-stop LiSTNR platform

SCA CEO Grant Blackley says Silicon Valley tech players are raving about the company’s just launched LiSTNR platform as “world-beating” - it bundles broadcast radio brands and content with livestreaming, podcasts and new music formats in a personalised, logged-in user experience. Blackley, SCA’s Chief Content Officer Dave Cameron, and Digital Audio GM, Grant Tothill predict LiSTNR will propel audience discovery of more audio genres and formats to new highs as the market doubles by 2024.  

36:57

EP110 - S1

4 Mar 21

JB Hi-Fi’s ex-CMO on why he replicated a 'NEO’ consumer strategy at Jaggad as the missing link for segmentation and growth

The default position for many companies in an economic downturn is to play the discounting and fire sale card - or to deploy more performance based marketing and messaging tactics. But as this panel of social scientists, marketers and ad agency bosses discuss, there’s a lucrative segment of the population that are high-discretionary spenders called NEOs who don’t behave or buy like traditional consumers and have already triggered the start of a two-speed economic recovery. Jaggad’s Chief Customer Officer and former JB Hi-Fi CMO Scott Browning is joined by the Centre for Social Economics' Ross Honeywill, Jonathan Coles at Premium and 303MullenLowe CEO Nick Cleaver.    

JB Hi-Fi’s ex-CMO on why he replicated a 'NEO’ consumer strategy at Jaggad as the missing link for segmentation and growth

The default position for many companies in an economic downturn is to play the discounting and fire sale card - or to deploy more performance based marketing and messaging tactics. But as this panel of social scientists, marketers and ad agency bosses discuss, there’s a lucrative segment of the population that are high-discretionary spenders called NEOs who don’t behave or buy like traditional consumers and have already triggered the start of a two-speed economic recovery. Jaggad’s Chief Customer Officer and former JB Hi-Fi CMO Scott Browning is joined by the Centre for Social Economics' Ross Honeywill, Jonathan Coles at Premium and 303MullenLowe CEO Nick Cleaver.    

43:58

EP109 - S1

1 Mar 21

Overlooked: Here's the “big six" ACCC proposals which could change digital advertising, data and targeting as we know it - but no-one’s talking about them

The stoush between Big Tech and Big Media over content payments has relegated another ACCC inquiry into media agencies and adtech to an industry wasteland. But by August, the ACCC will make final its recommendations to the Federal  Government and could upturn much of the data and advertising supply chain. Five leading Australian and international industry execs break down why the ACCC’s “big six” proposals matter and what it means for advertisers, tech, media and agencies.  

Overlooked: Here's the “big six" ACCC proposals which could change digital advertising, data and targeting as we know it - but no-one’s talking about them

The stoush between Big Tech and Big Media over content payments has relegated another ACCC inquiry into media agencies and adtech to an industry wasteland. But by August, the ACCC will make final its recommendations to the Federal  Government and could upturn much of the data and advertising supply chain. Five leading Australian and international industry execs break down why the ACCC’s “big six” proposals matter and what it means for advertisers, tech, media and agencies.  

45:52

EP108 - S1

22 Feb 21

ACCC Series - Part One: Everything you need to know about the ACCC inquiry into ad agencies and ad tech but can’t be bothered reading

In this two-part series, a stellar panel of international and Australian industry leaders break down the ACCC’s Digital Advertising Services Inquiry. Although sidelined by the clash between Big Tech and Big Media over the media bargaining code, the ACCC’s “other” inquiry is loaded with potentially industry-bending implications for marketing, brands, media, tech and agencies on data, privacy and how the industry targets customers and prospects. Everything you need to know is in these two episodes.      

ACCC Series - Part One: Everything you need to know about the ACCC inquiry into ad agencies and ad tech but can’t be bothered reading

In this two-part series, a stellar panel of international and Australian industry leaders break down the ACCC’s Digital Advertising Services Inquiry. Although sidelined by the clash between Big Tech and Big Media over the media bargaining code, the ACCC’s “other” inquiry is loaded with potentially industry-bending implications for marketing, brands, media, tech and agencies on data, privacy and how the industry targets customers and prospects. Everything you need to know is in these two episodes.      

30:33

EP107 - S1

15 Feb 21

Oz ‘ripe for more in-housing’: Why Betfair marketing boss is a fan as WPP, DDB see mixed results

There's talk another wave of in-housing looms as brands seek post-Covid savings and face a “marketing content crisis". Proponents argue efficiencies will bankroll smarter digital IP inside brands - and better creative, funding agencies to do what they do best and leaving the grunt to in-house teams. Others are unconvinced that in-housing will save the "content crisis". 

Oz ‘ripe for more in-housing’: Why Betfair marketing boss is a fan as WPP, DDB see mixed results

There's talk another wave of in-housing looms as brands seek post-Covid savings and face a “marketing content crisis". Proponents argue efficiencies will bankroll smarter digital IP inside brands - and better creative, funding agencies to do what they do best and leaving the grunt to in-house teams. Others are unconvinced that in-housing will save the "content crisis". 

51:46

EP106 - S1

8 Feb 21

Hoyts, TEG CEOs Damian Keogh and Geoff Jones eye recovery for movies, music, events

The Australian Box Office was off 67% last year; live events and concerts smashed revenues for Ticketek parent TEG by 97% early in Covid. But now both company bosses are pinning their hopes on some huge content initiatives in the second half - consumer desire to get out is the least of their worries, they say. Hoyts is even looking to diversify beyond movies as film studios flirt with shortening or pulling exclusive theatre distribution windows.  

Hoyts, TEG CEOs Damian Keogh and Geoff Jones eye recovery for movies, music, events

The Australian Box Office was off 67% last year; live events and concerts smashed revenues for Ticketek parent TEG by 97% early in Covid. But now both company bosses are pinning their hopes on some huge content initiatives in the second half - consumer desire to get out is the least of their worries, they say. Hoyts is even looking to diversify beyond movies as film studios flirt with shortening or pulling exclusive theatre distribution windows.  

24:51

EP105 - S1

1 Feb 21

Commoditisation and ‘dark kitchens': Why Menulog CMO Simon Cheng says building brands in social channels is too hard and worries industry is stuck on ‘creative mediocrity’

Menulog is 13 years old and after a competitive onslaught is now outgrowing UberEats and Deliveroo. For a digital pureplay business, CMO Simon Cheng is doing old-world crazy stuff like investing heavily in mass market media, using scorned ‘reach and frequency’ techniques and is a huge advocate for winning the 'mental availability’ battle as food ordering aggregators face commoditisation - and then there’s the future of 'Dark Kitchens'. 

Commoditisation and ‘dark kitchens': Why Menulog CMO Simon Cheng says building brands in social channels is too hard and worries industry is stuck on ‘creative mediocrity’

Menulog is 13 years old and after a competitive onslaught is now outgrowing UberEats and Deliveroo. For a digital pureplay business, CMO Simon Cheng is doing old-world crazy stuff like investing heavily in mass market media, using scorned ‘reach and frequency’ techniques and is a huge advocate for winning the 'mental availability’ battle as food ordering aggregators face commoditisation - and then there’s the future of 'Dark Kitchens'. 

40:53

EP104 - S1

26 Jan 21

The Feds are reviewing Australia’s Privacy Act - here’s what it means for marketing and media in 2021

If you have anything to do with first party data, personalisation, audience and customer segmentation or targeting, your number is up. The Federal Government in October released an issues paper on overhauling the current Privacy Act. In this podcast we teamed up with the IAB to hear from three privacy specialists on their Privacy Heaven and Hell scenarios for next year and a Q&A session with the panelists and Mi3’s Executive Editor, Paul McIntyre.   

The Feds are reviewing Australia’s Privacy Act - here’s what it means for marketing and media in 2021

If you have anything to do with first party data, personalisation, audience and customer segmentation or targeting, your number is up. The Federal Government in October released an issues paper on overhauling the current Privacy Act. In this podcast we teamed up with the IAB to hear from three privacy specialists on their Privacy Heaven and Hell scenarios for next year and a Q&A session with the panelists and Mi3’s Executive Editor, Paul McIntyre.   

54:40

EP103 - S1

7 Dec 20

Marketing Maths v Tech and Code 101: The marketing industry not so confident on its numbers - here’s a way out

Know how to crunch the numbers on Negative Binomial Distribution? How about Excess Share of Voice (ESOV), a P&L or cashflow? A new study of Australian marketers and agencies shows most are not so confident on any of the important maths to stay with the finance team, the CEO and boards. Brand Traction’s Jon Bradshaw and VMLY&R’s Chief Strategy Officer Ali Tilling break down a new industry study on how marketers and agencies rate themselves and where the gaps are. Their message? Start learning to count.  

Marketing Maths v Tech and Code 101: The marketing industry not so confident on its numbers - here’s a way out

Know how to crunch the numbers on Negative Binomial Distribution? How about Excess Share of Voice (ESOV), a P&L or cashflow? A new study of Australian marketers and agencies shows most are not so confident on any of the important maths to stay with the finance team, the CEO and boards. Brand Traction’s Jon Bradshaw and VMLY&R’s Chief Strategy Officer Ali Tilling break down a new industry study on how marketers and agencies rate themselves and where the gaps are. Their message? Start learning to count.  

27:32

EP102 - S1

30 Nov 20

How fake ads on social media and TV could help shape the future of cross channel media strategies and measurement

Australia is about to embark on a world first cross media measurement experiment that owes at least some of its DNA to fake ads created by Disney and run across its TV network and on social media. The Premium Content Alliance hopes it will help marketers truly understand how every channel impacts another – and prove that quality always delivers more powerful results. 

How fake ads on social media and TV could help shape the future of cross channel media strategies and measurement

Australia is about to embark on a world first cross media measurement experiment that owes at least some of its DNA to fake ads created by Disney and run across its TV network and on social media. The Premium Content Alliance hopes it will help marketers truly understand how every channel impacts another – and prove that quality always delivers more powerful results. 

30:49

EP101 - S1

26 Nov 20

Capgemini eyes Accenture Interactive, Deloitte Digital and agency turf with Australia’s $93m RXP takeover

The global communications holding companies have missed a prime opportunity to fast-track their digital transformation and tech credentials - instead, the French IT and consulting giant Capgemini is heading their way like Accenture Interactive and Deloitte Digital have already. RXP owns data, design and brand agency The Works, which it paid $33m for in 2018 to augment its capabilities in CX, digital transformation and the Salesforce, Microsoft and ServiceNow platforms. Capgemini CEO Olaf Pietschner and RXP CEO Ross Fielding talk what’s next after the merger. 

Capgemini eyes Accenture Interactive, Deloitte Digital and agency turf with Australia’s $93m RXP takeover

The global communications holding companies have missed a prime opportunity to fast-track their digital transformation and tech credentials - instead, the French IT and consulting giant Capgemini is heading their way like Accenture Interactive and Deloitte Digital have already. RXP owns data, design and brand agency The Works, which it paid $33m for in 2018 to augment its capabilities in CX, digital transformation and the Salesforce, Microsoft and ServiceNow platforms. Capgemini CEO Olaf Pietschner and RXP CEO Ross Fielding talk what’s next after the merger. 

44:29

EP100 - S1

23 Nov 20

Screen fatigue, surging brain chemicals, meaningful ads and why a more physical return to workplaces is inevitable

We know screen fatigue is real through Covid but a neuroscientist, a social researcher and OMA CEO Charmaine Moldrich say they’re having more impact than we think on people, community, industry and “purposeful” ads. Dr Fiona Kerr and Dynata regional director Marcus Pritchard join Moldrich on the case for more physical workplace interaction and why consumers might be headed for more conservatism.  

Screen fatigue, surging brain chemicals, meaningful ads and why a more physical return to workplaces is inevitable

We know screen fatigue is real through Covid but a neuroscientist, a social researcher and OMA CEO Charmaine Moldrich say they’re having more impact than we think on people, community, industry and “purposeful” ads. Dr Fiona Kerr and Dynata regional director Marcus Pritchard join Moldrich on the case for more physical workplace interaction and why consumers might be headed for more conservatism.  

45:54

EP99 - S1

19 Nov 20

Is the "connected customer" boom delivering growth? CMOs, data and innovation leads at Budget Direct, First State-Aware Super, NRMA and Lavender CX reveal the trials and tribulations

Budget Direct is the fastest growing insurer in Australia - is it product, customer experience or marketing and comms that’s driving the growth? CMO Jonathan Kerr unpacks the answer and lobs a jibe at “transformation programs” - Budget Direct has never done one. Kerr is joined by the Head of Innovation at the rebranded Aware Super, Anita Ayres, NRMA’s Digital and Data lead Harris Hutkin and Lavender CX’s Damian Sharpley who get real on the customer roadmap.

Is the "connected customer" boom delivering growth? CMOs, data and innovation leads at Budget Direct, First State-Aware Super, NRMA and Lavender CX reveal the trials and tribulations

Budget Direct is the fastest growing insurer in Australia - is it product, customer experience or marketing and comms that’s driving the growth? CMO Jonathan Kerr unpacks the answer and lobs a jibe at “transformation programs” - Budget Direct has never done one. Kerr is joined by the Head of Innovation at the rebranded Aware Super, Anita Ayres, NRMA’s Digital and Data lead Harris Hutkin and Lavender CX’s Damian Sharpley who get real on the customer roadmap.

46:14

EP98 - S1

16 Nov 20

Brands and media agencies, don’t miss this podcast if you plan on staying with global developments in the emerging attention economy and what impact it’s having on traditional audience and reach metrics

Marketers and agencies are missing huge opportunities by only superficially measuring attention. But that’s about to change. A new platform and metric, attentionTRACE, is about to go live. AttentionTRACE measures attention across channels, but Story54’s Jane Waterhouse argues even before the trial data is out, one medium in particular lands messages more deeply, at least in women’s minds, than any other. Amplified Intelligence CEO, Professor Karen Nelson-Field, and UK Neuro Science CEO, Shazia Ginai explain the science. Pay attention -  you’ll need to know this stuff.

Brands and media agencies, don’t miss this podcast if you plan on staying with global developments in the emerging attention economy and what impact it’s having on traditional audience and reach metrics

Marketers and agencies are missing huge opportunities by only superficially measuring attention. But that’s about to change. A new platform and metric, attentionTRACE, is about to go live. AttentionTRACE measures attention across channels, but Story54’s Jane Waterhouse argues even before the trial data is out, one medium in particular lands messages more deeply, at least in women’s minds, than any other. Amplified Intelligence CEO, Professor Karen Nelson-Field, and UK Neuro Science CEO, Shazia Ginai explain the science. Pay attention -  you’ll need to know this stuff.

28:59

EP97 - S1

12 Nov 20

Smoke and fire: WPP AUNZ boss Jens Monsees rubbishes rebellion rumours as board instigates CEO review; counters Sir Martin Sorrell on S4 Capital's ’new model'

Jens Monsees is one year into running WPP’s AUNZ operation and the market is now rife with talk of broad internal leadership unrest with how he’s transforming the business. In this conversation, Monsees addresses talk of a fallout after the abrupt departure of COO John Steadman, a board-instigated review of his performance across staff and clients and he fires back at S4 Capital’s jibes around the troubled future of holding companies.

Smoke and fire: WPP AUNZ boss Jens Monsees rubbishes rebellion rumours as board instigates CEO review; counters Sir Martin Sorrell on S4 Capital's ’new model'

Jens Monsees is one year into running WPP’s AUNZ operation and the market is now rife with talk of broad internal leadership unrest with how he’s transforming the business. In this conversation, Monsees addresses talk of a fallout after the abrupt departure of COO John Steadman, a board-instigated review of his performance across staff and clients and he fires back at S4 Capital’s jibes around the troubled future of holding companies.

36:59

EP96 - S1

9 Nov 20

Commbank CMO Monique Macleod weighs in on the downside of short-term marketing and what she sees next for customer personalisation, AI, media and tech

Hot off the heels of overseeing a brand refresh for the Commonwealth Bank, CMO Monique Macleod talks the art and science of marketing, customer personalisation and how her team is structuring and adapting to AI and new tech stacks - and what it now means for media and team capabilities. "Your tech is never sorted,” she says.

Commbank CMO Monique Macleod weighs in on the downside of short-term marketing and what she sees next for customer personalisation, AI, media and tech

Hot off the heels of overseeing a brand refresh for the Commonwealth Bank, CMO Monique Macleod talks the art and science of marketing, customer personalisation and how her team is structuring and adapting to AI and new tech stacks - and what it now means for media and team capabilities. "Your tech is never sorted,” she says.

43:09

EP95 - S1

2 Nov 20

Penfolds v Louis Vuitton: Chief Winemaker and Global CMO reveal the bold three-year strategy to create a global Australian luxury icon - beyond a fine wine brand

Penfolds Chief Winemaker Peter Gago and global marketing boss Kristy Keyte talk through their ambitious strategy to reinvent Penfolds into an Australian global luxury icon, like Gucci, Aston Martin or Louis Vuitton. Joined by WundermunThompson CEO, Lee Leggett, this conversation is fascinating, including how Penfolds sold-out of the $200,000 release of its Ampoule edition and how they’re managing strategy, product and portfolio management, consumer behaviour, shifting direct-to-consumer and e-commerce models, long-term branding and executional complexity.

Penfolds v Louis Vuitton: Chief Winemaker and Global CMO reveal the bold three-year strategy to create a global Australian luxury icon - beyond a fine wine brand

Penfolds Chief Winemaker Peter Gago and global marketing boss Kristy Keyte talk through their ambitious strategy to reinvent Penfolds into an Australian global luxury icon, like Gucci, Aston Martin or Louis Vuitton. Joined by WundermunThompson CEO, Lee Leggett, this conversation is fascinating, including how Penfolds sold-out of the $200,000 release of its Ampoule edition and how they’re managing strategy, product and portfolio management, consumer behaviour, shifting direct-to-consumer and e-commerce models, long-term branding and executional complexity.

39:32

EP94 - S1

26 Oct 20

ViacomCBS Market Voice: Other TV networks should be ‘terrified’ - top Australian ViacomCBS execs say the megamerger and new content and streaming assets of Network’s 10’s new US parent company will rattle local rivals

In this Market Voice podcast, ViacomCBS chief content and sales officers Beverley McGarvey and Rod Prosser lay out the streaming, content and commercial plans for the Australian group - including the launch of the new Paramount+ service and when the biggest ad-supported digital TV service in the US, Pluto TV, will arrive Down Under. Prosser also suggests advertisers frustrated by the “mess” over cricket rights may have found a silver lining.

ViacomCBS Market Voice: Other TV networks should be ‘terrified’ - top Australian ViacomCBS execs say the megamerger and new content and streaming assets of Network’s 10’s new US parent company will rattle local rivals

In this Market Voice podcast, ViacomCBS chief content and sales officers Beverley McGarvey and Rod Prosser lay out the streaming, content and commercial plans for the Australian group - including the launch of the new Paramount+ service and when the biggest ad-supported digital TV service in the US, Pluto TV, will arrive Down Under. Prosser also suggests advertisers frustrated by the “mess” over cricket rights may have found a silver lining.

23:43

EP93 - S1

22 Oct 20

Australian marketers are flocking to applied Behavioural Economics - Simply Energy marketing and sales boss Andrea Bernard and Hardhat’s Dan Monheit explain how - and why - it’s on-trend this year

Andrea Bernard, the head of marketing and sales at Simply Energy, ultimately part of the $60bn French energy giant, Energie, started using Behavioural Economics thinking 18 months ago - now it’s central to her strategy on everything. And Andrea isn’t alone. Behavioural Economics specialist and co-founder of Hard Hat, Dan Monheit, says there’s been a surge of interest from brands this year. Here’s why. 

Australian marketers are flocking to applied Behavioural Economics - Simply Energy marketing and sales boss Andrea Bernard and Hardhat’s Dan Monheit explain how - and why - it’s on-trend this year

Andrea Bernard, the head of marketing and sales at Simply Energy, ultimately part of the $60bn French energy giant, Energie, started using Behavioural Economics thinking 18 months ago - now it’s central to her strategy on everything. And Andrea isn’t alone. Behavioural Economics specialist and co-founder of Hard Hat, Dan Monheit, says there’s been a surge of interest from brands this year. Here’s why. 

20:40

EP92 - S1

19 Oct 20

IPG Mediabrands exec: If regulators don’t get to grips with data, we will all end up working for Facebook and Google

Australian Joshua Lowcock is Chief Digital and Innovation Officer at UM in the US and UM’s global Brand Safety Officer. Based in New York, he’s spearheaded development of a Media Responsibility Audit of social media platforms alongside initiatives to try to make businesses see the billions they spend on advertising within the same frame as corporate social responsibility – and says it’s gaining traction “faster than even I imagined”. Now regulators need to quickly deal with data monopolies without getting distracted by sideshows. If they don't, Lowcock fears we may all soon be working for the tech platforms - because nobody else can compete.

IPG Mediabrands exec: If regulators don’t get to grips with data, we will all end up working for Facebook and Google

Australian Joshua Lowcock is Chief Digital and Innovation Officer at UM in the US and UM’s global Brand Safety Officer. Based in New York, he’s spearheaded development of a Media Responsibility Audit of social media platforms alongside initiatives to try to make businesses see the billions they spend on advertising within the same frame as corporate social responsibility – and says it’s gaining traction “faster than even I imagined”. Now regulators need to quickly deal with data monopolies without getting distracted by sideshows. If they don't, Lowcock fears we may all soon be working for the tech platforms - because nobody else can compete.

39:09

EP91 - S1

12 Oct 20

Ex-Woolworths, Myer, Quantium customer loyalty boss takes on Ehrenberg-Bass and explains why loyalty schemes need a reboot

Even the discount-averse Apple uses Bernard Wilson’s company to move product. The one-time investment banker - who was part of a consortium which made a failed hostile bid for Qantas - lead Woolworths’ first attempt at a loyalty program, which also didn’t work. The second version did. After stints at Myer and Quantium, the new CEO of cash-back trailblazer, Cashrewards, says as brands and companies chase the Covid-fuelled e-commerce surge, loyalty programs need a rebrand and retailers and marketers need a rethink on loyalty. Cashrewards customer base is up 40% this year and he’s about to go hard on building the brand, more customers and an IPO.

Ex-Woolworths, Myer, Quantium customer loyalty boss takes on Ehrenberg-Bass and explains why loyalty schemes need a reboot

Even the discount-averse Apple uses Bernard Wilson’s company to move product. The one-time investment banker - who was part of a consortium which made a failed hostile bid for Qantas - lead Woolworths’ first attempt at a loyalty program, which also didn’t work. The second version did. After stints at Myer and Quantium, the new CEO of cash-back trailblazer, Cashrewards, says as brands and companies chase the Covid-fuelled e-commerce surge, loyalty programs need a rebrand and retailers and marketers need a rethink on loyalty. Cashrewards customer base is up 40% this year and he’s about to go hard on building the brand, more customers and an IPO.

34:41

EP90 - S1

5 Oct 20

Content marketing overkill? Coles, IAG, Storyation on the COVID-induced surge in brands doing content and standing out through more noise

Bigger budgets are pouring into content marketing this year but IAG’s Director of Content & Customer Engagement, Zara Curtis, says there’s “a lot of bad content” being produced by brands. IAG is producing less but better quality. Curtis says she’s a “content killer” as IAG works out the art of what not to produce. Meanwhile, Coles’ Senior Content Manager Jill Tenner is doing much more in the past six months because of customer demand for inspiration. The key takeout, says Storyation’s Head of Content, Lauren Quaitance, is brands have been scrambling over the past five months to overhaul or develop new content marketing plans.

Content marketing overkill? Coles, IAG, Storyation on the COVID-induced surge in brands doing content and standing out through more noise

Bigger budgets are pouring into content marketing this year but IAG’s Director of Content & Customer Engagement, Zara Curtis, says there’s “a lot of bad content” being produced by brands. IAG is producing less but better quality. Curtis says she’s a “content killer” as IAG works out the art of what not to produce. Meanwhile, Coles’ Senior Content Manager Jill Tenner is doing much more in the past six months because of customer demand for inspiration. The key takeout, says Storyation’s Head of Content, Lauren Quaitance, is brands have been scrambling over the past five months to overhaul or develop new content marketing plans.

39:48

EP89 - S1

28 Sep 20

CommBank's analytics boss on how its AI-powered ‘customer engagement engine’ is changing everything

Commonwealth Bank Chief Analytics Officer Andrew McMullan studied machine learning, taught mathematics and is now leading the bank’s AI-fuelled customer strategy. The ‘math man’ and CMO Monique Macleod have been working hand in glove on what is next for Australia’s biggest bank.

CommBank's analytics boss on how its AI-powered ‘customer engagement engine’ is changing everything

Commonwealth Bank Chief Analytics Officer Andrew McMullan studied machine learning, taught mathematics and is now leading the bank’s AI-fuelled customer strategy. The ‘math man’ and CMO Monique Macleod have been working hand in glove on what is next for Australia’s biggest bank.

34:02

EP88 - S1

22 Sep 20

Russel Howcroft, Nine Radio boss Tom Malone on media the “most ruthless” sector in Howcroft’s career, the broadcaster's talent purge, advertiser age bias and leaving PwC

Howcroft says media is the most ruthless industry, consulting the most influential but advertising the smartest. Nine Radio’s new boss Tom Malone, meanwhile, spills the beans on how Russel Howcroft left PwC to join 3AW’s breakfast slot and the complete overhaul he’s implemented at Nine Radio to skew younger and address advertiser bias against older, lucrative audiences in radio. Malone also tells a very different story around Alan Jones and his exit from radio. 

Russel Howcroft, Nine Radio boss Tom Malone on media the “most ruthless” sector in Howcroft’s career, the broadcaster's talent purge, advertiser age bias and leaving PwC

Howcroft says media is the most ruthless industry, consulting the most influential but advertising the smartest. Nine Radio’s new boss Tom Malone, meanwhile, spills the beans on how Russel Howcroft left PwC to join 3AW’s breakfast slot and the complete overhaul he’s implemented at Nine Radio to skew younger and address advertiser bias against older, lucrative audiences in radio. Malone also tells a very different story around Alan Jones and his exit from radio. 

30:24

EP87 - S1

14 Sep 20

Former Foxtel, News Corp boss Peter Tonagh talks legacy media’s challenged future, why he’s still investing and the merits of “soft socialism” in business

Peter Tonagh knows a bit about the media sector and is part of an investment group piling into new media ventures. Big Media is consolidating while he argues future media is specialising and fragmenting. There is tension everywhere. 

Former Foxtel, News Corp boss Peter Tonagh talks legacy media’s challenged future, why he’s still investing and the merits of “soft socialism” in business

Peter Tonagh knows a bit about the media sector and is part of an investment group piling into new media ventures. Big Media is consolidating while he argues future media is specialising and fragmenting. There is tension everywhere. 

36:46

EP86 - S1

7 Sep 20

Why entertainment giant Vivendi wants more culture, less tech for its global agency division Havas and new Australian indie acquisition Hyland

French-owned Havas Media last week acquired Australian independent agency HYLAND with plans to plug into its vast parent company Vivendi, controlled by the French billionaire industrialist, Vincent Bollore. Vivendi owns music labels, Hollywood studios, TV networks and gaming and ticketing companies and is moving Havas to a very different position versus its bigger global marketing services rivals like WPP, Omnicom, IPG, Dentsu and Publicis. More culture, not just tech is the idea. Havas Media’s Australian team talk the HYLAND acquisition, Vivendi and a pick-up in media spending now underway for the December quarter.

Why entertainment giant Vivendi wants more culture, less tech for its global agency division Havas and new Australian indie acquisition Hyland

French-owned Havas Media last week acquired Australian independent agency HYLAND with plans to plug into its vast parent company Vivendi, controlled by the French billionaire industrialist, Vincent Bollore. Vivendi owns music labels, Hollywood studios, TV networks and gaming and ticketing companies and is moving Havas to a very different position versus its bigger global marketing services rivals like WPP, Omnicom, IPG, Dentsu and Publicis. More culture, not just tech is the idea. Havas Media’s Australian team talk the HYLAND acquisition, Vivendi and a pick-up in media spending now underway for the December quarter.

25:46

EP85 - S1

31 Aug 20

TV’s old guard or digital’s new blood? Nestle talks an ‘All Screens’ video and TV strategy in a power-packed roundtable on who wins on programmatic video v converged and connected TV planning, buying and measurement

Nestle’s Head of Media, Data and Content, Antonia Farqhuar is joined by UM’s Nicole Prior, Seven’s Kurt Burnette, Hearts & Science’s Issy Dunn and Amobee’s Liam Walsh in a robust discussion on a red hot industry theme...who emerges on top in a converged and connected TV world - digital video professionals or their broadcast TV peers? The playbook has started.

TV’s old guard or digital’s new blood? Nestle talks an ‘All Screens’ video and TV strategy in a power-packed roundtable on who wins on programmatic video v converged and connected TV planning, buying and measurement

Nestle’s Head of Media, Data and Content, Antonia Farqhuar is joined by UM’s Nicole Prior, Seven’s Kurt Burnette, Hearts & Science’s Issy Dunn and Amobee’s Liam Walsh in a robust discussion on a red hot industry theme...who emerges on top in a converged and connected TV world - digital video professionals or their broadcast TV peers? The playbook has started.

45:06

EP84 - S1

27 Aug 20

Deloitte overhauls marketing: Ex-WPP CEO, Network 10 brand boss Matt McGrath on his global CMO role; Rochelle Tognetti on being first female CMO for Australia

Australia's first female CMO is teaching meditation at the firm through COVID and pushed through a major Salesforce rollout internally in the past two months to "connect the data pipes" - Rochelle Tognetti joins Matt McGrath, the new Australian global CMO, on the radical shifts in B2B marketing, the end of physical events, virtual pitching, deploying AI marketing chat bots and what next for the global Deloitte brand. 

Deloitte overhauls marketing: Ex-WPP CEO, Network 10 brand boss Matt McGrath on his global CMO role; Rochelle Tognetti on being first female CMO for Australia

Australia's first female CMO is teaching meditation at the firm through COVID and pushed through a major Salesforce rollout internally in the past two months to "connect the data pipes" - Rochelle Tognetti joins Matt McGrath, the new Australian global CMO, on the radical shifts in B2B marketing, the end of physical events, virtual pitching, deploying AI marketing chat bots and what next for the global Deloitte brand. 

33:40

EP82 - S1

18 Aug 20

“The myth of rationality": Why Boeing’s return to supersonic travel, FedEx and investment bankers prove B2B (and B2C) marketers need to rethink behavioural economics and psychology

Behavioural science is the trojan horse marketers need to get psychology back into business and the boardroom. Rory Sutherland, vice chairman of Ogilvy UK and a founder of its behavioural science practice, suggests B2B marketers (and B2C marketers for that matter) must explode the myth that businesses and their people only make logical decisions, or they'll keep making the same mistakes until their tenure ends.

“The myth of rationality": Why Boeing’s return to supersonic travel, FedEx and investment bankers prove B2B (and B2C) marketers need to rethink behavioural economics and psychology

Behavioural science is the trojan horse marketers need to get psychology back into business and the boardroom. Rory Sutherland, vice chairman of Ogilvy UK and a founder of its behavioural science practice, suggests B2B marketers (and B2C marketers for that matter) must explode the myth that businesses and their people only make logical decisions, or they'll keep making the same mistakes until their tenure ends.

29:18

EP81 - S1

17 Aug 20

Follow the money: Nestle, AANA, MFA, OMD, Nine and The Guardian say marketers must step up on digital ad supply chain’s black hole

Nestle's head of eStrategy, Marketing and Brand, Martin Brown, says 50% of advertiser digital budgets going to working media is "not good enough" - 70% should be the baseline. With the competition regulator digging into the digital ad supply chain and PwC finding half of digital ad dollars are eaten up before they get to publishers, marketers must get a grip on where they are spending their money. Nestlé‘s Brown - also chair of the AANA - OMD‘s Aimee Buchanan, IAB chair and Pedestrian Group‘s Matt Rowley and Guardian Australia boss Dan Stinton debate transparency, remuneration, brand safety and suggest cutting out programmatic middlemen could be key.

Follow the money: Nestle, AANA, MFA, OMD, Nine and The Guardian say marketers must step up on digital ad supply chain’s black hole

Nestle's head of eStrategy, Marketing and Brand, Martin Brown, says 50% of advertiser digital budgets going to working media is "not good enough" - 70% should be the baseline. With the competition regulator digging into the digital ad supply chain and PwC finding half of digital ad dollars are eaten up before they get to publishers, marketers must get a grip on where they are spending their money. Nestlé‘s Brown - also chair of the AANA - OMD‘s Aimee Buchanan, IAB chair and Pedestrian Group‘s Matt Rowley and Guardian Australia boss Dan Stinton debate transparency, remuneration, brand safety and suggest cutting out programmatic middlemen could be key.

37:11

EP80 - S1

10 Aug 20

CEOs at world’s leading Out Of Home companies say the turnaround has started despite volatility; why WFH's a bubble and programmatic OOH to surge

They’ve arguably been the hardest hit media companies through COVID-19 but the bosses of some of the world’s leading OOH companies - with iconic sites like NY’s Times Square, London’s Piccadilly Circus and Sydney’s Glebe Island Silos in their portfolios - come out swinging on this Mi3 podcast. Existential threats from COVID-19 and changes to public mobility and WFH are overcooked, they claim. And they’ve learnt the lessons from publishing - programmatic trading is set to surge but not through intermediaries and open exchanges like Google's. They’re not so united, however, on industry-wide trading platforms to tackle Big Tech. Sound familiar? This one’s a cracker.

CEOs at world’s leading Out Of Home companies say the turnaround has started despite volatility; why WFH's a bubble and programmatic OOH to surge

They’ve arguably been the hardest hit media companies through COVID-19 but the bosses of some of the world’s leading OOH companies - with iconic sites like NY’s Times Square, London’s Piccadilly Circus and Sydney’s Glebe Island Silos in their portfolios - come out swinging on this Mi3 podcast. Existential threats from COVID-19 and changes to public mobility and WFH are overcooked, they claim. And they’ve learnt the lessons from publishing - programmatic trading is set to surge but not through intermediaries and open exchanges like Google's. They’re not so united, however, on industry-wide trading platforms to tackle Big Tech. Sound familiar? This one’s a cracker.

42:46

EP79 - S1

4 Aug 20

Data governance alert: Apple's September bombshell will hit ad market, user tracking - Adore Beauty joins a panel of adtech, martech and 'demand-gen' industry experts

A more privacy-aggressive Apple is again pressuring its big tech peers like Google and Facebook to play cleaner on gaining “informed consent” from users to be tracked. A September iOS mobile operating system update from Apple will bluntly force more disclosure on how users and their behaviour data is matched and traded across the open web, apps and minute-by-minute geo-location journeys and patterns - anything from work commutes and exercise routines to retail precincts. Industry insiders say Google will have to follow Apple to maintain regulatory optics, like it’s been forced to by Apple’s Safari browser in the pending 2022 Google Chrome “cookie apocalypse”. Complex consent and transparency headaches for brands and marketers are weeks away.   

Data governance alert: Apple's September bombshell will hit ad market, user tracking - Adore Beauty joins a panel of adtech, martech and 'demand-gen' industry experts

A more privacy-aggressive Apple is again pressuring its big tech peers like Google and Facebook to play cleaner on gaining “informed consent” from users to be tracked. A September iOS mobile operating system update from Apple will bluntly force more disclosure on how users and their behaviour data is matched and traded across the open web, apps and minute-by-minute geo-location journeys and patterns - anything from work commutes and exercise routines to retail precincts. Industry insiders say Google will have to follow Apple to maintain regulatory optics, like it’s been forced to by Apple’s Safari browser in the pending 2022 Google Chrome “cookie apocalypse”. Complex consent and transparency headaches for brands and marketers are weeks away.   

45:59

EP78 - S1

3 Aug 20

Famed ad agency network DDB’s week-old global CEO Marty O’Halloran is an Australian with grand plans to shake up the DDB world. Here’s how he’s going to do it

Within days of DDB Australia and New Zealand chairman and CEO Marty O’Halloran landing the global CEO role last week, he made a radical move to appoint a black, data-led CEO, Justin Thomas-Copeland, to the North American advertising institution. In this conversation, O’Halloran admits it’s a signal for the DDB world that he will shake things up. John Wren, the boss of DDB’s giant NY-listed parent company Omnicom, says if O’Halloran can replicate the performance of the Australian and New Zealand group internationally, they’re going to “have a great time together”. Here’s what the low-profile O'Halloran says he’s going to do.    

Famed ad agency network DDB’s week-old global CEO Marty O’Halloran is an Australian with grand plans to shake up the DDB world. Here’s how he’s going to do it

Within days of DDB Australia and New Zealand chairman and CEO Marty O’Halloran landing the global CEO role last week, he made a radical move to appoint a black, data-led CEO, Justin Thomas-Copeland, to the North American advertising institution. In this conversation, O’Halloran admits it’s a signal for the DDB world that he will shake things up. John Wren, the boss of DDB’s giant NY-listed parent company Omnicom, says if O’Halloran can replicate the performance of the Australian and New Zealand group internationally, they’re going to “have a great time together”. Here’s what the low-profile O'Halloran says he’s going to do.    

44:56

EP77 - S1

27 Jul 20

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