Huh Science Explained

Huh Science Explained

Put your thinking caps on, folks. Huh? Science Explained is here, the twice-weekly podcast brought to you by LiSTNR and Cosmos. Hosted by Cosmos’ very own science journos, this is the podcast that will answer all of life’s questions – in ju

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Season 1


How to perfectly enjoy a glass of champagne, according to science 🥂

As the silly season approaches, Cosmos journalist Ellen Phiddian spills the science on how to enjoy the perfect glass of bubbly, from the ideal glassware, exact temperature and achieving the perfect pop.

How to perfectly enjoy a glass of champagne, according to science 🥂

As the silly season approaches, Cosmos journalist Ellen Phiddian spills the science on how to enjoy the perfect glass of bubbly, from the ideal glassware, exact temperature and achieving the perfect pop.

08:16

EP44 - S1

4 Dec 22

Bees can tell the time and do maths (Yes, you read that right) 🐝

Unless you’re being actively stung by one, it’s not hard to love bees. They pollenate our food, do little waggle dances and give us honey. But they’re also incredibly helpful for science.  Jacinta Bowler, a science journalist at Cosmos, is looking into the weird (and cute) ways bees have ended up as scientist’s lab rats.

Bees can tell the time and do maths (Yes, you read that right) 🐝

Unless you’re being actively stung by one, it’s not hard to love bees. They pollenate our food, do little waggle dances and give us honey. But they’re also incredibly helpful for science.  Jacinta Bowler, a science journalist at Cosmos, is looking into the weird (and cute) ways bees have ended up as scientist’s lab rats.

09:04

EP43 - S1

1 Dec 22

When did the first animals walk on Earth?

Today we’ll be diving into Earth’s deep past to find out how and when the first animals left the primordial oceans to walk on land 🌏 Evrim Yazgin is a Cosmos journalist with a Masters in Physics from the University of Melbourne. His love of palaeontology has burned since he was three and, fun fact: his name means “evolution” in Turkish! The joys of being a biologist’s son.

When did the first animals walk on Earth?

Today we’ll be diving into Earth’s deep past to find out how and when the first animals left the primordial oceans to walk on land 🌏 Evrim Yazgin is a Cosmos journalist with a Masters in Physics from the University of Melbourne. His love of palaeontology has burned since he was three and, fun fact: his name means “evolution” in Turkish! The joys of being a biologist’s son.

07:58

EP42 - S1

27 Nov 22

The science of sunscreen ☀️🧴

A primer on why sunscreen is a medicine, what’s in it, and why it’s sticky, by ex-chemist and current solvent-enthusiast Ellen Phiddian. Ellen Phiddian is a science journalist at Cosmos. She has a BSc (Honours) in chemistry and science communication, and an MSc in science communication, both from the Australian National University.

The science of sunscreen ☀️🧴

A primer on why sunscreen is a medicine, what’s in it, and why it’s sticky, by ex-chemist and current solvent-enthusiast Ellen Phiddian. Ellen Phiddian is a science journalist at Cosmos. She has a BSc (Honours) in chemistry and science communication, and an MSc in science communication, both from the Australian National University.

09:03

EP41 - S1

24 Nov 22

Peeling back the science on bananas 🍌

Bananas are a beloved by a bunch of us the world over, but will they go extinct on us? Will eating too many kill you? And are banana peels really that slippery?  Imma Perfetto is a journalist at Cosmos Magazine and has an honours degree in Science Communication.

Peeling back the science on bananas 🍌

Bananas are a beloved by a bunch of us the world over, but will they go extinct on us? Will eating too many kill you? And are banana peels really that slippery?  Imma Perfetto is a journalist at Cosmos Magazine and has an honours degree in Science Communication.

09:50

EP40 - S1

20 Nov 22

Which bin should I put my coffee cup in?

This episode is looking into the surprisingly complex world of coffee cups. Are they recyclable? Is it better to just chuck them in the bin? Are bioplastics actually better for the planet? Jacinta Bowler, a science journalist at Cosmos, is your guide to the many questions surrounding those convenient little coffee carriers. 

Which bin should I put my coffee cup in?

This episode is looking into the surprisingly complex world of coffee cups. Are they recyclable? Is it better to just chuck them in the bin? Are bioplastics actually better for the planet? Jacinta Bowler, a science journalist at Cosmos, is your guide to the many questions surrounding those convenient little coffee carriers. 

08:28

EP39 - S1

17 Nov 22

Hay fever bad right now? It's actually your body trying to help you 🤧

Hay fever sufferers have been warned to brace themselves for a severe allergy season as the weather warms up. Join Cosmos Science journalist Matthew Agius to find out all you need to know about hay fever and what happens during an allergic response.

Hay fever bad right now? It's actually your body trying to help you 🤧

Hay fever sufferers have been warned to brace themselves for a severe allergy season as the weather warms up. Join Cosmos Science journalist Matthew Agius to find out all you need to know about hay fever and what happens during an allergic response.

09:16

EP38 - S1

13 Nov 22

School of (orbiting) Rock: The science of the moon

Lunar lunacy, celestial water, but not enough cheese! Our Moon is a magnet for stories – Join Matt Agius as he looks at the science behind the superstitions.

School of (orbiting) Rock: The science of the moon

Lunar lunacy, celestial water, but not enough cheese! Our Moon is a magnet for stories – Join Matt Agius as he looks at the science behind the superstitions.

10:28

EP37 - S1

10 Nov 22

⚡️Lightning – more than just a flashy science

Today we're focussing on lightning – what exactly is that flash, where does it happen, what are the odds of it hitting me and can we untangle the shocking myths from the dazzling truths? Clare Kenyon has her fingers in so many science pies, she’s running out of flavours. With a background in astrophysics and dabblings in maths, geology, music and criminology – just to name a few – she’s constantly distracted by the next new shiny thing – especially when it’s space-bound. An ex-high school teacher and Superstar of STEM, she’s particularly passionate about plain-speaking science and women in STEM.

⚡️Lightning – more than just a flashy science

Today we're focussing on lightning – what exactly is that flash, where does it happen, what are the odds of it hitting me and can we untangle the shocking myths from the dazzling truths? Clare Kenyon has her fingers in so many science pies, she’s running out of flavours. With a background in astrophysics and dabblings in maths, geology, music and criminology – just to name a few – she’s constantly distracted by the next new shiny thing – especially when it’s space-bound. An ex-high school teacher and Superstar of STEM, she’s particularly passionate about plain-speaking science and women in STEM.

08:53

EP36 - S1

6 Nov 22

Hot stuff and cool things: The physics of temperature

Today we will be wrapping our heads around the physics of temperature to work out why things get hot, and just how cold they can get.  Evrim Yazgin is a Cosmos journalist with a Masters in Physics from the University of Melbourne. His love of science fiction has spurred an interest in all things flux capacitor to quantum-time-antimatter-inverters.

Hot stuff and cool things: The physics of temperature

Today we will be wrapping our heads around the physics of temperature to work out why things get hot, and just how cold they can get.  Evrim Yazgin is a Cosmos journalist with a Masters in Physics from the University of Melbourne. His love of science fiction has spurred an interest in all things flux capacitor to quantum-time-antimatter-inverters.

07:10

EP35 - S1

3 Nov 22

Halloween: Black cats, sadism and the holiday's strange connection to Michelle Obama

Halloween is all about leaning into our fears and getting carried away with our superstitions. But is it possible to take things too far? Cosmos science journalist Petra Stock investigates the fallout from Halloween fun. Petra Stock has a Bachelor of Engineering and a Master of Journalism, both from the University of Melbourne. While she loves writing about new technologies (robots, digital platforms), Petra is nostalgic for the retro kind (letters, cassette tapes).

Halloween: Black cats, sadism and the holiday's strange connection to Michelle Obama

Halloween is all about leaning into our fears and getting carried away with our superstitions. But is it possible to take things too far? Cosmos science journalist Petra Stock investigates the fallout from Halloween fun. Petra Stock has a Bachelor of Engineering and a Master of Journalism, both from the University of Melbourne. While she loves writing about new technologies (robots, digital platforms), Petra is nostalgic for the retro kind (letters, cassette tapes).

09:46

EP34 - S1

30 Oct 22

How do glow sticks work? The science of chemiluminescence

With Halloween just around the corner, we're talking all things glow sticks! What makes glow sticks glow, and what does it have to do with ocean bacteria? Let's take a look at the science of chemiluminescence. Ellen Phiddian is a science journalist at Cosmos. She has a BSc (Honours) in chemistry and science communication, and an MSc in science communication, both from the Australian National University.

How do glow sticks work? The science of chemiluminescence

With Halloween just around the corner, we're talking all things glow sticks! What makes glow sticks glow, and what does it have to do with ocean bacteria? Let's take a look at the science of chemiluminescence. Ellen Phiddian is a science journalist at Cosmos. She has a BSc (Honours) in chemistry and science communication, and an MSc in science communication, both from the Australian National University.

07:48

EP33 - S1

27 Oct 22

Wake up! Why do birds call in the morning?

Birds make an incredible cacophony of sound early morning, but why do they do it?  Imma Perfetto is a journalist at Cosmos Magazine and has an honours degree in Science Communication.

Wake up! Why do birds call in the morning?

Birds make an incredible cacophony of sound early morning, but why do they do it?  Imma Perfetto is a journalist at Cosmos Magazine and has an honours degree in Science Communication.

09:41

EP32 - S1

23 Oct 22

What’s the deal with hiccups?

Hiccups are bizarre. Why do we get them? And do any of the cures actually work? Ellen Phiddian worked in science outreach before deciding to become, in her grandmother's words, "one of those whizz-bang science journalists". With a background in chemistry, she's particularly interested in renewable energy, catalysts, and deciphering the ingredients on food packages. Her favourite podcasts are Wardrobe Crisis, Friends at the Table, and just about any audiodrama.

What’s the deal with hiccups?

Hiccups are bizarre. Why do we get them? And do any of the cures actually work? Ellen Phiddian worked in science outreach before deciding to become, in her grandmother's words, "one of those whizz-bang science journalists". With a background in chemistry, she's particularly interested in renewable energy, catalysts, and deciphering the ingredients on food packages. Her favourite podcasts are Wardrobe Crisis, Friends at the Table, and just about any audiodrama.

07:55

EP31 - S1

20 Oct 22

Think Pink: The Science of Barbie

She’s the disco dolly that’s more than 60 years old, stands shorter than a ruler and who’s had more than 200 different careers. But this tiny doll has been troubling adults and researchers for decades. In this episode, we take a deep dive into the controversies and concerns about Barbie’s body shape, gender stereotyping, and ...spying on children? Petra Stock has a Bachelor of Engineering and a Master of Journalism, both from the University of Melbourne. Like Barbie, she’s worked as a Renewable Energy Engineer, an Environmental Advocate and a Journalist. While she loves writing about new technologies (robots, digital platforms), Petra is nostalgic for the retro kind (letters, cassette tapes).

Think Pink: The Science of Barbie

She’s the disco dolly that’s more than 60 years old, stands shorter than a ruler and who’s had more than 200 different careers. But this tiny doll has been troubling adults and researchers for decades. In this episode, we take a deep dive into the controversies and concerns about Barbie’s body shape, gender stereotyping, and ...spying on children? Petra Stock has a Bachelor of Engineering and a Master of Journalism, both from the University of Melbourne. Like Barbie, she’s worked as a Renewable Energy Engineer, an Environmental Advocate and a Journalist. While she loves writing about new technologies (robots, digital platforms), Petra is nostalgic for the retro kind (letters, cassette tapes).

12:45

EP30 - S1

17 Oct 22

Sweet, salty and a little bit saucy: the science of why bad things taste so good

This week we’re looking at heart disease’s arch nemesis – salt and sugar. But salt and sugar aren’t just delicious villains in a movie - they’ve got their own story to tell. In this episode we’ll find out whether our love of sugar and salt is hardwired into out brain, if MSG is actually bad for you, and why it is so hard to analyse the flavour of soy sauce. Jacinta is an enthusiastic tourist in all things science, has a background in microbiology and spends most of their spare time making and eating baked goods.

Sweet, salty and a little bit saucy: the science of why bad things taste so good

This week we’re looking at heart disease’s arch nemesis – salt and sugar. But salt and sugar aren’t just delicious villains in a movie - they’ve got their own story to tell. In this episode we’ll find out whether our love of sugar and salt is hardwired into out brain, if MSG is actually bad for you, and why it is so hard to analyse the flavour of soy sauce. Jacinta is an enthusiastic tourist in all things science, has a background in microbiology and spends most of their spare time making and eating baked goods.

09:23

EP29 - S1

13 Oct 22

Freaky fairgrounds and sunflower science: how do solar panels actually work?

The Sun shines, your calculator works, your Tesla charges, and your house’s battery starts to fill up on stored energy. Meanwhile, up in space, the James Webb Space Telescope collects enough solar light to give it the power it needs to peer into space…   Today, Clare Kenyon talks all things solar panels - how do they work and exactly what shiny new things are coming sometime to a rooftop near you?

Freaky fairgrounds and sunflower science: how do solar panels actually work?

The Sun shines, your calculator works, your Tesla charges, and your house’s battery starts to fill up on stored energy. Meanwhile, up in space, the James Webb Space Telescope collects enough solar light to give it the power it needs to peer into space…   Today, Clare Kenyon talks all things solar panels - how do they work and exactly what shiny new things are coming sometime to a rooftop near you?

09:55

EP28 - S1

10 Oct 22

Modern miracle or dangerous dependence? Stirring the science of caffeine

Caffeine is the fuel that gets us through our day, but what is it, how does it really work and is it possibly not a good thing? Today, Matt buzzes about the drug that many of us can’t get through a day without.

Modern miracle or dangerous dependence? Stirring the science of caffeine

Caffeine is the fuel that gets us through our day, but what is it, how does it really work and is it possibly not a good thing? Today, Matt buzzes about the drug that many of us can’t get through a day without.

11:46

EP27 - S1

6 Oct 22

Keeping up with Kardashians: the science of cosmetic injectables

There’s a chance that you or someone you know has considered cosmetic injectables to change some aspect their appearance. But what are they and how do they work? Let’s cut into the science behind botox, fillers, and lipolytic injections. Imma Perfetto is a journalist at Cosmos Magazine and has an honours degree in Science Communication.

Keeping up with Kardashians: the science of cosmetic injectables

There’s a chance that you or someone you know has considered cosmetic injectables to change some aspect their appearance. But what are they and how do they work? Let’s cut into the science behind botox, fillers, and lipolytic injections. Imma Perfetto is a journalist at Cosmos Magazine and has an honours degree in Science Communication.

10:08

EP26 - S1

3 Oct 22

Are dinosaurs REALLY birds? A story written by evolution

Today we will be traveling back to the time of the dinosaurs to get a picture of how these magnificent beasts evolved and what eventually happened to them. Evrim Yazgin is a Cosmos journalist with a Masters in Physics from the University of Melbourne. His love of palaeontology has burned since he was three and, fun fact: his name means “evolution” in Turkish! The joys of being a biologist’s son.

Are dinosaurs REALLY birds? A story written by evolution

Today we will be traveling back to the time of the dinosaurs to get a picture of how these magnificent beasts evolved and what eventually happened to them. Evrim Yazgin is a Cosmos journalist with a Masters in Physics from the University of Melbourne. His love of palaeontology has burned since he was three and, fun fact: his name means “evolution” in Turkish! The joys of being a biologist’s son.

09:38

EP25 - S1

29 Sep 22

Why do fruit stickers exist - and are they actually edible?

The little stickers on pieces of fruit are everywhere and are one of modern life's irritations or delights depending on your perspective. Here’s some cherry-picked info about fruit stickers. Petra Stock has a Bachelor of Environmental Engineering and a Masters in Journalism, both from the University of Melbourne. Before becoming a journalist, she planned wind farms, researched climate solutions, and assessed environmental and heritage impacts. While she loves writing about new technologies (robots, digital platforms) she’s also nostalgic for the retro kind (letters, cassette tapes, floppy disks).

Why do fruit stickers exist - and are they actually edible?

The little stickers on pieces of fruit are everywhere and are one of modern life's irritations or delights depending on your perspective. Here’s some cherry-picked info about fruit stickers. Petra Stock has a Bachelor of Environmental Engineering and a Masters in Journalism, both from the University of Melbourne. Before becoming a journalist, she planned wind farms, researched climate solutions, and assessed environmental and heritage impacts. While she loves writing about new technologies (robots, digital platforms) she’s also nostalgic for the retro kind (letters, cassette tapes, floppy disks).

11:18

EP24 - S1

22 Sep 22

Why is cheese so stinky? The cheese questions you never wanted to know, answered

This week we’re diving into the deliciously gross world of cheese. How old is the oldest cheese? Why does it smell so bad? And why are most of your favourite cheeses probably actually your favourite moulds? Jacinta is an enthusiastic tourist in all things science, as well as a lactose-intolerant cheese fiend with a background in microbiology.

Why is cheese so stinky? The cheese questions you never wanted to know, answered

This week we’re diving into the deliciously gross world of cheese. How old is the oldest cheese? Why does it smell so bad? And why are most of your favourite cheeses probably actually your favourite moulds? Jacinta is an enthusiastic tourist in all things science, as well as a lactose-intolerant cheese fiend with a background in microbiology.

07:28

EP23 - S1

15 Sep 22

Six myths about fast fashion: What do we know about our clothes, and what do we THINK we know?

What do we know about our clothes – and what do we think we know? Ellen Phiddian worked in science outreach before deciding to become, in her grandmother's words, "one of those whizz-bang science journalists". With a background in chemistry, she's particularly interested in renewable energy, catalysts, and deciphering the ingredients on food packages. Her favourite podcasts are Wardrobe Crisis, Friends at the Table, and just about any audiodrama.

Six myths about fast fashion: What do we know about our clothes, and what do we THINK we know?

What do we know about our clothes – and what do we think we know? Ellen Phiddian worked in science outreach before deciding to become, in her grandmother's words, "one of those whizz-bang science journalists". With a background in chemistry, she's particularly interested in renewable energy, catalysts, and deciphering the ingredients on food packages. Her favourite podcasts are Wardrobe Crisis, Friends at the Table, and just about any audiodrama.

10:07

EP22 - S1

8 Sep 22

What is all the stuff in the universe made of? The hitchhiker's guide to the Standard Model

What is all the stuff in the universe made of? And, for that matter, (pardon the pun) what keeps everything moving, burning, sticking together, blowing apart? The answer is to be found in the hodgepodge assortment known as the Standard Model of Particle Physics. Evrim Yazgin is a Cosmos journalist with a Masters in Physics from the University of Melbourne. His love of science fiction has spurred an interest in all things flux capacitor to quantum-time-antimatter-inverters. 

What is all the stuff in the universe made of? The hitchhiker's guide to the Standard Model

What is all the stuff in the universe made of? And, for that matter, (pardon the pun) what keeps everything moving, burning, sticking together, blowing apart? The answer is to be found in the hodgepodge assortment known as the Standard Model of Particle Physics. Evrim Yazgin is a Cosmos journalist with a Masters in Physics from the University of Melbourne. His love of science fiction has spurred an interest in all things flux capacitor to quantum-time-antimatter-inverters. 

08:20

EP21 - S1

1 Sep 22

What is an "active ingredient" in skincare and what does it actually do to your skin?

Many of us have stared at the packaging of a skincare product, wondering what that strange chemical word actually does. So here are a few of the most common active ingredients and what they do to your skin. Imma Perfetto is a journalist at Cosmos Magazine and has an honours degree in Science Communication.

What is an "active ingredient" in skincare and what does it actually do to your skin?

Many of us have stared at the packaging of a skincare product, wondering what that strange chemical word actually does. So here are a few of the most common active ingredients and what they do to your skin. Imma Perfetto is a journalist at Cosmos Magazine and has an honours degree in Science Communication.

10:39

EP20 - S1

25 Aug 22

Why do songs get stuck in our head, and how do we get them out?

Have you ever been sitting at your desk, minding your own business when out of nowhere a tune bubbles into your brain? So what does science say about earworms? Where they come from and is there any cure? Matthew Agius became a science journalist to share his passion for how the sciences impact our everyday lives. Because he also knows a bit about history, sports and pop culture, he'll happily help out your quiz team in exchange for beer or hot chippies.

Why do songs get stuck in our head, and how do we get them out?

Have you ever been sitting at your desk, minding your own business when out of nowhere a tune bubbles into your brain? So what does science say about earworms? Where they come from and is there any cure? Matthew Agius became a science journalist to share his passion for how the sciences impact our everyday lives. Because he also knows a bit about history, sports and pop culture, he'll happily help out your quiz team in exchange for beer or hot chippies.

09:24

EP19 - S1

18 Aug 22

Is yawning ACTUALLY contagious? And if so, how do we catch a yawn?

Is it really possible to catch a yawn? Why do we do it, anyway? I’ve discovered that it’s actually pretty tricky to nail down answers to those things. It seems that, even though it’s something that most creatures with mouths do, there aren’t that many scientists who are desperate to uncover the secrets of yawning. But let’s explore what science does know… Ellen Phiddian worked in science outreach before deciding to become, in her grandmother's words, "one of those whizz-bang science journalists". With a background in chemistry, she's particularly interested in renewable energy, catalysts, and deciphering the ingredients on food packages. Her favourite podcasts are Wardrobe Crisis, Friends at the Table, and just about any audiodrama.

Is yawning ACTUALLY contagious? And if so, how do we catch a yawn?

Is it really possible to catch a yawn? Why do we do it, anyway? I’ve discovered that it’s actually pretty tricky to nail down answers to those things. It seems that, even though it’s something that most creatures with mouths do, there aren’t that many scientists who are desperate to uncover the secrets of yawning. But let’s explore what science does know… Ellen Phiddian worked in science outreach before deciding to become, in her grandmother's words, "one of those whizz-bang science journalists". With a background in chemistry, she's particularly interested in renewable energy, catalysts, and deciphering the ingredients on food packages. Her favourite podcasts are Wardrobe Crisis, Friends at the Table, and just about any audiodrama.

08:17

EP18 - S1

11 Aug 22

What do luminous space cows have to do with E=mc2?

Strap yourselves in: Today we will be looking at how Einstein’s most famous theory and equation lead to accelerating objects gaining mass. Or do they? Plus, luminous cows - trust us on that one. Evrim Yazgin is a Cosmos journalist with an MSc in Physics from the University of Melbourne. His love of science fiction has spurred an interest in all things flux capacitor to quantum-time-antimatter-inverters.

What do luminous space cows have to do with E=mc2?

Strap yourselves in: Today we will be looking at how Einstein’s most famous theory and equation lead to accelerating objects gaining mass. Or do they? Plus, luminous cows - trust us on that one. Evrim Yazgin is a Cosmos journalist with an MSc in Physics from the University of Melbourne. His love of science fiction has spurred an interest in all things flux capacitor to quantum-time-antimatter-inverters.

09:40

EP17 - S1

4 Aug 22

Can you drink alcohol while taking antibiotics?

We’ve all been given the advice to avoid mixing alcohol and antibiotics, though whether it’s been heeded is another story. Let’s distil the science behind how alcohol and antibiotics interact in the body. Imma Perfetto is a journalist at Cosmos Magazine and has an honours degree in Science Communication.

Can you drink alcohol while taking antibiotics?

We’ve all been given the advice to avoid mixing alcohol and antibiotics, though whether it’s been heeded is another story. Let’s distil the science behind how alcohol and antibiotics interact in the body. Imma Perfetto is a journalist at Cosmos Magazine and has an honours degree in Science Communication.

11:43

EP16 - S1

28 Jul 22

Why we don't ACTUALLY know the exact number for Pi - yes, that Pi, from maths class

This episode looks at some of the mysteries of the number pi – approximated as 22 divided by 7 (22/7 or 22 July is celebrated as Pi Approximation Day), or roughly 3.14. What is pi, what makes it so special, and why does it turn up in some unexpected places? Matilda is a science journalist at the Royal Institution of Australia’s Cosmos Magazine with a background in bioethics and microbiology.

Why we don't ACTUALLY know the exact number for Pi - yes, that Pi, from maths class

This episode looks at some of the mysteries of the number pi – approximated as 22 divided by 7 (22/7 or 22 July is celebrated as Pi Approximation Day), or roughly 3.14. What is pi, what makes it so special, and why does it turn up in some unexpected places? Matilda is a science journalist at the Royal Institution of Australia’s Cosmos Magazine with a background in bioethics and microbiology.

08:29

EP15 - S1

21 Jul 22

What IS actually in the tapwater we drink, plus why you should NEVER drink pure water

You drink it, you wash in it – but what exactly is in tapwater, and why does it taste different in different places? Plus why you should NEVER drink pure water Ellen Phiddian worked in science outreach before deciding to become, in her grandmother's words, "one of those whizz-bang science journalists". With a background in chemistry, she's particularly interested in renewable energy, catalysts, and deciphering the ingredients on food packages. Her favourite podcasts are Wardrobe Crisis, Friends at the Table, and just about any audiodrama.

What IS actually in the tapwater we drink, plus why you should NEVER drink pure water

You drink it, you wash in it – but what exactly is in tapwater, and why does it taste different in different places? Plus why you should NEVER drink pure water Ellen Phiddian worked in science outreach before deciding to become, in her grandmother's words, "one of those whizz-bang science journalists". With a background in chemistry, she's particularly interested in renewable energy, catalysts, and deciphering the ingredients on food packages. Her favourite podcasts are Wardrobe Crisis, Friends at the Table, and just about any audiodrama.

10:13

EP14 - S1

14 Jul 22

The science of Oreos: Why, 95% of the time, the creme only sticks to one side of the cookie

The delightful field of Oreology studies the fluid physics of the creme inside Oreo cookies – how it deforms, flows, and ultimately fractures, leading to separation of the cookie into two pieces. Imma Perfetto is a journalist at Cosmos Magazine and has an honours degree in Science Communication. 

The science of Oreos: Why, 95% of the time, the creme only sticks to one side of the cookie

The delightful field of Oreology studies the fluid physics of the creme inside Oreo cookies – how it deforms, flows, and ultimately fractures, leading to separation of the cookie into two pieces. Imma Perfetto is a journalist at Cosmos Magazine and has an honours degree in Science Communication. 

08:21

EP13 - S1

7 Jul 22

How many basketballs can we fit into the sun?

How many basketballs can you fit in the Sun? And how do we understand really really big numbers? Today we will be calculating the true size of the giant ball of gas in the centre of our Solar System in an exercise in numbers and orders of magnitude. Evrim Yazgin is a Cosmos journalist with an MSc in Physics from the University of Melbourne. His love of science fiction has spurred an interest in all things flux capacitor to quantum-time-antimatter-inverters.

How many basketballs can we fit into the sun?

How many basketballs can you fit in the Sun? And how do we understand really really big numbers? Today we will be calculating the true size of the giant ball of gas in the centre of our Solar System in an exercise in numbers and orders of magnitude. Evrim Yazgin is a Cosmos journalist with an MSc in Physics from the University of Melbourne. His love of science fiction has spurred an interest in all things flux capacitor to quantum-time-antimatter-inverters.

08:34

EP12 - S1

30 Jun 22

MYTHBUSTING: Can eating popping candy and drinking Coke make your stomach explode?

Are you a fan or foe of popping candy? Do you enjoy the way it tingles and crackles, or does it put you off? Whether or not you’ll have the lolly again, it’s hard to deny the feeling the first time popping candy hits your tongue. How many other foods cause such a racket when they get to your mouth? So, how does this novelty lolly work, and is it bad for us? Well, it’s pretty much entirely sugar – so make your own judgement about whether you want to have it for dinner. But scientifically, popping candy is explosively exciting. Ellen Phiddian worked in science outreach before deciding to become, in her grandmother's words, "one of those whizz-bang science journalists". With a background in chemistry, she's particularly interested in renewable energy, catalysts, and deciphering the ingredients on food packages. Her favourite podcasts are Wardrobe Crisis,Friends at the Table, and just about any audiodrama.

MYTHBUSTING: Can eating popping candy and drinking Coke make your stomach explode?

Are you a fan or foe of popping candy? Do you enjoy the way it tingles and crackles, or does it put you off? Whether or not you’ll have the lolly again, it’s hard to deny the feeling the first time popping candy hits your tongue. How many other foods cause such a racket when they get to your mouth? So, how does this novelty lolly work, and is it bad for us? Well, it’s pretty much entirely sugar – so make your own judgement about whether you want to have it for dinner. But scientifically, popping candy is explosively exciting. Ellen Phiddian worked in science outreach before deciding to become, in her grandmother's words, "one of those whizz-bang science journalists". With a background in chemistry, she's particularly interested in renewable energy, catalysts, and deciphering the ingredients on food packages. Her favourite podcasts are Wardrobe Crisis,Friends at the Table, and just about any audiodrama.

06:44

EP11 - S1

23 Jun 22

Shortest day or longest night? Explaining exactly WHY we're about to experience the shortest day of the year

If you’re living in southern Australia, you’re probably in no doubt that winter is coming. Temperatures are dropping, the days are getting shorter, and our minds are increasingly occupied with thoughts of hot chocolates, wood fires and blankets. Or maybe that’s just us. We’re heading towards the winter solstice – the shortest day of the year – on the 21st of June 2022. The summer solstice in December is feeling pretty far away. But have you ever wondered exactly what a solstice is and why it happens? Matilda is a science writer at the Royal Institution of Australia’s Cosmos Magazine with a background in bioethics and microbiology.

Shortest day or longest night? Explaining exactly WHY we're about to experience the shortest day of the year

If you’re living in southern Australia, you’re probably in no doubt that winter is coming. Temperatures are dropping, the days are getting shorter, and our minds are increasingly occupied with thoughts of hot chocolates, wood fires and blankets. Or maybe that’s just us. We’re heading towards the winter solstice – the shortest day of the year – on the 21st of June 2022. The summer solstice in December is feeling pretty far away. But have you ever wondered exactly what a solstice is and why it happens? Matilda is a science writer at the Royal Institution of Australia’s Cosmos Magazine with a background in bioethics and microbiology.

09:07

EP10 - S1

16 Jun 22

What is the James Webb Space Telescope, and what’s it looking for?

In today's episode, we look at the recently launched telescope, and its pioneering gaze back into the birth of our universe. Amalyah Hart is a science journalist at the Royal Institution’s Cosmos Magazine. She has a degree in archaeology and anthropology and a masters in journalism.  

What is the James Webb Space Telescope, and what’s it looking for?

In today's episode, we look at the recently launched telescope, and its pioneering gaze back into the birth of our universe. Amalyah Hart is a science journalist at the Royal Institution’s Cosmos Magazine. She has a degree in archaeology and anthropology and a masters in journalism.  

08:57

EP09 - S1

9 Jun 22

Antibiotic resistance: When minor injuries become terrifying enemies

Antibiotic resistance could have us heading for a post-antibiotic era where common infections and minor injuries become terrifying enemies. How did we get here, and what’s at stake? Imma Perfetto is a journalist at Cosmos magazine and has an honours degree in science communication.

Antibiotic resistance: When minor injuries become terrifying enemies

Antibiotic resistance could have us heading for a post-antibiotic era where common infections and minor injuries become terrifying enemies. How did we get here, and what’s at stake? Imma Perfetto is a journalist at Cosmos magazine and has an honours degree in science communication.

09:30

EP08 - S1

2 Jun 22

Hair goes frizzy as soon as it's humid outside? There's a reason for that

This episode looks at the science of hair – what is it made of, why does it come in different shapes, and why does it go grey when we get older? Matilda is a science writer at the Royal Institution of Australia’s Cosmos Magazine with a background in bioethics and microbiology. Special thanks to Kay Fitzgerald from Sinclair Dermatology for their help with this episode.

Hair goes frizzy as soon as it's humid outside? There's a reason for that

This episode looks at the science of hair – what is it made of, why does it come in different shapes, and why does it go grey when we get older? Matilda is a science writer at the Royal Institution of Australia’s Cosmos Magazine with a background in bioethics and microbiology. Special thanks to Kay Fitzgerald from Sinclair Dermatology for their help with this episode.

08:53

EP07 - S1

26 May 22

Does pricking the sausage ACTUALLY make it healthier? The science of the sausage sizzle

Today we are turning up the heat on the humble sausage sizzle: what’s in the sausage, what goes around it, and why we cook them. Ellen Phiddian worked in science outreach before deciding to become, in her grandmother's words, "one of those whizz-bang science journalists". With a background in chemistry, she's particularly interested in renewable energy, catalysts, and deciphering the ingredients on food packages. Her favourite podcasts are Wardrobe Crisis,Friends at the Table, and just about any audiodrama.

Does pricking the sausage ACTUALLY make it healthier? The science of the sausage sizzle

Today we are turning up the heat on the humble sausage sizzle: what’s in the sausage, what goes around it, and why we cook them. Ellen Phiddian worked in science outreach before deciding to become, in her grandmother's words, "one of those whizz-bang science journalists". With a background in chemistry, she's particularly interested in renewable energy, catalysts, and deciphering the ingredients on food packages. Her favourite podcasts are Wardrobe Crisis,Friends at the Table, and just about any audiodrama.

08:28

EP06 - S1

19 May 22

Can human bodies be cryogenically frozen?

Today we're finding out about cryogenics: whether you can actually freeze a human body and then bring that person back to life.  Amalyah Hart is a science journalist at the Royal Institution’s Cosmos Magazine. She has a degree in archaeology and anthropology and a masters in journalism.  

Can human bodies be cryogenically frozen?

Today we're finding out about cryogenics: whether you can actually freeze a human body and then bring that person back to life.  Amalyah Hart is a science journalist at the Royal Institution’s Cosmos Magazine. She has a degree in archaeology and anthropology and a masters in journalism.  

06:53

EP05 - S1

12 May 22

What's happening when corals bleach?

We’ve all heard about coral bleaching, but do you know what’s actually happening to coral when it turns white? Let’s dive a little deeper into the science behind coral bleaching. Imma Perfetto is a journalist at Cosmos magazine and has an honours degree in science communication.

What's happening when corals bleach?

We’ve all heard about coral bleaching, but do you know what’s actually happening to coral when it turns white? Let’s dive a little deeper into the science behind coral bleaching. Imma Perfetto is a journalist at Cosmos magazine and has an honours degree in science communication.

09:04

EP04 - S1

5 May 22

Forget deodorant: Why scientists reckon we’ll soon be getting ARMPIT transplants to help with BO

This episode looks at the science of not smelling – from deodorant to the skin microbiome. Matilda is a science writer at the Royal Institution of Australia’s Cosmos Magazine with a background in bioethics and microbiology. 

Forget deodorant: Why scientists reckon we’ll soon be getting ARMPIT transplants to help with BO

This episode looks at the science of not smelling – from deodorant to the skin microbiome. Matilda is a science writer at the Royal Institution of Australia’s Cosmos Magazine with a background in bioethics and microbiology. 

10:41

EP03 - S1

28 Apr 22

How can soil carbon fight climate change?

Soil carbon sequestration has been hailed as a solution to the climate crisis. Can it really live up to the hype? Ellen Phiddian worked in science outreach before deciding to become, in her grandmother's words, "one of those whizz-bang science journalists". With a background in chemistry, she's particularly interested in renewable energy, catalysts, and deciphering the ingredients on food packages. Her favourite podcasts are Wardrobe Crisis,Friends at the Table, and just about any audiodrama.

How can soil carbon fight climate change?

Soil carbon sequestration has been hailed as a solution to the climate crisis. Can it really live up to the hype? Ellen Phiddian worked in science outreach before deciding to become, in her grandmother's words, "one of those whizz-bang science journalists". With a background in chemistry, she's particularly interested in renewable energy, catalysts, and deciphering the ingredients on food packages. Her favourite podcasts are Wardrobe Crisis,Friends at the Table, and just about any audiodrama.

08:18

EP02 - S1

21 Apr 22

How do scientists know how old the Earth is?

We're travelling back in time to understand how old our small blue dot is - and how scientists worked it out. Amalyah Hart is a science journalist at the Royal Institution’s Cosmos Magazine. She has a degree in archaeology and anthropology and a masters in journalism.  

How do scientists know how old the Earth is?

We're travelling back in time to understand how old our small blue dot is - and how scientists worked it out. Amalyah Hart is a science journalist at the Royal Institution’s Cosmos Magazine. She has a degree in archaeology and anthropology and a masters in journalism.  

09:31

EP01 - S1

13 Apr 22

Introducing the brand new podcast that will answer all of life’s questions, big and small

Yes, the rumours are true. From LiSTNR and Cosmos comes a brand new weekly podcast that’s going to answer all those weird and wacky questions you never thought you’d know the answer to. Or that you just couldn’t be bothered looking up online. We don’t judge here.

Introducing the brand new podcast that will answer all of life’s questions, big and small

Yes, the rumours are true. From LiSTNR and Cosmos comes a brand new weekly podcast that’s going to answer all those weird and wacky questions you never thought you’d know the answer to. Or that you just couldn’t be bothered looking up online. We don’t judge here.

01:10

0

7 Apr 22


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