Huh Science Explained

Huh Science Explained

Put your thinking caps on, folks. Huh? Science Explained is here, the weekly podcast brought to you by LiSTNR and Cosmos. Hosted by Cosmos’ very own science journos, this is the podcast that will answer all of life’s questions – in just 10

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Season 1


How many basketballs can we fit into the sun?

How many basketballs can you fit in the Sun? And how do we understand really really big numbers? Today we will be calculating the true size of the giant ball of gas in the centre of our Solar System in an exercise in numbers and orders of magnitude. Evrim Yazgin is a Cosmos journalist with an MSc in Physics from the University of Melbourne. His love of science fiction has spurred an interest in all things flux capacitor to quantum-time-antimatter-inverters.

How many basketballs can we fit into the sun?

How many basketballs can you fit in the Sun? And how do we understand really really big numbers? Today we will be calculating the true size of the giant ball of gas in the centre of our Solar System in an exercise in numbers and orders of magnitude. Evrim Yazgin is a Cosmos journalist with an MSc in Physics from the University of Melbourne. His love of science fiction has spurred an interest in all things flux capacitor to quantum-time-antimatter-inverters.

08:34

EP12 - S1

30 Jun 22

MYTHBUSTING: Can eating popping candy and drinking Coke make your stomach explode?

Are you a fan or foe of popping candy? Do you enjoy the way it tingles and crackles, or does it put you off? Whether or not you’ll have the lolly again, it’s hard to deny the feeling the first time popping candy hits your tongue. How many other foods cause such a racket when they get to your mouth? So, how does this novelty lolly work, and is it bad for us? Well, it’s pretty much entirely sugar – so make your own judgement about whether you want to have it for dinner. But scientifically, popping candy is explosively exciting. Ellen Phiddian worked in science outreach before deciding to become, in her grandmother's words, "one of those whizz-bang science journalists". With a background in chemistry, she's particularly interested in renewable energy, catalysts, and deciphering the ingredients on food packages. Her favourite podcasts are Wardrobe Crisis,Friends at the Table, and just about any audiodrama.

MYTHBUSTING: Can eating popping candy and drinking Coke make your stomach explode?

Are you a fan or foe of popping candy? Do you enjoy the way it tingles and crackles, or does it put you off? Whether or not you’ll have the lolly again, it’s hard to deny the feeling the first time popping candy hits your tongue. How many other foods cause such a racket when they get to your mouth? So, how does this novelty lolly work, and is it bad for us? Well, it’s pretty much entirely sugar – so make your own judgement about whether you want to have it for dinner. But scientifically, popping candy is explosively exciting. Ellen Phiddian worked in science outreach before deciding to become, in her grandmother's words, "one of those whizz-bang science journalists". With a background in chemistry, she's particularly interested in renewable energy, catalysts, and deciphering the ingredients on food packages. Her favourite podcasts are Wardrobe Crisis,Friends at the Table, and just about any audiodrama.

06:44

EP11 - S1

23 Jun 22

Shortest day or longest night? Explaining exactly WHY we're about to experience the shortest day of the year

If you’re living in southern Australia, you’re probably in no doubt that winter is coming. Temperatures are dropping, the days are getting shorter, and our minds are increasingly occupied with thoughts of hot chocolates, wood fires and blankets. Or maybe that’s just us. We’re heading towards the winter solstice – the shortest day of the year – on the 21st of June 2022. The summer solstice in December is feeling pretty far away. But have you ever wondered exactly what a solstice is and why it happens? Matilda is a science writer at the Royal Institution of Australia’s Cosmos Magazine with a background in bioethics and microbiology.

Shortest day or longest night? Explaining exactly WHY we're about to experience the shortest day of the year

If you’re living in southern Australia, you’re probably in no doubt that winter is coming. Temperatures are dropping, the days are getting shorter, and our minds are increasingly occupied with thoughts of hot chocolates, wood fires and blankets. Or maybe that’s just us. We’re heading towards the winter solstice – the shortest day of the year – on the 21st of June 2022. The summer solstice in December is feeling pretty far away. But have you ever wondered exactly what a solstice is and why it happens? Matilda is a science writer at the Royal Institution of Australia’s Cosmos Magazine with a background in bioethics and microbiology.

09:07

EP10 - S1

16 Jun 22

What is the James Webb Space Telescope, and what’s it looking for?

In today's episode, we look at the recently launched telescope, and its pioneering gaze back into the birth of our universe. Amalyah Hart is a science journalist at the Royal Institution’s Cosmos Magazine. She has a degree in archaeology and anthropology and a masters in journalism.  

What is the James Webb Space Telescope, and what’s it looking for?

In today's episode, we look at the recently launched telescope, and its pioneering gaze back into the birth of our universe. Amalyah Hart is a science journalist at the Royal Institution’s Cosmos Magazine. She has a degree in archaeology and anthropology and a masters in journalism.  

08:57

EP09 - S1

9 Jun 22

Antibiotic resistance: When minor injuries become terrifying enemies

Antibiotic resistance could have us heading for a post-antibiotic era where common infections and minor injuries become terrifying enemies. How did we get here, and what’s at stake? Imma Perfetto is a journalist at Cosmos magazine and has an honours degree in science communication.

Antibiotic resistance: When minor injuries become terrifying enemies

Antibiotic resistance could have us heading for a post-antibiotic era where common infections and minor injuries become terrifying enemies. How did we get here, and what’s at stake? Imma Perfetto is a journalist at Cosmos magazine and has an honours degree in science communication.

09:30

EP08 - S1

2 Jun 22

Hair goes frizzy as soon as it's humid outside? There's a reason for that

This episode looks at the science of hair – what is it made of, why does it come in different shapes, and why does it go grey when we get older? Matilda is a science writer at the Royal Institution of Australia’s Cosmos Magazine with a background in bioethics and microbiology. Special thanks to Kay Fitzgerald from Sinclair Dermatology for their help with this episode.

Hair goes frizzy as soon as it's humid outside? There's a reason for that

This episode looks at the science of hair – what is it made of, why does it come in different shapes, and why does it go grey when we get older? Matilda is a science writer at the Royal Institution of Australia’s Cosmos Magazine with a background in bioethics and microbiology. Special thanks to Kay Fitzgerald from Sinclair Dermatology for their help with this episode.

08:53

EP07 - S1

26 May 22

Does pricking the sausage ACTUALLY make it healthier? The science of the sausage sizzle

Today we are turning up the heat on the humble sausage sizzle: what’s in the sausage, what goes around it, and why we cook them. Ellen Phiddian worked in science outreach before deciding to become, in her grandmother's words, "one of those whizz-bang science journalists". With a background in chemistry, she's particularly interested in renewable energy, catalysts, and deciphering the ingredients on food packages. Her favourite podcasts are Wardrobe Crisis,Friends at the Table, and just about any audiodrama.

Does pricking the sausage ACTUALLY make it healthier? The science of the sausage sizzle

Today we are turning up the heat on the humble sausage sizzle: what’s in the sausage, what goes around it, and why we cook them. Ellen Phiddian worked in science outreach before deciding to become, in her grandmother's words, "one of those whizz-bang science journalists". With a background in chemistry, she's particularly interested in renewable energy, catalysts, and deciphering the ingredients on food packages. Her favourite podcasts are Wardrobe Crisis,Friends at the Table, and just about any audiodrama.

08:28

EP06 - S1

19 May 22

Can human bodies be cryogenically frozen?

Today we're finding out about cryogenics: whether you can actually freeze a human body and then bring that person back to life.  Amalyah Hart is a science journalist at the Royal Institution’s Cosmos Magazine. She has a degree in archaeology and anthropology and a masters in journalism.  

Can human bodies be cryogenically frozen?

Today we're finding out about cryogenics: whether you can actually freeze a human body and then bring that person back to life.  Amalyah Hart is a science journalist at the Royal Institution’s Cosmos Magazine. She has a degree in archaeology and anthropology and a masters in journalism.  

06:53

EP05 - S1

12 May 22

What's happening when corals bleach?

We’ve all heard about coral bleaching, but do you know what’s actually happening to coral when it turns white? Let’s dive a little deeper into the science behind coral bleaching. Imma Perfetto is a journalist at Cosmos magazine and has an honours degree in science communication.

What's happening when corals bleach?

We’ve all heard about coral bleaching, but do you know what’s actually happening to coral when it turns white? Let’s dive a little deeper into the science behind coral bleaching. Imma Perfetto is a journalist at Cosmos magazine and has an honours degree in science communication.

09:04

EP04 - S1

5 May 22

Forget deodorant: Why scientists reckon we’ll soon be getting ARMPIT transplants to help with BO

This episode looks at the science of not smelling – from deodorant to the skin microbiome. Matilda is a science writer at the Royal Institution of Australia’s Cosmos Magazine with a background in bioethics and microbiology. 

Forget deodorant: Why scientists reckon we’ll soon be getting ARMPIT transplants to help with BO

This episode looks at the science of not smelling – from deodorant to the skin microbiome. Matilda is a science writer at the Royal Institution of Australia’s Cosmos Magazine with a background in bioethics and microbiology. 

10:41

EP03 - S1

28 Apr 22

How can soil carbon fight climate change?

Soil carbon sequestration has been hailed as a solution to the climate crisis. Can it really live up to the hype? Ellen Phiddian worked in science outreach before deciding to become, in her grandmother's words, "one of those whizz-bang science journalists". With a background in chemistry, she's particularly interested in renewable energy, catalysts, and deciphering the ingredients on food packages. Her favourite podcasts are Wardrobe Crisis,Friends at the Table, and just about any audiodrama.

How can soil carbon fight climate change?

Soil carbon sequestration has been hailed as a solution to the climate crisis. Can it really live up to the hype? Ellen Phiddian worked in science outreach before deciding to become, in her grandmother's words, "one of those whizz-bang science journalists". With a background in chemistry, she's particularly interested in renewable energy, catalysts, and deciphering the ingredients on food packages. Her favourite podcasts are Wardrobe Crisis,Friends at the Table, and just about any audiodrama.

08:18

EP02 - S1

21 Apr 22

How do scientists know how old the Earth is?

We're travelling back in time to understand how old our small blue dot is - and how scientists worked it out. Amalyah Hart is a science journalist at the Royal Institution’s Cosmos Magazine. She has a degree in archaeology and anthropology and a masters in journalism.  

How do scientists know how old the Earth is?

We're travelling back in time to understand how old our small blue dot is - and how scientists worked it out. Amalyah Hart is a science journalist at the Royal Institution’s Cosmos Magazine. She has a degree in archaeology and anthropology and a masters in journalism.  

09:31

EP01 - S1

13 Apr 22

Introducing the brand new podcast that will answer all of life’s questions, big and small

Yes, the rumours are true. From LiSTNR and Cosmos comes a brand new weekly podcast that’s going to answer all those weird and wacky questions you never thought you’d know the answer to. Or that you just couldn’t be bothered looking up online. We don’t judge here.

Introducing the brand new podcast that will answer all of life’s questions, big and small

Yes, the rumours are true. From LiSTNR and Cosmos comes a brand new weekly podcast that’s going to answer all those weird and wacky questions you never thought you’d know the answer to. Or that you just couldn’t be bothered looking up online. We don’t judge here.

01:10

0

7 Apr 22

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